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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Fei Ye"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Fan, Run. Development of prognostic model for breast cancer in Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS).

Degree: MS, Biostatistics, 2015, Vanderbilt University

We developed prognostic models to predict five-year overall survival (OS), ten-year overall survival (OS), and five-year relapse-free survival (RFS) from Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS). SBCSS is a large, population-based cohort study of 4,858 female breast cancer patients aged 20 to 75 years at diagnoses. Patients were recruited between March 2002 and April 2006 and were followed up through December 2012. In addition to patients' demographic, clinical, pathological, treatment information, our model incorporates novel modifiable lifestyle information. Number of events of five-year OS, ten-year OS, and five-year RFS model is 535 (11.0%), 950 (19.6%), and 845 (17.4%). Missing outcome and variables were completed by single and multiple imputation to reduce bias and increase precision. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was developed for each survival outcome. Performance of the models was assessed by both discrimination and calibration. We internally validated our models using the .632 bootstrap method with 200 repetitions. Identical modeling procedures were repeated on these datasets. C-statistics of the full model was 0.754, 0.725, and 0.717 for five-year OS, ten-year OS, and five-year RFS, respectively. To further simplify full model for routine practice, model approximation was performed using backward step down method. We built a novel prognostic prediction model among Asian women. Comparing to existing prognostic tools, we expanded the model by incorporating lifestyle predictors, PR and HER2 status. 5-yr OS, 10-yr OS, and 5-yr RFS can be predicted accurately with good calibration and discrimination. Advisors/Committee Members: Tatsuki Koyama (committee member), Fei Ye (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: prediction; breast cancer; modeling

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fan, R. (2015). Development of prognostic model for breast cancer in Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS). (Thesis). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13145

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fan, Run. “Development of prognostic model for breast cancer in Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS).” 2015. Thesis, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13145.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fan, Run. “Development of prognostic model for breast cancer in Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS).” 2015. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Fan R. Development of prognostic model for breast cancer in Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS). [Internet] [Thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13145.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Fan R. Development of prognostic model for breast cancer in Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study (SBCSS). [Thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13145

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Vanderbilt University

2. Michels, Kara Ann. Uterine Fibroid Severity in Pregnancy.

Degree: PhD, Epidemiology, 2014, Vanderbilt University

Uterine fibroids are benign tumors associated with an increased risk of irregular vaginal bleeding and abdominal pain. Disease severity can be described in the context of total fibroid volume, number of tumors, and growth of tumors. Despite more than one-in-ten pregnant women being affected by fibroids, the influence of increasing disease severity on symptoms is not well described among this population. Data from a prospective pregnancy cohort (Right from the Start: A study of early pregnancy health, 2000-2012) were used to show that non-linear relationships between total fibroid volume and the risks for bleeding and pain in the first trimester exist—and that these relationships differ by maternal race. Increasing number of tumors increased risk of self-reported pain and pain with bleeding. Longitudinal models were used to identify maternal and fibroid characteristics associated with fibroid growth during pregnancy. As in previous studies, increases in disease severity (increases in total fibroid volume), were noted for many women at the beginning of pregnancy, regardless of race. Nulliparity and first trimester bleeding and pain were possible risk factors for growth in total volume and number of tumors—suggesting that experiencing symptoms may be indicative of fibroid formation or growth. Advisors/Committee Members: Katherine E. Hartmann (committee member), Kristin R. Archer (committee member), Fei Ye (committee member), Digna R. Velez Edwards (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: leiomyoma; multilevel; obstetrics; polytomous logistic regression; southeast

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Michels, K. A. (2014). Uterine Fibroid Severity in Pregnancy. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13832

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Michels, Kara Ann. “Uterine Fibroid Severity in Pregnancy.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13832.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Michels, Kara Ann. “Uterine Fibroid Severity in Pregnancy.” 2014. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Michels KA. Uterine Fibroid Severity in Pregnancy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13832.

Council of Science Editors:

Michels KA. Uterine Fibroid Severity in Pregnancy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13832


Vanderbilt University

3. Baglia, Michelle Lynn. Germline and Somatic Variation in Genes Involved in Metabolism of Chemotherapy Drugs and Breast Cancer Outcomes.

Degree: PhD, Epidemiology, 2016, Vanderbilt University

Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which is characterized by minimal or lack of expression of estrogen receptors and progesterone receptors, and the absence of overexpression of human epidermal growth factor 2 (ER-/PR-/HER2-), makes up 15%-20% of breast cancers in the United States. Although there have been recent advances in breast cancer detection/treatment leading to improved survival overall, the prognosis for TNBC patients is much worse compared to other breast cancer types. Chemotherapy is the standard treatment for TNBC patients but patient response to treatment varies tremendously. Understanding the underlying molecular biological mechanisms is critical to improve outcomes for this group of aggressive breast cancers. Using resources available from the Shanghai Breast Cancer Survival Study, we evaluated the association between germline and somatic variation in chemotherapy metabolizing genes and breast cancer outcomes. Our study focused on genes involved in the metabolism of cyclophosphamide and 5-fluorouracil, the two most commonly used chemotherapy agents in our study population. Using a gene score approach, we evaluated the separate and joint association of germline polymorphisms and tumor-level gene expression with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) using Cox models. No association between the cyclophosphamide polymorphism score and DFS or OS was observed. The 5-fluorouracil polymorphism score was associated with marginally improved OS, particularly among those who took 5-fluorouracil. The cyclophosphamide gene expression score was associated with OS among all participants for events occurring in the first three years following breast cancer diagnosis. The 5-fluorouracil gene expression score was associated with worse DFS among all participants for events occurring in the first three years following cancer diagnosis. No association was observed for the joint effect of the polymorphism score and the gene expression score for either chemotherapy drug. However, our study had a low statistical power to investigate the joint effect. Future studies with larger sample size are needed to further elucidate the roles of genes involved in the pathways by which chemotherapy drugs are metabolized to understand the biology of chemotherapy responses. Advisors/Committee Members: Fei Ye (committee member), Sarah Nechuta (committee member), Jirong Long (committee member), Xiao-Ou Shu (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: chemotherapy; drug metabolism; survival; breast cancer

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Baglia, M. L. (2016). Germline and Somatic Variation in Genes Involved in Metabolism of Chemotherapy Drugs and Breast Cancer Outcomes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10714

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baglia, Michelle Lynn. “Germline and Somatic Variation in Genes Involved in Metabolism of Chemotherapy Drugs and Breast Cancer Outcomes.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 16, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10714.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baglia, Michelle Lynn. “Germline and Somatic Variation in Genes Involved in Metabolism of Chemotherapy Drugs and Breast Cancer Outcomes.” 2016. Web. 16 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Baglia ML. Germline and Somatic Variation in Genes Involved in Metabolism of Chemotherapy Drugs and Breast Cancer Outcomes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10714.

Council of Science Editors:

Baglia ML. Germline and Somatic Variation in Genes Involved in Metabolism of Chemotherapy Drugs and Breast Cancer Outcomes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10714

.