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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Dr. John McLean"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Cognata, Andrew David. Electrochemical Instrumentation for Real-Time Monitoring of Biological Model Systems.

Degree: MS, Chemistry, 2016, Vanderbilt University

New technologies for model biological systems aid in drug development and toxicology by providing an in vitro environment that closely mimics in vivo conditions but require new instrumentation to meet needs in monitoring and analysis. Techniques adapted from the existing Multianalyte Microphysiometer, an instrument used for the quantitative analysis of cell metabolism, were applied in the optimization of a screen-printed platinum electrode platform capable of monitoring levels of glucose, lactate, oxygen, and solution acidification in complex mixtures such as cell medium for integration into biological model systems. Various modifications including enzyme and metal films provide sensitivity and selectivity to the electrodes. Improvements were made in the function of the screen-printed electrode platform and preliminary steps in the integration of the electrodes with a hollow-fiber bioreactor intended to simulate the environment of the blood-brain barrier were performed. Challenges in the interfacing of biological model systems with fundamentally unsterile instruments are identified and addressed. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. David Cliffel (Committee Chair), Dr. John McLean (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: multianalyte microphysiometer; enzyme electrodes; blood-brain barrier; bioreactor; electrochemistry

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cognata, A. D. (2016). Electrochemical Instrumentation for Real-Time Monitoring of Biological Model Systems. (Thesis). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11654

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cognata, Andrew David. “Electrochemical Instrumentation for Real-Time Monitoring of Biological Model Systems.” 2016. Thesis, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11654.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cognata, Andrew David. “Electrochemical Instrumentation for Real-Time Monitoring of Biological Model Systems.” 2016. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Cognata AD. Electrochemical Instrumentation for Real-Time Monitoring of Biological Model Systems. [Internet] [Thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11654.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cognata AD. Electrochemical Instrumentation for Real-Time Monitoring of Biological Model Systems. [Thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11654

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Vanderbilt University

2. McNees, Cynthia Ruth. New Methods to Induce and Detect Microbial Secondary Metabolite Production.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2015, Vanderbilt University

CHEMISTRY NEW METHODS TO INDUCE AND DETECT MICROBIAL SECONDARY METABOLITE PRODUCTION C. RUTH MCNEES Dissertation under the direction of Professor Brian O. Bachmann Secondary metabolite production by bacteria, particularly actinomycete, has been extensively investigated, traditionally in mono-culture conditions with specific medium recipes, in an effort to identify new chemical entities with clinical relevance. Given the significant amount of research in the area of microbial secondary metabolites, the rate of discovery of unreported compounds has significantly diminished, while the increase in resistant pathogens is posing a serious medical issue. To address this issue and increase the probability of isolating new chemical entities, a multitude of new methods have been developed and more are needed. Through the application of rational alterations of the medium components and analyzing the metabolic output through statistical analysis using model actinomycetes, the development of methods for inducing secondary metabolites through the use of rare earth elements, co-culture cultivation, and low dose antibiotics have been achieved. Expanding on the evaluation of the metabolic impact of antibiotics produced by bacteria led to the development of a new method, which combines the techniques of bioautography, thin layer chromatography, and bacterial imaging mass spectrometry, to evaluate the response of an assay organism following exposure to bioactive compounds with different modes of action. The result of which was the development of a method in which detection of compounds arrayed in a 2-D fashion, as well as, the metabolic impact on the assay organism. With this method, a variety of metabolic responses, many of which showed various ion intensities for compounds with differing modes of action were detected. Further development of the method facilitated the identification of a known compound, baumycin, within a crude actinomycete extract. Purification and isolation efforts of the compound resulted in the identification of a previously unreported analogue. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Gary Sulikowski (committee member), Dr. John McLean (committee member), Dr. Alan Brash (committee member), Dr. Bian Bachmann (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: co-culture; imaging mass spectrometry; Natural products; actinomycete; secondary metabolites

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McNees, C. R. (2015). New Methods to Induce and Detect Microbial Secondary Metabolite Production. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12239

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McNees, Cynthia Ruth. “New Methods to Induce and Detect Microbial Secondary Metabolite Production.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12239.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McNees, Cynthia Ruth. “New Methods to Induce and Detect Microbial Secondary Metabolite Production.” 2015. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

McNees CR. New Methods to Induce and Detect Microbial Secondary Metabolite Production. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12239.

Council of Science Editors:

McNees CR. New Methods to Induce and Detect Microbial Secondary Metabolite Production. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12239


Vanderbilt University

3. Davis, Keersten Michelle. Development of Rapid Immunoassays for Improved Point-of-Care Malaria Diagnostics.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2015, Vanderbilt University

Delivery of diagnostic tools to low-resource settings under the burden of the malaria epidemic faces numerous challenges. These underdeveloped areas are often characterized by poverty, absent or intermittent electricity, hot and humid environmental conditions as well as a lack of skilled clinicians. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) were developed to circumvent these challenges in the form of a low-cost, rapid, easy to use test. Despite the many advantages of RDTs, the changing climate of infectious disease education, prevention, and treatment has brought to light the areas in which these tests can be improved to detect asymptomatic patients. This work outlines the development of two parallel assays for detection of asymptomatic malaria. First, Ni(II)NTA magnetic particles were employed to extract, purify, and concentrate the most common malarial biomarker, Plasmodium falciparum Histidine Rich Protein II (pfHRPII), from a blood sample, in less than 30 minutes. Application of this concentrated protein to commercially available RDTs afforded a 4-fold enhancement in performance, into the single parasite/µL detection regime. While integration of new sample preparation methods with existing technologies represents one approach toward infectious disease elimination, a unique, rapid immunomagnetic on-bead ELISA for pfHRPII detection was also developed, as an alternative strategy for malaria diagnosis. In less than 30 minutes, a full sandwich ELISA was complete for the detection of single parasites/µL. Effecting a change in low-resource diagnostics and global healthcare may not necessarily require a complete reworking of the system, but simply using innovation to make the existing constructs work better. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Frederick Haselton (committee member), Dr. Janet Macdonald (committee member), Dr. John McLean (committee member), Dr. David Wright (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: histidine rich protein; diagnostics; ELISA; immunoassay; malaria

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Davis, K. M. (2015). Development of Rapid Immunoassays for Improved Point-of-Care Malaria Diagnostics. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12996

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Davis, Keersten Michelle. “Development of Rapid Immunoassays for Improved Point-of-Care Malaria Diagnostics.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12996.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Davis, Keersten Michelle. “Development of Rapid Immunoassays for Improved Point-of-Care Malaria Diagnostics.” 2015. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Davis KM. Development of Rapid Immunoassays for Improved Point-of-Care Malaria Diagnostics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12996.

Council of Science Editors:

Davis KM. Development of Rapid Immunoassays for Improved Point-of-Care Malaria Diagnostics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12996

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