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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Doug Mortlock"). Showing records 1 – 7 of 7 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Rinker, David C. Transcriptional profiling and functional modeling of the chemosensory appendages of anopheles gambiae.

Degree: PhD, Human Genetics, 2015, Vanderbilt University

 Mosquitoes are vectors of many human diseases. The vectorial capacity of mosquitoes is directly a consequence of olfactory driven, host seeking behaviors. Olfaction in mosquitoes… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: olfaction; RNA-seq; transcriptomics; host-seeking; oviposition; malaria; modeling; mosquito; computational biology; bioinformatics; Anopheles

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APA (6th Edition):

Rinker, D. C. (2015). Transcriptional profiling and functional modeling of the chemosensory appendages of anopheles gambiae. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14696

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rinker, David C. “Transcriptional profiling and functional modeling of the chemosensory appendages of anopheles gambiae.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14696.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rinker, David C. “Transcriptional profiling and functional modeling of the chemosensory appendages of anopheles gambiae.” 2015. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Rinker DC. Transcriptional profiling and functional modeling of the chemosensory appendages of anopheles gambiae. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14696.

Council of Science Editors:

Rinker DC. Transcriptional profiling and functional modeling of the chemosensory appendages of anopheles gambiae. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14696


Vanderbilt University

2. Halstead, Angela Marie. Dissecting the spatiotemporal regulation of nodal signaling and its role as a morphogenetic cue.

Degree: PhD, Cell and Developmental Biology, 2014, Vanderbilt University

 The TGF-â ligand Nodal is a key regulator of body axis formation and patterning in the developing vertebrate embryo. How the Nodal signaling pathway is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Left-right patterning; Transcriptional regulation; Foxh1; Nodal; Groucho; Embryonic patterning

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APA (6th Edition):

Halstead, A. M. (2014). Dissecting the spatiotemporal regulation of nodal signaling and its role as a morphogenetic cue. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14382

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Halstead, Angela Marie. “Dissecting the spatiotemporal regulation of nodal signaling and its role as a morphogenetic cue.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14382.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Halstead, Angela Marie. “Dissecting the spatiotemporal regulation of nodal signaling and its role as a morphogenetic cue.” 2014. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Halstead AM. Dissecting the spatiotemporal regulation of nodal signaling and its role as a morphogenetic cue. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14382.

Council of Science Editors:

Halstead AM. Dissecting the spatiotemporal regulation of nodal signaling and its role as a morphogenetic cue. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14382


Vanderbilt University

3. Simonti, Corinne Nicole. Leveraging Biobanks and PheWAS to Uncover the Health Consequences of Recent Human Evolution.

Degree: PhD, Human Genetics, 2017, Vanderbilt University

 The genomics era has seen a staggering increase in the number of whole genome sequences. This has bolstered studies of human populations, and revealed regions… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: PheWAS; Biobank; Neanderthal; Evolution

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APA (6th Edition):

Simonti, C. N. (2017). Leveraging Biobanks and PheWAS to Uncover the Health Consequences of Recent Human Evolution. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11256

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Simonti, Corinne Nicole. “Leveraging Biobanks and PheWAS to Uncover the Health Consequences of Recent Human Evolution.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11256.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Simonti, Corinne Nicole. “Leveraging Biobanks and PheWAS to Uncover the Health Consequences of Recent Human Evolution.” 2017. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Simonti CN. Leveraging Biobanks and PheWAS to Uncover the Health Consequences of Recent Human Evolution. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11256.

Council of Science Editors:

Simonti CN. Leveraging Biobanks and PheWAS to Uncover the Health Consequences of Recent Human Evolution. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11256


Vanderbilt University

4. Bennett, Jeffrey Scott. A biphasic role for the voltage-gated sodium channel scn5Lab in cardiac development of zebrafish.

Degree: PhD, Human Genetics, 2013, Vanderbilt University

 A BIPHASIC ROLE FOR THE VOLTAGE-GATED SODIUM CHANNEL SCN5LAB IN CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT OF ZEBRAFISH JEFFREY S. BENNETT Dissertation under direction of Professor Dan M. Roden,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: heart development; genetics; sodium channels; proliferation; zebrafish

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APA (6th Edition):

Bennett, J. S. (2013). A biphasic role for the voltage-gated sodium channel scn5Lab in cardiac development of zebrafish. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12607

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bennett, Jeffrey Scott. “A biphasic role for the voltage-gated sodium channel scn5Lab in cardiac development of zebrafish.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12607.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bennett, Jeffrey Scott. “A biphasic role for the voltage-gated sodium channel scn5Lab in cardiac development of zebrafish.” 2013. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Bennett JS. A biphasic role for the voltage-gated sodium channel scn5Lab in cardiac development of zebrafish. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12607.

Council of Science Editors:

Bennett JS. A biphasic role for the voltage-gated sodium channel scn5Lab in cardiac development of zebrafish. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12607


Vanderbilt University

5. Musser, Melissa Anne. Enteric nervous system deficits in the ganglionated bowel of Hirschsprung mouse models and patients.

Degree: PhD, Human Genetics, 2014, Vanderbilt University

 Hirschsprung disease, or congenital absence of ganglia in the distal intestine, occurs in approximately every 1 in 5000 live births. Although HSCR patients have the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Hirschsprung; enteric nervous system; neural crest; Sox10; Ret; Ednrb

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APA (6th Edition):

Musser, M. A. (2014). Enteric nervous system deficits in the ganglionated bowel of Hirschsprung mouse models and patients. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14756

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Musser, Melissa Anne. “Enteric nervous system deficits in the ganglionated bowel of Hirschsprung mouse models and patients.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14756.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Musser, Melissa Anne. “Enteric nervous system deficits in the ganglionated bowel of Hirschsprung mouse models and patients.” 2014. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Musser MA. Enteric nervous system deficits in the ganglionated bowel of Hirschsprung mouse models and patients. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14756.

Council of Science Editors:

Musser MA. Enteric nervous system deficits in the ganglionated bowel of Hirschsprung mouse models and patients. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14756


Vanderbilt University

6. Layer, Justin Harrison. Biochemical and genetic analyses of interactions between transactivators and TBP associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

Degree: PhD, Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, 2010, Vanderbilt University

 The goal of my dissertation project was to characterize interactions between the transactivator Rap1 and Taf subunits of the TFIID complex. This experimental problem falls… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: TFIID; RNA Polymerase II; Transcription; Transactivator; Yeast

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APA (6th Edition):

Layer, J. H. (2010). Biochemical and genetic analyses of interactions between transactivators and TBP associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14902

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Layer, Justin Harrison. “Biochemical and genetic analyses of interactions between transactivators and TBP associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14902.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Layer, Justin Harrison. “Biochemical and genetic analyses of interactions between transactivators and TBP associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.” 2010. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Layer JH. Biochemical and genetic analyses of interactions between transactivators and TBP associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14902.

Council of Science Editors:

Layer JH. Biochemical and genetic analyses of interactions between transactivators and TBP associated factors in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14902


Vanderbilt University

7. Neill, Meaghan Anne. Nitrogen Metabolism: Enzyme Expression and Protein Interactions in the Urea and Nitric Oxide Cycles.

Degree: PhD, Human Genetics, 2010, Vanderbilt University

 The urea cycle enzymes play an important role in the processing of nitrogen to urea and in producing endogenous nitric oxide by the citrulline-nitric oxide… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: mRNA expression; protein interactions; nitric oxide cycle; urea cycle; protein expression; nitrogen metabolism

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APA (6th Edition):

Neill, M. A. (2010). Nitrogen Metabolism: Enzyme Expression and Protein Interactions in the Urea and Nitric Oxide Cycles. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11764

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Neill, Meaghan Anne. “Nitrogen Metabolism: Enzyme Expression and Protein Interactions in the Urea and Nitric Oxide Cycles.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11764.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Neill, Meaghan Anne. “Nitrogen Metabolism: Enzyme Expression and Protein Interactions in the Urea and Nitric Oxide Cycles.” 2010. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Neill MA. Nitrogen Metabolism: Enzyme Expression and Protein Interactions in the Urea and Nitric Oxide Cycles. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11764.

Council of Science Editors:

Neill MA. Nitrogen Metabolism: Enzyme Expression and Protein Interactions in the Urea and Nitric Oxide Cycles. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/11764

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