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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Keith L. Obstein"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Beccani, Marco. A Modular Open Source Architecture for Rapid Prototyping of Medical Capsule Robots.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2015, Vanderbilt University

Over the last decade, researchers have started exploring the design space of MCR: devices that can operate autonomously within the human body and can diagnose, prevent, monitor, and cure diseases. MCR are miniature multifunctional devices whose applications are spanning from abdominal surgery to GI endoscopy. MCR are severely resource constrained devices in size and consequently, in available power and computational capacity. Although the research in the area of MCR is an active topic and has grown exponentially, available devices provide only diagnostic functionalities. In fact, the design process of an MCR is expensive and time consuming. Research groups that are active in this field are usually forced to follow a custom approach to develop MCR from the ground up. The current state of the art lacks a platform to systematize the design of MCR which could open this research field to a wider community and, at the same time, create better designs through advanced tool support. This dissertation focuses on a modular open source architecture to enable the rapid prototyping of MCR. The advantages of the proposed architecture include module reusability and a reconfigurable software library. Users will be able to build a capsule with functions of their own design by choosing components available from a hardware/software library or by introducing their own. This will prevent the need to design custom modules and face some of the technical challenges typical for MCR development. This doctoral dissertation describes the modular architecture in details and presents some applications where it was successfully adopted for the design of MCR. Some of these include an MCR to restore wireless tissue palpation in MIS, a drug delivery MCR, a module for magnetic localization, a wireless capsule for the measurement of resistant properties in the GI tract, and an embedded cane for gait patterns recognition. Advisors/Committee Members: Nilanjan Sarkar (committee member), Akos Ledeczi (committee member), Keith L. Obstein (committee member), Karl Zelig (committee member), pietro valdastri (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Medical Robotics; Wireless Capsule Endoscopy; Tissue Palpation; Minimally Invasive Surgery; Design Environment

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Beccani, M. (2015). A Modular Open Source Architecture for Rapid Prototyping of Medical Capsule Robots. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14851

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Beccani, Marco. “A Modular Open Source Architecture for Rapid Prototyping of Medical Capsule Robots.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14851.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Beccani, Marco. “A Modular Open Source Architecture for Rapid Prototyping of Medical Capsule Robots.” 2015. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Beccani M. A Modular Open Source Architecture for Rapid Prototyping of Medical Capsule Robots. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14851.

Council of Science Editors:

Beccani M. A Modular Open Source Architecture for Rapid Prototyping of Medical Capsule Robots. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14851


Vanderbilt University

2. Garbin, Nicolo. Endoscopic and magnetic actuation for miniature lifesaving devices.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical Engineering, 2019, Vanderbilt University

The need for medical technologies that improve patient access to diagnostic techniques and treat pathological conditions in a minimally invasive approach is capitalized in this dissertation with the development, characterization, and testing toward clinical use of a series of endoscopically and magnetically actuated devices. The first half of this dissertation proposed an alternative solution to the use of conventional flexible endoscopy for the diagnosis of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The proposed disposable flexible endoscope is, compared to conventional endoscopy, more cost effective, intuitive, and hygienic. The device’s endoscopic tip is controlled via pneumatic actuation. Modeling was inspired from multi-backbone continuum robots, and two user interfaces were investigated. First, a robotic platform is used to tackle the closed-loop control problem, then a novel user interface allows direct user-to-task mapping via pure mechanical actuation. The effectiveness of the latter approach was further assessed during in-vivo and cadaveric trials, ease of use was instead determined via approved user studies that involved medical providers with different backgrounds. The device is currently undergoing design freeze toward human trials. The second half of this dissertation exploits robotic control of magnetic actuation to develop therapeutic medical devices with applications in minimally invasive surgery and subcutaneous implants. A laparoscopic retractor able to retract up to 10 times its own weight, and laparoscopic camera with an hemispherical workspace via a compact unique magnetic coupling, decrease by two the number of incisions needed for abdominal surgery. These technologies decrease trauma, pain, and risk of infection for the patients, and offer better visibility, surgical workspace access, and decrease trocar crowding for the surgeons. Then, a subcutaneously implantable pump developed for the treatment of refractory ascites removes a large quantity of fluids without the need of on-board electronics. All of these devices were tested during ex-vivo and in-vivo trials highlighting the advantages and effectiveness of using magnetic coupling for clinically relevant therapeutic tasks. Advisors/Committee Members: Thomas J. Withrow (committee member), Robert J. Webster III (committee member), Nabil Simaan (committee member), Pietro Valdastri (Committee Chair), Keith L. Obstein (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: magnetic actuation; disposable; robotic; medical device

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garbin, N. (2019). Endoscopic and magnetic actuation for miniature lifesaving devices. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10533

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garbin, Nicolo. “Endoscopic and magnetic actuation for miniature lifesaving devices.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10533.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garbin, Nicolo. “Endoscopic and magnetic actuation for miniature lifesaving devices.” 2019. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Garbin N. Endoscopic and magnetic actuation for miniature lifesaving devices. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10533.

Council of Science Editors:

Garbin N. Endoscopic and magnetic actuation for miniature lifesaving devices. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10533

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