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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Paul Newhouse"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Edmiston, Elliot Kale. Biobehavioral Response to Social Judgment in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Degree: PhD, Neuroscience, 2015, Vanderbilt University

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social behavior. It is unclear if deficits are due to disinterest in social stimuli, or to an elevated stress response. The autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis facilitate arousal, as well as approach and avoidance behavior in response to sensory information, including social stimuli. Research in our lab has shown blunted responsivity to social judgment in children with ASD. Previous work has also demonstrated alterations in autonomic regulation, including respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), a measure of PNS function. The majority of prior work has focused on children with ASD, but adolescents with ASD have been understudied. The adolescent period is of interest, as this developmental epoch is associated with increased salience of social judgment in typically developing (TD) populations. In this study, we employed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) to study RSA and salivary cortisol response to social judgment in ASD compared to TD adolescents. Participants underwent a modified version of the TSST, in which one of the raters was replaced with an age-matched peer. At arrival and during the TSST, ECG was obtained. Salivary cortisol data was obtained prior to and following the TSST. Operationalized behavior coding was collected using video recordings of the TSST. RSA was calculated from ECG. We performed repeated measures ANOVA to determine group differences in RSA, as well as for behaviors. Paired sample t-tests were used to calculate within-group cortisol response to the TSST. TD participants showed higher mean RSA values than ASD participants at all time points. Cortisol data showed a significant increase in response to the TSST in the TD group but not the ASD group. The TD group showed more displacement behaviors than the ASD group. Our findings indicated reduced regulatory capacity as indexed by RSA in ASD adolescents compared to TD peers. The lack of a cortisol response to the TSST in the ASD group could suggest that the TSST is not interpreted as stressful or salient for ASD participants, as does the reduced displacement behaviors in the ASD group. Advisors/Committee Members: Tedra Walden (committee member), Beth Malow (committee member), Mark Wallace (committee member), Paul Newhouse (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: HPA axis; respiratory sinus arrhythmia; autism spectrum disorder; salivary cortisol; adolescence; stress; trier social stress test

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Edmiston, E. K. (2015). Biobehavioral Response to Social Judgment in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15206

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Edmiston, Elliot Kale. “Biobehavioral Response to Social Judgment in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15206.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Edmiston, Elliot Kale. “Biobehavioral Response to Social Judgment in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.” 2015. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Edmiston EK. Biobehavioral Response to Social Judgment in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15206.

Council of Science Editors:

Edmiston EK. Biobehavioral Response to Social Judgment in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15206


Vanderbilt University

2. D'Aoust, Laura Nicole. Examination of Candidate Exonic Variants that Confer Susceptibility to Alzheimer Disease in the Amish.

Degree: PhD, Human Genetics, 2015, Vanderbilt University

Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia. As with many complex diseases, the identified variants do not explain the total expected genetic risk that is based on heritability estimates for AD. Isolated founder populations, such as the Amish, are advantageous for genetic studies as they overcome limitations associated with complex population studies. Amish AD cases harbored a significantly higher burden of the known risk alleles compared to Amish cognitively normal controls, but a significantly lower burden when compared to cases from a cohort of unrelated individuals. These results suggest that known loci explain some of the genetic effects and that there may be different underlying genetic architectures between the two populations. Whole-exome sequencing of a selected subset of the overall study population was used as a screening tool to identify variants located in the regions of the genome that are most likely to contribute risk. By then genotyping the top candidate variants from the known AD genes and implicated linkage regions from previous studies in the full data set, new associations could be confirmed. The most significant result (p = 0.0012) was for rs73938538, a synonymous variant in LAMA1 within the previously identified linkage peak on chromosome 18, but this association did not generalize when tested in a dataset of unrelated individuals. These results indicate that exonic variation in a majority of previously associated LOAD genes, and regions implicated by previous linkage studies, does not contribute to risk for LOAD in the Amish. Advisors/Committee Members: Paul Newhouse (committee member), Tricia Thornton-Wells (committee member), Jonathan L Haines (committee member), Bingshan Li (committee member), Dana Crawford (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Alzheimer; family-based study; genetics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

D'Aoust, L. N. (2015). Examination of Candidate Exonic Variants that Confer Susceptibility to Alzheimer Disease in the Amish. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10861

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

D'Aoust, Laura Nicole. “Examination of Candidate Exonic Variants that Confer Susceptibility to Alzheimer Disease in the Amish.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 13, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10861.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

D'Aoust, Laura Nicole. “Examination of Candidate Exonic Variants that Confer Susceptibility to Alzheimer Disease in the Amish.” 2015. Web. 13 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

D'Aoust LN. Examination of Candidate Exonic Variants that Confer Susceptibility to Alzheimer Disease in the Amish. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 13]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10861.

Council of Science Editors:

D'Aoust LN. Examination of Candidate Exonic Variants that Confer Susceptibility to Alzheimer Disease in the Amish. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10861

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