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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Dr. Andres Zamora"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Garcia-Fernandez, Anton. Rogues in Dialogue: The Literature of Roguery in Spain and England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.

Degree: PhD, Spanish, 2011, Vanderbilt University

After the groundbreaking invention of the printing press, which led to the creation of a burgeoning literary market, the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries saw an exceptional increase in the production of literature about criminals and the underworld across Europe. This was particularly intense in the cases of England, with the appearance of popular genres such as the jest-book and the rogue pamphlet, and Spain, where picaresque literature, a genre that is instrumental to the study of the history of the novel, first came to fruition. This dissertation explores the intertextual dialogue in which English and Spanish authors of rogue texts engaged in the early modern period. The study attempts to integrate the English and Spanish traditions under the all-inclusive umbrella term of “rogue literature,” which will facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of two traditions that would prove highly influential even into the present day. In all the texts considered here, the authors create diverse and often antithetical images of the literary figure of the rogue that are decisively influenced by considerations such as each author’s ideology, literary conception, and political agenda. Moreover, this study analyzes the different ways in which Spanish writers of rogue literature introduced elements akin to those found in English rogue pamphlets into their works, reworking and modifying them in order to suit their own purposes. By taking two disparate Spanish picaresque texts—Miguel de Cervantes’s exemplary novella Rinconete y Cortadillo (1613) and Dr. Carlos García’s lesser-known La desordenada codicia de los bienes ajenos (1619)—as cases in point, the dissertation integrates two literary traditions that can be more thoroughly understood when viewed in the light of one another. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Cathy L. Jrade (committee member), Dr. Andres Zamora Juarez (committee member), Dr. Mark L. Schoenfield (committee member), Dr. Edward H. Friedman (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Spanish Literature; English Literature; Rogue Literature; Picaresque Literature; Miguel de Cervantes; Doctor Carlos Garcia; Thomas Harman; John Awdeley; Robert Greene; Gilbert Walker; Jest-Books; Rogue Pamphlets; Early Modern Literature; Sixteenth Century; Seventeenth Century

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garcia-Fernandez, A. (2011). Rogues in Dialogue: The Literature of Roguery in Spain and England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14407

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garcia-Fernandez, Anton. “Rogues in Dialogue: The Literature of Roguery in Spain and England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14407.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garcia-Fernandez, Anton. “Rogues in Dialogue: The Literature of Roguery in Spain and England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries.” 2011. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Garcia-Fernandez A. Rogues in Dialogue: The Literature of Roguery in Spain and England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14407.

Council of Science Editors:

Garcia-Fernandez A. Rogues in Dialogue: The Literature of Roguery in Spain and England in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14407


Vanderbilt University

2. Bauer, Rachel Noël. Madness and Laughter: Cervantes's Comic Vision in Don Quixote.

Degree: PhD, Spanish, 2007, Vanderbilt University

This study examines the comic vision of Miguel de Cervantes as manifested in his masterpiece, Don Quixote de la Mancha. Employing theories stemming principally from Mikhail Bakhtin and Michel Foucault, I look at how Cervantes creates humor in his novel and how, in turn, his novel fits into the long tradition of comic literature. The heart of this study is Cervantes’s use of carnivalesque laughter and how it showcases the various cultural identities related to the Spanish Baroque. I focus on reading Don Quixote as forming part of the history of Menippean satire and likewise its relationship to carnivalesque humor. This type of humor intimates the defense of a different type of world that is not dominated by one particular identity or power (whether political, philosophical, religious, or even literary) and as a result is destabilizing in nature. Journey is an essential characteristic to both carnivalesque laughter and Menippean satire, because it necessitates displacement as well as creates spaces for the mixing and clashing of identities. Because it is also a central motif throughout Don Quixote, I examine its effect on the text and how it functions to create different types of humor. The Avellaneda-Cervantes dynamic is another important aspect in understanding the direction of comicality in Don Quixote, in that Cervantes’s humor was multi-directional whereas Avellaneda’s tended to accentuate laughter emanating from the top down. Avellaneda represents the type of humor associated with hierarchy and power whereas Cervantes’s has leveled the playing field. I not only analyze the authors’ differences with regard to comic strategies, but emphasize the importance of reading both works in order to better understand how Cervantes’s comic vision incorporates carnivalesque laughter and therefore enriches his text. The relationship between madness and laughter is another avenue of discussion in this study and I investigate the historical and ethical dimensions of laughter, especially with regard to madness from the vantage point of Erasmus and Humanism. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Earl Fitz (committee member), Dr. Andres Zamora (committee member), Dr. William Franke (committee member), Dr. Edward H. Friedman (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: laughter; madness; Don Quixote; Cervantes; Carnival; Renaissance; Baroque; journey; Menippean; satire; Avellaneda

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bauer, R. N. (2007). Madness and Laughter: Cervantes's Comic Vision in Don Quixote. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14999

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bauer, Rachel Noël. “Madness and Laughter: Cervantes's Comic Vision in Don Quixote.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 17, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14999.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bauer, Rachel Noël. “Madness and Laughter: Cervantes's Comic Vision in Don Quixote.” 2007. Web. 17 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Bauer RN. Madness and Laughter: Cervantes's Comic Vision in Don Quixote. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2007. [cited 2021 Apr 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14999.

Council of Science Editors:

Bauer RN. Madness and Laughter: Cervantes's Comic Vision in Don Quixote. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14999

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