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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Kara Jackson"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Wilson, Jonee. Investigating and Improving Designs for Supporting Professional Development Facilitatorsâ Learning.

Degree: PhD, Learning, Teaching and Diversity, 2015, Vanderbilt University

This dissertation reports on a retrospective analysis of a design study conducted in partnership between researchers and the leaders of a large U.S. urban district to investigate and support the development of professional development (PD) facilitators. The intent of the study was to examine what PD facilitators need to know and be able to do in order to design and implement high-quality professional development (HQPD), and to test and improve a design for supporting the development of this expertise. HQPD refers to PD that has the potential to support teachers in significantly reorganizing their current practice in order to develop inquiry-oriented teaching practices that support all studentsâ engagement in rigorous disciplinary activity. This design study is a case of supporting the development of district capacity to provide HQPD for teachers by supporting the development of content specific PD facilitation practices. In reporting on this design study, I describe the work of developing, testing, and revising conjectures about both the PD facilitatorsâ learning process and effective means of supporting that learning. In reporting this work, I contribute to developing theories about how to support PD facilitatorsâ learning more generally. My analysis provides a rationale for proposed revisions to the design for PD facilitatorsâ learning that can be examined in future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Leona Schauble (committee member), Ilana Horn (committee member), Kara Jackson (committee member), Paul Cobb (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Teacher Education; Professional Development for PD leaders; Mathematics Education; Professional Development

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, J. (2015). Investigating and Improving Designs for Supporting Professional Development Facilitatorsâ Learning. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-07222015-152443/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, Jonee. “Investigating and Improving Designs for Supporting Professional Development Facilitatorsâ Learning.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-07222015-152443/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, Jonee. “Investigating and Improving Designs for Supporting Professional Development Facilitatorsâ Learning.” 2015. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Wilson J. Investigating and Improving Designs for Supporting Professional Development Facilitatorsâ Learning. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-07222015-152443/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson J. Investigating and Improving Designs for Supporting Professional Development Facilitatorsâ Learning. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-07222015-152443/ ;

2. Schmidt, Rebecca Anne. Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement.

Degree: PhD, Leadership and Policy Studies, 2013, Vanderbilt University

This project uses a large multi-state dataset to address three aspects of the relationship between tracking and student achievement that have been understudied. Chapter II establishes that rigorous instruction is substantially more common in high track classes. Rigorous instruction is defined as teaching that emphasizes justification and reasoning, and thus this gap between track levels represents a rationing of high status knowledge. However, this type of instruction only mediates a small proportion of the relationship between track level and achievement on state achievement tests. Chapter III finds that a developmental view of ability is significantly associated with student achievement. This conception of ability sees all students as capable of rigorous mathematics with the correct supports. Students in untracked settings whose teachers describe continuing to include low-achieving students in rigorous mathematics are predicted to out-score tracked students. Chapter IV shows that one support for low-achieving students outside the regular classroom, double dose instruction, can actually negatively impact their achievement, depending on the characteristics of the program. While some characteristics were associated with positive student achievement, only four schools employed these characteristics. In conclusion, I argue that each of these analyses provides a small window into policy and research direction for the future. If schools wish to support all students to succeed, they must emphasize rigorous mathematics not just among the highest-achieving, advocate for a developmental view of ability that sees all students as capable of success in this type of mathematics, and consider how the implementation of supports for students can be as important as the adoption of the supports as policy. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Kara Jackson (committee member), Dr. Christopher Loss (committee member), Dr. Ronald W. Zimmer (committee member), Dr. Thomas Smith (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: instructional quality; IQA; teacher beliefs; achievement; ability; middle school; double dose; support class; support classes; supplemental class; tracking; mathematics; supplemental classes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schmidt, R. A. (2013). Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03142013-164523/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schmidt, Rebecca Anne. “Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03142013-164523/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schmidt, Rebecca Anne. “Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement.” 2013. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Schmidt RA. Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03142013-164523/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Schmidt RA. Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2013. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03142013-164523/ ;

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