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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Professor Bridget Rogers"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Harrison, Melissa Ambre. Heterogeneously Alloyed Semiconductor Nanocrystals with Induced Chemical Composition Gradients.

Degree: PhD, Interdisciplinary Materials Science, 2012, Vanderbilt University

Semiconductor nanocrystals of CdSSe exhibiting chemical composition gradients are synthesized via a facile, one-pot synthesis. Varying degrees of gradation are observed as growth temperatures are manipulated to alter rates of reactivity for anionic precursors. Stoichiometries, with growth time and change in temperature, are determined using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) to demonstrate chemical composition gradients. Sizes and structures of compositionally graded CdSSe nanocrystals are determined using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques, respectively. We employ absorption spectroscopy and photoluminescence techniques to elucidate corresponding optical properties. Nanocrystals with chemical composition gradients demonstrating enhanced luminescence efficiency could be the key to improved nanocrystal optical performance. Advisors/Committee Members: Professor Timothy P. Hanusa (committee member), Professor Bridget Rogers (committee member), Professor Sandra J. Rosenthal (Committee Chair), Professor Sharon M. Weiss (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: crystal engineering; quantum dots; nanotechnology; alloy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Harrison, M. A. (2012). Heterogeneously Alloyed Semiconductor Nanocrystals with Induced Chemical Composition Gradients. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15181

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Harrison, Melissa Ambre. “Heterogeneously Alloyed Semiconductor Nanocrystals with Induced Chemical Composition Gradients.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15181.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Harrison, Melissa Ambre. “Heterogeneously Alloyed Semiconductor Nanocrystals with Induced Chemical Composition Gradients.” 2012. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Harrison MA. Heterogeneously Alloyed Semiconductor Nanocrystals with Induced Chemical Composition Gradients. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2012. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15181.

Council of Science Editors:

Harrison MA. Heterogeneously Alloyed Semiconductor Nanocrystals with Induced Chemical Composition Gradients. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15181


Vanderbilt University

2. Hasan, Saad Abir. Nanoparticles as the sole building blocks of macroscopic solids.

Degree: PhD, Interdisciplinary Materials Science, 2010, Vanderbilt University

Colloidal nanoparticles in an assortment of shapes (e.g., spherical, rod-like, tube-like, sheet-like) have been the focus of far-reaching research pursuits due to their attractive material-dependent and size-dependent electronic, optical, and magnetic properties. One approach to deploy these materials in devices is to fabricate them into multilayered thin films. Fabricating thin films over macroscopic dimensions requires controlling the assembly behavior of a very large number of nanoparticles. In addition to understanding the assembly behavior, we were interested in whether this many-particle assembly could exist as a free-standing object. To determine the stability of the nanoparticle assemblies, we used the principles of DLVO theory to calculate the potential energy of the interaction between two particles. Nanoparticle films were assembled using electrophoretic deposition. To fabricate free-standing films, we proposed a technique in which particles would be deposited atop a thin sacrificial layer. This technique of sacrificial layer electrophoretic deposition (SLED) was demonstrated by producing macroscopic, free-standing films of hexane-dispersed CdSe and iron oxide nanoparticles and of water-dispersed sheets of exfoliated graphene oxide (eGO). By tuning the pH of the aqueous eGO suspensions, we also demonstrated the fabrication of films with different microstructures, which exhibited both hydrophilic and hydrophobic surface wetting properties. Advisors/Committee Members: Professor Sokrates Pantelides (committee member), Professor Bridget Rogers (committee member), Professor Sandra Rosenthal (committee member), Professor James Dickerson (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: nanoparticles; electrophoretic deposition; colloidal; graphene oxide; free-standing; assembly

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hasan, S. A. (2010). Nanoparticles as the sole building blocks of macroscopic solids. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12160

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hasan, Saad Abir. “Nanoparticles as the sole building blocks of macroscopic solids.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed May 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12160.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hasan, Saad Abir. “Nanoparticles as the sole building blocks of macroscopic solids.” 2010. Web. 08 May 2021.

Vancouver:

Hasan SA. Nanoparticles as the sole building blocks of macroscopic solids. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. [cited 2021 May 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12160.

Council of Science Editors:

Hasan SA. Nanoparticles as the sole building blocks of macroscopic solids. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12160

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