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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("David J. Wasserstein"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Murrell, William Stephen Jr. Dragomans and Crusaders: The Role of Translators and Translation in the Medieval Eastern Mediterranean, 1098-1291.

Degree: PhD, History, 2018, Vanderbilt University

My dissertation project asks a simple question: how did the invading Franks navigate the multifaceted language barrier when they conquered, settled, and ruled Syria in the era of the crusades? This project explores the ways in which interpreters and translators facilitated intercultural contact between Muslims, Latin Christians, and Eastern Christians in Syria in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Employing a wide range of sources in Arabic, Latin, and Old French, I examine and uncover the role of translators and translation in five crucial arenas of contact: diplomacy, local administration, trade, pilgrimage, and scientific scholarship. Three central arguments echo throughout this study. First, because language barriers were ubiquitous in the medieval eastern Mediterranean, so were translators. They were not merely confined to contexts of diplomacy or scholarship; rather, they were integral to every sort of intercultural contact between Muslims, Franks, and local Christians. Second, translators were not only ubiquitous, they were exceptionally versatile. By bridging language barriers, translators always become more than mere linguistic intermediaries, functioning in various contexts as negotiators, tax collectors, brokers, guides, and administrators. Finally, because of their ubiquitous presence and their multifaceted involvement in Muslim-Frankish contact, I argue that translators and interpreters are indeed âagents of historyâ in the medieval eastern Mediterranean. That they are often absent in the medieval sources is not a testament to their insignificance but rather to their ubiquity in everyday life and their success in mediating complex language barriers in diplomacy, local administration, trade, pilgrimage, and scholarship. This research represents an original contribution to the history of the crusades, Mediterranean studies, and the history of translation. Advisors/Committee Members: David J. Wasserstein (chair), Leor Halevi (committee member), William Caferro (committee member), Richard McGregor (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Christianity; translators; interpreters; language; Islam

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APA (6th Edition):

Murrell, W. S. J. (2018). Dragomans and Crusaders: The Role of Translators and Translation in the Medieval Eastern Mediterranean, 1098-1291. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06132018-152833/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Murrell, William Stephen Jr. “Dragomans and Crusaders: The Role of Translators and Translation in the Medieval Eastern Mediterranean, 1098-1291.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06132018-152833/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Murrell, William Stephen Jr. “Dragomans and Crusaders: The Role of Translators and Translation in the Medieval Eastern Mediterranean, 1098-1291.” 2018. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Murrell WSJ. Dragomans and Crusaders: The Role of Translators and Translation in the Medieval Eastern Mediterranean, 1098-1291. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2018. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06132018-152833/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Murrell WSJ. Dragomans and Crusaders: The Role of Translators and Translation in the Medieval Eastern Mediterranean, 1098-1291. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2018. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06132018-152833/ ;


Vanderbilt University

2. Tamber-Rosenau, Caryn. Striking Women: Performance and Gender in the Hebrew Bible and Early Jewish Literature.

Degree: PhD, Religion, 2015, Vanderbilt University

In recent decades, feminist exegesis has had a profound and wide-ranging effect on biblical studies. Many scholars have treated the accounts of Jael in Judges 4 and 5 from a feminist perspective, examining the interplay of gender and violence in the story. Other scholars have done similar work for the Book of Judith, and a handful have taken a feminist look at Pseudo-Philoâs reimagining of Jael in Biblical Antiquities. In the last few years, a small number of scholars have begun to look at one or the other of these stories through the lens of queer theory. To date, however, no one has undertaken a systematic study, both text-centered and deeply engaged with queer-theoretical frameworks, of the motif of the woman-turned-warrior in ancient Jewish literature. This dissertation asks how the character of Judith and the two different portrayals of Jael play with the signifiers of gender and sexuality, also researching possible parallels for this play in Ancient Near Eastern and Greco-Roman literature. I also ask how gender interacts with the tone and goals of each book. I show that Judith and both Jaels were characters who did not closely resemble the feminine ideal of their time periods. I argue that âputting onâ the gender âfemaleâ and playing with the signs of womenâs sexuality allowed these characters to get in position to slay their respective enemies. In other words, their efficacy as assassins is directly tied to their performance of the feminine. This project advances the scholarship on Judith and the two Jaels regarding how gender and sexuality factor into the portrayals of the main characters and the resolution of their stories. More broadly, it provides a new understanding of how the âwoman warriorâ motif plays with conventional notions of sex and gender. Feminist interpretation has helped bring these characters out of the shadows, but it has not gone far enough. I employ promising methods of analysis derived from queer theoretical frameworks to shine new light on three strong female characters from the Hebrew Bible and the early days of Jewish literature. Advisors/Committee Members: Douglas A. Knight (committee member), Jack M. Sasson (committee member), Annalisa Azzoni (committee member), Herbert R. Marbury (committee member), David J. Wasserstein (committee member), Ellen T. Armour (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: women in the Bible; Biblical Antiquities; Pseudo-Philo; Book of Judges; Jael; Judith; Second Temple literature; queer theory; Hebrew Bible

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tamber-Rosenau, C. (2015). Striking Women: Performance and Gender in the Hebrew Bible and Early Jewish Literature. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03232015-094404/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tamber-Rosenau, Caryn. “Striking Women: Performance and Gender in the Hebrew Bible and Early Jewish Literature.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03232015-094404/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tamber-Rosenau, Caryn. “Striking Women: Performance and Gender in the Hebrew Bible and Early Jewish Literature.” 2015. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Tamber-Rosenau C. Striking Women: Performance and Gender in the Hebrew Bible and Early Jewish Literature. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03232015-094404/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Tamber-Rosenau C. Striking Women: Performance and Gender in the Hebrew Bible and Early Jewish Literature. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2015. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-03232015-094404/ ;


Vanderbilt University

3. Wheat, David. The Afro-Portuguese Maritime World and the Foundations of Spanish Caribbean Society, 1570-1640.

Degree: PhD, History, 2009, Vanderbilt University

This dissertation explores African and Portuguese roles in the rise of the Spanish Caribbean's most important port cities, with particular emphasis on Cartagena de Indias and Havana. During the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, Portuguese and Luso-African mariners, merchants, and immigrants linked the Spanish Caribbean to a broader Portuguese maritime world. This network's most significant outcome was the forced migration of tens of thousands of African captives, funneled to the Caribbean in overlapping waves from Upper Guinea, Lower Guinea, and West Central Africa. Spain's heavy reliance on sub-Saharan Africans and their descendants to populate and sustain key Caribbean seaports resulted in social transformations which often mirrored or directly responded to contemporary events in precolonial Western Africa. Rather than portraying the post-conquest Caribbean as a "backwater" within a historical framework that privileges Mexico or Peru, this study argues that the early colonial Caribbean may be more accurately viewed as an extension of the early modern South Atlantic world. Advisors/Committee Members: Jane G. Landers (chair), Marshall C. Eakin (committee member), Daniel H. Usner, Jr. (committee member), David J. Wasserstein (committee member), William R. Fowler (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: African Acculturation; Caribbean Peasantry; Transatlantic Slave Trade; Iberian Atlantic world; Caribbean colonization

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wheat, D. (2009). The Afro-Portuguese Maritime World and the Foundations of Spanish Caribbean Society, 1570-1640. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-05272009-181157/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wheat, David. “The Afro-Portuguese Maritime World and the Foundations of Spanish Caribbean Society, 1570-1640.” 2009. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-05272009-181157/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wheat, David. “The Afro-Portuguese Maritime World and the Foundations of Spanish Caribbean Society, 1570-1640.” 2009. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Wheat D. The Afro-Portuguese Maritime World and the Foundations of Spanish Caribbean Society, 1570-1640. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2009. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-05272009-181157/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Wheat D. The Afro-Portuguese Maritime World and the Foundations of Spanish Caribbean Society, 1570-1640. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2009. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-05272009-181157/ ;

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