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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("John Compton"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Cunningham, Sarah Bainter. The Compass of Reason: Intellectual Interest in the Beautiful as a Mode of Orientation.

Degree: PhD, Philosophy, 2004, Vanderbilt University

Kantâs Critique of Judgment discusses reflective judgment as a faculty that mediates the concept of nature and freedom. The dissertation provides a detailed exploration of the concept of intellectual interest as a significant moment of reflective thinking, a moment unexamined by secondary literature on Kant. In Chapter I, I provide an overview of my examination of intellectual interest. Chapter II, Overview of Judgment, explains the basic characteristics of aesthetic judgment in order to provide a foundation for exploring taste in greater technical detail. Chapter III, Review of the Literature, examines the work of Paul Guyer, Henry Allison, Dieter Henrich, Jean-Françoise Lyotard and Gregg Horowitz. This chapter situates intellectual interest within contemporary discourse on Kant. Chapter IV, Orientation: The Compass of Reason, examines the essay âWhat is Orientation in Thinking?â in order to depict the notion of cognitive orientation. Chapter V, Interest, provides a detailed exegesis of the Sections 41 and 42 of the third Critique. Chapter VI, Disinterest, Freedom and Negative Darstellung, uses the interpretation of intellectual interest to redefine disinterest as an occasion of the emergence of freedom. Chapter VII, Poetic Language: Giving Life to Concepts, examines Kantâs division of the arts in order to recognize poetry as the highest art. This chapter relates Kantâs comments on poetry back to the problem of language that haunts the third Critique, a problem that has emerged briefly in earlier chapters. Finally, Chapter VIII, Conclusion: The Trick, completes the exegesis of Section 42 by exploring how we might understand art in relation to intellectual interest. This chapter discusses disorientation in relation to reflective judgment and the implications of aesthetic failure in relation to cognition and morality. Advisors/Committee Members: Victor Anderson (committee member), David Wood (committee member), John Compton (committee member), John Lachs (committee member), Gregg M. Horowitz (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: orientation; freedom; trickery; art; poetry; judgment; intellectual interest; Kant; aesthetics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cunningham, S. B. (2004). The Compass of Reason: Intellectual Interest in the Beautiful as a Mode of Orientation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-11272004-172937/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cunningham, Sarah Bainter. “The Compass of Reason: Intellectual Interest in the Beautiful as a Mode of Orientation.” 2004. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-11272004-172937/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cunningham, Sarah Bainter. “The Compass of Reason: Intellectual Interest in the Beautiful as a Mode of Orientation.” 2004. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Cunningham SB. The Compass of Reason: Intellectual Interest in the Beautiful as a Mode of Orientation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2004. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-11272004-172937/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Cunningham SB. The Compass of Reason: Intellectual Interest in the Beautiful as a Mode of Orientation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2004. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-11272004-172937/ ;


Vanderbilt University

2. Jensen, Molly Hadley. "Fleshing" Out a Relational Ethics: Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Contributions to Ecological Feminism.

Degree: PhD, Religion, 2002, Vanderbilt University

Ecological feminists have identified a conceptual dualism in western philosophy and religion. According to their analyses, this dualism is a conceptual structure which supports gender, racial and ethnic oppression and the exploitation of the non-human beings. They argue that, within this dualism, the body is denigrated as inferior to and separate from the mind. Although this critique of dualism invites an exploration of the relation between mind and body (also human and nature), ecological feminists want to avoid biological reductionism and holism. Maurice Merleau-Ponty and his notion of the âfleshâ is one understanding of the mind-body relation that can help ecological feminists formulate an alternative to dualism. Merleau-Pontyâs sense phenomenology and his axiom of the flesh, developed in the posthumously published The Visible and Invisible, describes sense perception and the language which emerges out of our senses as a reciprocity between body sensed and sensing. He argues that the mind is not separate from nor superior to the body, but that perceptions, concepts and language result from an intermingling of the sensed and sensing body. This understanding of the primacy and reciprocity of the senses suggests an ethics of relation in which bodies, particularly suffering bodies, have moral value. The ethical norms that emerge from the âfleshâ are relational and responsive to diverse beings and contexts. Some of these norms include interdepence, mutuality, diversity and flourishing. These norms correspond with and contribute to ecological feminist ethics. Since the ethical norms are rooted in bodies and their relations, Merleau-Ponty recovers the ethical potency of bodies. His âfleshâ supports the understanding of the body as a site of resistance. Judith Butler, Jeffner Allen, Luce Irigaray and other feminists have appropriated elements of Merleau-Pontyâs work to resist oppressive cultural identities. Ecological feminists can also draw on the âfleshâ to resist and transform dualism. Advisors/Committee Members: John Compton (committee member), Paul R. Dokecki (committee member), Howard Harrod (chair), Mary McClintock-Fulkerson (chair), Gay House Welch (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: ecological feminism; flesh; merleau-ponty; ecological ethics; sense experience; body

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jensen, M. H. (2002). "Fleshing" Out a Relational Ethics: Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Contributions to Ecological Feminism. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/theses/available/etd-1205102-125846/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jensen, Molly Hadley. “"Fleshing" Out a Relational Ethics: Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Contributions to Ecological Feminism.” 2002. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed December 06, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/theses/available/etd-1205102-125846/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jensen, Molly Hadley. “"Fleshing" Out a Relational Ethics: Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Contributions to Ecological Feminism.” 2002. Web. 06 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Jensen MH. "Fleshing" Out a Relational Ethics: Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Contributions to Ecological Feminism. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2002. [cited 2019 Dec 06]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/theses/available/etd-1205102-125846/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Jensen MH. "Fleshing" Out a Relational Ethics: Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Contributions to Ecological Feminism. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2002. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/theses/available/etd-1205102-125846/ ;

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