Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Edward Friedman"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Vanderbilt University

1. Wenz, Steven Benjamin. Continuity and Change: National Identity in Twenty-First-Century Argentine Culture.

Degree: PhD, Spanish and Portuguese, 2016, Vanderbilt University

This dissertation studies the representation of national identity in twenty-first-century Argentine culture. I examine how and to what extent the 2001 economic and political crisis, often understood as a turning point in the country’s history, has affected discussions of Argentina’s role in the world and of what it means to be Argentine. Through a study of texts produced during the period from 2003 to 2014, I argue that both change and continuity have characterized the representation of national identity over the last decade. New interpretations of the country’s identity, which flourished in the climate of self-reflection that followed the crisis, exist alongside conceptions of the nation that have their roots in the nineteenth century. My analysis centers on socioeconomic and “racial” identification. I contend that, although the 2001 collapse undermined the notion of Argentina as “Europe in South America,” highlighting the country’s structural and cultural connections with the rest of the subcontinent, the long-standing notion of a stable, middle-class Argentina retains its symbolic power. In similar fashion, I find that, although the events of 2001 opened up a space for historically marginalized groups, such as Afro-Argentines and indigenous peoples, to demand increased visibility in the national imagined community, the Eurocentric view of Argentina remains prevalent. I reach these conclusions by examining multiple forms of media and different spheres of society: novels and short stories by the contemporary authors Ariel Bermani, Patricio Pron, and Washington Cucurto; television commercials and promotional videos for the Argentine national soccer team; and tourist industry materials and a literary anthology from the Northwest region of Argentina, strongly associated with indigenous heritage. Advisors/Committee Members: Ruth Hill (committee member), Jane Landers (committee member), Edward Friedman (committee member), Earl Fitz (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Argentine novel; Argentine literature; Argentina

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wenz, S. B. (2016). Continuity and Change: National Identity in Twenty-First-Century Argentine Culture. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12749

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wenz, Steven Benjamin. “Continuity and Change: National Identity in Twenty-First-Century Argentine Culture.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12749.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wenz, Steven Benjamin. “Continuity and Change: National Identity in Twenty-First-Century Argentine Culture.” 2016. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Wenz SB. Continuity and Change: National Identity in Twenty-First-Century Argentine Culture. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12749.

Council of Science Editors:

Wenz SB. Continuity and Change: National Identity in Twenty-First-Century Argentine Culture. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12749


Vanderbilt University

2. Infanger, Scott Ryan. Dying to Speak: Death and the Creation of a New Reader in the Latin American Novel.

Degree: PhD, Spanish and Portuguese, 2009, Vanderbilt University

In this study, I analyze Memórias Póstumas de Brás Cubas and Dom Casmurro by Machado de Assis, La amortajada and The Shrouded Woman by María Luisa Bombal, Juan Rulfo’s Pedro Páramo, and João Guimarães Rosa’s Grande Sertão: Veredas. The common theme of death and the solitary narrator/protagonist strengthens the links between Brazilian and Spanish American narrative traditions of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This study examines the way in which death functions as a literary trope that destroys the concept of the traditional reader and reconstructs him/her as an integral participant in the creation of the narrative. Relying on Barthes’s concept of “writerly” texts, I apply Wolfgang Iser’s theory of aesthetic response and Roberto González Echevarría’s theory of the Archive to explore the ways in which death appears in primarily first-person narratives in which the narrator/protagonist has either died and speaks/writes from the grave, or remains the only living character of the narrative. In each work, the reader is expected to abandon the conventions of literary realism by engaging the narrator/protagonist in a metafictional space within the narrative itself. As the reader enters the texts, s/he is encouraged to reevaluate the society represented in the narrative, as it is filtered through the narrator’s lens of death. This lens strips away the conventional wisdom and hegemonic discourse of the society portrayed in the novels. Each of the novels in this study presents its social order from a different perspective, but the common element of each work is the awakening that the narrator experiences through his or her association with death. In each of the works, the reader must “fill in” missing pieces of the text or decipher the speech acts of marginalized characters in order to understand the position and perspective of the narrator/protagonist. By doing so, the traditional reader “dies” as a newly constructed, more engaged reader is created. Advisors/Committee Members: Vera Kutzinski (committee member), Edward Friedman (committee member), Cathy Jrade (committee member), Earl E. Fitz (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: death in narrative; reader response

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Infanger, S. R. (2009). Dying to Speak: Death and the Creation of a New Reader in the Latin American Novel. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15110

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Infanger, Scott Ryan. “Dying to Speak: Death and the Creation of a New Reader in the Latin American Novel.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15110.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Infanger, Scott Ryan. “Dying to Speak: Death and the Creation of a New Reader in the Latin American Novel.” 2009. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Infanger SR. Dying to Speak: Death and the Creation of a New Reader in the Latin American Novel. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15110.

Council of Science Editors:

Infanger SR. Dying to Speak: Death and the Creation of a New Reader in the Latin American Novel. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/15110

.