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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Dr. Thomas E. Yankeelov"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Barnes, Stephanie Lynne. Interrogation of the Limitations and Capabilities of the Model-Gel-Tissue Assay and Application to Soft Tissue Modulus Evaluation.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2011, Vanderbilt University

The correlation between changes in mechanical properties and the onset of disease has led to an increased interest in assessing the elastic modulus of soft tissues as a biomarker for disease progression. In addition, soft tissue mechanical properties are desired for biomechanical modeling for surgical procedure planning and intraoperative guidance. Unfortunately, soft tissue modulus evaluation has proven inherently difficult due to tissue consistency and shape, and the approaches are highly variant. The work presented in this thesis focuses on the development, application, and interrogation of a novel soft tissue mechanical property evaluation technique, termed the Model-Gel-Tissue (MGT) assay, which utilizes a combination of a gel embedding process, direct mechanical testing, and computational modeling to analyze the elastic properties of a soft tissue sample. The goal was to develop a repeatable and adaptable evaluation technique that also allowed for irregularly shaped specimens and standardization of the implementation. This was accomplished by a rapid-embedding of the tissue in a gel with surfaces of known and uniform shape. The mechanical testing output is then utilized in a finite element model of the system developed from computed tomography (CT) scans of the specimen, in order to evaluate the mechanical properties of the embedded tissue. Preliminary testing of the MGT assay was implemented using fibrotic murine livers to assess the capability of the technique relative to traditional indentation testing. The assay was then used to investigate the correlation between microstructural collagen content and macroscopic tissue modulus in a murine model of breast cancer. Subsequently, the assay was used to investigate the propensity of modulus as an indicator of treatment resistance in a second murine model of breast cancer. Finally, extensive sensitivity tests were performed to qualify the fidelity of the system. The results of this work show that modulus assessment via the MGT assay correlates to traditional testing, as well as to tissue collagen content, and the concatenation of the work indicates that the MGT assay serves as a reliable and adaptable soft tissue modulus evaluation system. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Michael I. Miga (chair), Dr. John C. Gore (committee member), Dr. Robert J. Roselli (committee member), Dr. Alissa M. Weaver (committee member), Dr. Thomas E. Yankeelov (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: finite element modeling; mechanical properties; young's modulus; elastic modulus; material testing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Barnes, S. L. (2011). Interrogation of the Limitations and Capabilities of the Model-Gel-Tissue Assay and Application to Soft Tissue Modulus Evaluation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03242011-144611/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Barnes, Stephanie Lynne. “Interrogation of the Limitations and Capabilities of the Model-Gel-Tissue Assay and Application to Soft Tissue Modulus Evaluation.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 07, 2020. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03242011-144611/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Barnes, Stephanie Lynne. “Interrogation of the Limitations and Capabilities of the Model-Gel-Tissue Assay and Application to Soft Tissue Modulus Evaluation.” 2011. Web. 07 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Barnes SL. Interrogation of the Limitations and Capabilities of the Model-Gel-Tissue Assay and Application to Soft Tissue Modulus Evaluation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. [cited 2020 Apr 07]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03242011-144611/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Barnes SL. Interrogation of the Limitations and Capabilities of the Model-Gel-Tissue Assay and Application to Soft Tissue Modulus Evaluation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03242011-144611/ ;


Vanderbilt University

2. Loveless, Mary Elizabeth. High resolution ultrasonic vessel imaging and repeatability of blood flow modeling using an ultrasound contrast agent.

Degree: MS, Biomedical Engineering, 2007, Vanderbilt University

Cancer is a complex and adaptable disease, and knowledge of the mechanisms that cause its progression is vital to creating and monitoring anti-cancer therapies. As a tumor grows beyond a few mm3, blood vessels are recruited to provide additional nutrients in a process called angiogenesis. Some novel drug therapies specifically target this process, and the efficacy of these drugs can in principle be monitored by a technique called angiography. 3D angiography, a method of imaging the vasculature, can be performed by several imaging modalities typically with the use of a contrast agent. A technique is introduced which uses high resolution ultrasound in conjunction with an ultrasound contrast agent to produce 3D images of the vasculature. This method offers a faster, more accessible, and cheaper alternative to assess the efficacy of anti-angiogenic drugs in preclinical cancer models. In addition to vessel imaging, modeling the kinetic behavior of the contrast agent in the vasculature can elucidate parameters such as blood flow, which can also serve as an indicator of drug treatment efficacy. The repeatability of a commonly used mono-exponential model is assessed in order to determine thresholds for inter/intra-subject error. The 3D vessel imaging technique presented in this thesis correlated with other measures of blood flow (r = 0.55 ± 0.04, p < 0.01) and shows an increased sensitivity to microvasculature within tumors. Also, preliminary repeatability analysis (n = 6) on the modeling parameter which is proportional to contrast agent velocity shows a mean difference of 0.061 ± 0.298 between independent measurements, and the limits of agreement range from -0.536 and 0.656. The developments exhibited provide additional methods for monitoring longitudinal anti-angiogenic cancer treatments in preclinical models. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Thomas E. Yankeelov (chair), Dr. John C. Gore (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Cancer  – Ultrasonic imaging; Blood-vessels  – Ultrasonic imaging; vessel imaging; Contrast-enhanced ultrasound; cancer; Neovascularization

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Loveless, M. E. (2007). High resolution ultrasonic vessel imaging and repeatability of blood flow modeling using an ultrasound contrast agent. (Masters Thesis). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12072007-103700/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Loveless, Mary Elizabeth. “High resolution ultrasonic vessel imaging and repeatability of blood flow modeling using an ultrasound contrast agent.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 07, 2020. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12072007-103700/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Loveless, Mary Elizabeth. “High resolution ultrasonic vessel imaging and repeatability of blood flow modeling using an ultrasound contrast agent.” 2007. Web. 07 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Loveless ME. High resolution ultrasonic vessel imaging and repeatability of blood flow modeling using an ultrasound contrast agent. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2007. [cited 2020 Apr 07]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12072007-103700/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Loveless ME. High resolution ultrasonic vessel imaging and repeatability of blood flow modeling using an ultrasound contrast agent. [Masters Thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2007. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-12072007-103700/ ;

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