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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Dr. Ronald W. Zimmer"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Stern, Jonathan Michael Bradley. Educational Privatization in the 21st Century: A Global Framework for Understanding Non-government Schools.

Degree: PhD, Leadership and Policy Studies, 2014, Vanderbilt University

The purpose of this dissertation is to examine the shifting trends in the provision and funding of non-government schools in developing countries over the past 20 years, with an emphasis on the rise of low-cost private schools. As a result of recent changes in governmental support to public schooling and increases in low-fee private enrollment rates, it is necessary to examine not only the cross-country factors that impact private enrollments but also the quality of the low-cost sector that has become so prominent in many developing countries. Accordingly, this dissertation addresses each of these issues via three distinct but related papers. The first paper provides an updated and expanded analysis of Estelle James' pioneering work on why countries have different mixes of public-private provision of primary and secondary education. Counter to Jamesâ findings, I hypothesize that as a result of Education for All initiatives across the globe, public spending is no longer predictive of private enrollment rates. In addition, this paper finds differences across levels of development and therefore seeks to determine the level of economic development at which we begin to see changes in predictors of private enrollment rates. In order to illustrate the demand for quality in developing countries, the second paper provides an analysis of the quality of the private secondary education sector in Brazilâoverall, as well as by level of tuition. This paper uses data from the state of Sao Paulo in order to assess the impact of private schools by analyzing differences in academic outcomes (e.g. end of high school exams) between public-private transfers and public school âstayersâ. The third paper examines the private school sector in Indonesia – a country that follows a less traditional model for private school financing and monitoring. By incorporating 2009 PISA results with findings from fieldwork conducted in Indonesia in 2010, this paper provides a new perspective on the impact of (low-cost) private schools in a country with large private secondary enrollments and a highly subsidized private education sector. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Stephen P. Heyneman (chair), Dr. William R. Doyle (committee member), Dr. Ronald W. Zimmer (committee member), Dr. Kathryn H. Anderson (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: low-cost private schools; education policy; privatization; international education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stern, J. M. B. (2014). Educational Privatization in the 21st Century: A Global Framework for Understanding Non-government Schools. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03202014-135910/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stern, Jonathan Michael Bradley. “Educational Privatization in the 21st Century: A Global Framework for Understanding Non-government Schools.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03202014-135910/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stern, Jonathan Michael Bradley. “Educational Privatization in the 21st Century: A Global Framework for Understanding Non-government Schools.” 2014. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Stern JMB. Educational Privatization in the 21st Century: A Global Framework for Understanding Non-government Schools. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03202014-135910/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Stern JMB. Educational Privatization in the 21st Century: A Global Framework for Understanding Non-government Schools. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03202014-135910/ ;

2. Schmidt, Rebecca Anne. Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement.

Degree: PhD, Leadership and Policy Studies, 2013, Vanderbilt University

This project uses a large multi-state dataset to address three aspects of the relationship between tracking and student achievement that have been understudied. Chapter II establishes that rigorous instruction is substantially more common in high track classes. Rigorous instruction is defined as teaching that emphasizes justification and reasoning, and thus this gap between track levels represents a rationing of high status knowledge. However, this type of instruction only mediates a small proportion of the relationship between track level and achievement on state achievement tests. Chapter III finds that a developmental view of ability is significantly associated with student achievement. This conception of ability sees all students as capable of rigorous mathematics with the correct supports. Students in untracked settings whose teachers describe continuing to include low-achieving students in rigorous mathematics are predicted to out-score tracked students. Chapter IV shows that one support for low-achieving students outside the regular classroom, double dose instruction, can actually negatively impact their achievement, depending on the characteristics of the program. While some characteristics were associated with positive student achievement, only four schools employed these characteristics. In conclusion, I argue that each of these analyses provides a small window into policy and research direction for the future. If schools wish to support all students to succeed, they must emphasize rigorous mathematics not just among the highest-achieving, advocate for a developmental view of ability that sees all students as capable of success in this type of mathematics, and consider how the implementation of supports for students can be as important as the adoption of the supports as policy. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Kara Jackson (committee member), Dr. Christopher Loss (committee member), Dr. Ronald W. Zimmer (committee member), Dr. Thomas Smith (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: instructional quality; IQA; teacher beliefs; achievement; ability; middle school; double dose; support class; support classes; supplemental class; tracking; mathematics; supplemental classes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schmidt, R. A. (2013). Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03142013-164523/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schmidt, Rebecca Anne. “Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed March 23, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03142013-164523/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schmidt, Rebecca Anne. “Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement.” 2013. Web. 23 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Schmidt RA. Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 23]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03142013-164523/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Schmidt RA. Unpacking tracking: the role of instruction, teacher beliefs and supplemental courses in the relationship between tracking and student achievement. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2013. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03142013-164523/ ;

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