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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("David G. Schlundt, Ph.D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Arrindell, Adrienne Hadley. Latent Classes of Women Undergoing Inpatient Eating Disorder Treatment.

Degree: MA, Psychology, 2012, Vanderbilt University

This study accounted for patterns of eating disorder (ED) psychopathology, bingeing, and vomiting using latent ED classes. A latent profile analysis was conducted using Eating Disorder Inventory scores of 2,247 females undergoing inpatient ED treatment at a specialized facility as indicators of latent profile (or class) membership. The model then incorporated DSM-IV ED diagnoses, ED correlates and psychiatric comorbidities, including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and substance abuse, as predictors of latent class membership. Information criteria and likelihood ratio tests indicated a four-class solution: (1) restricting anorexia nervosa, characterized by low BMI and OCD; (2) atypical anorexia characterized by non-eating disorder levels of drive for thinness and low comorbidity; (3) bulimia characterized by OCD; and (4) bulimia characterized by high ED and comorbid psychopathology and longer illness duration. Substance abuse did not predict class membership. Findings support a broad distinction between restricting and bulimic syndromes and emphasize the relatively large prevalence of an atypical anorexia class. Advisors/Committee Members: Sonya Sterba, Ph.D. (committee member), David G. Schlundt, Ph.D. (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: anorexia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Arrindell, A. H. (2012). Latent Classes of Women Undergoing Inpatient Eating Disorder Treatment. (Masters Thesis). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-03242012-151106/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arrindell, Adrienne Hadley. “Latent Classes of Women Undergoing Inpatient Eating Disorder Treatment.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Vanderbilt University. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-03242012-151106/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arrindell, Adrienne Hadley. “Latent Classes of Women Undergoing Inpatient Eating Disorder Treatment.” 2012. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Arrindell AH. Latent Classes of Women Undergoing Inpatient Eating Disorder Treatment. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2012. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-03242012-151106/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Arrindell AH. Latent Classes of Women Undergoing Inpatient Eating Disorder Treatment. [Masters Thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2012. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-03242012-151106/ ;


Vanderbilt University

2. Cox, Brittany Leigh. Applying the Social Ecological Framework and Social Cognitive Theory to food desert interventions: What is effective, ineffective, and where to go from here.

Degree: MA, Medicine, Health, and Society, 2019, Vanderbilt University

Living in a food desert is associated with worse health outcomes, and consequently there has been an increasing amount of intervention research on how improve access to and consumption of healthy foods among people who live in these areas. This thesis aimed to identify interventions in food deserts and among other low-income populations that implemented a healthy eating intervention and measured either sales or consumption of healthy foods before and after the intervention. Searches of a list of pre-specified phrases were conducted on Google Scholar to identify food desert interventions. Forty-five articles were identified through these searches that met inclusion criteria. Of these, 7 targeted individuals, 22 targeted the community, 9 targeted public policy, and 7 were multilevel. 32 interventions succeeded at increasing participantsâ consumption of healthy foods, and 7 of the 13 that did not were interventions that tested the effects on diet of a new grocery store in a food desert. Opening new grocery stores in food deserts has long been championed as the next step in addressing the nutritional inequality that exists between residents of food deserts and residents of wealthier areas. However, there was little evidence found to suggest that this is an effective solution to the problem. Policies that incentivize the purchase of healthy foods and multilevel interventions that pair community-level changes in food access with individually-based education interventions were found to be the most effective interventions. Advisors/Committee Members: David G. Schlundt, Ph.D. (chair), JuLeigh Petty, Ph.D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Corner store intervention; Farmers market; Food injustice; Food insecurity; Health behavior change; Food swamp; Health disparities; Health outcomes; Multilevel intervention; Mobile market; Natural experiment; Outcome expectations; Public health; Self-efficacy; Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cox, B. L. (2019). Applying the Social Ecological Framework and Social Cognitive Theory to food desert interventions: What is effective, ineffective, and where to go from here. (Masters Thesis). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-07152019-140452/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cox, Brittany Leigh. “Applying the Social Ecological Framework and Social Cognitive Theory to food desert interventions: What is effective, ineffective, and where to go from here.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Vanderbilt University. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-07152019-140452/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cox, Brittany Leigh. “Applying the Social Ecological Framework and Social Cognitive Theory to food desert interventions: What is effective, ineffective, and where to go from here.” 2019. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Cox BL. Applying the Social Ecological Framework and Social Cognitive Theory to food desert interventions: What is effective, ineffective, and where to go from here. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-07152019-140452/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Cox BL. Applying the Social Ecological Framework and Social Cognitive Theory to food desert interventions: What is effective, ineffective, and where to go from here. [Masters Thesis]. Vanderbilt University; 2019. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-07152019-140452/ ;

3. Arrindell, Adrienne Hadley. Binge Eating Disorder: Recognition and Guided Self-Help Treatment in an Underserved Population.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2016, Vanderbilt University

Data presented in this paper address questions about binge eating disorder (BED) recognition as a barrier to care, attitudes toward binge eating treatment options, and feasibility of guided self-help (GSH) cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for binge eating in black American, lower socioeconomic status (SES) women. This paper presents results from two studies. In Study 1, equal numbers of black and white American women completed a computerized experiment in which they were presented with photographic and narrative vignettes of women with BED who were either black or white American and of lower or higher SES. Study 2 participants completed this recognition task, after which half were randomized to GSH CBT based on Overcoming Binge Eating (Fairburn, 2013) and encouraged to use the Recovery Record mobile application ("Recovery Record," 2014) for self-monitoring. Additionally, Study 2 participants rated the acceptability of evidence-based binge eating treatments and modes of delivery. Findings emphasize that overall BED recognition is low, with some evidence that white, lower SES women are more likely to recognize BED and that community recognition is lower when symptoms present in black, lower SES women. Pilot study results also indicate that recruiting participants appears to be the biggest barrier to GSH CBT in black, lower SES women, although the average initiation rate, low attrition rate, and general acceptability rankings of GSH CBT found here support the potential utility of this treatment. Advisors/Committee Members: David G. Schlundt, Ph.D. (chair), Derek M. Griffith, Ph.D. (committee member), Steven D. Hollon, Ph.D. (committee member), Hector F. Myers Ph.D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: recognition; binge eating disorder; ethnicity/race; socioeconomic status; cognitive behavioral therapy; guided self-help treatment

…approved by the Vanderbilt University Institutional Review Board (IRB). All surveys… …researchers at Vanderbilt University. Eligible participants will receive compensation for their… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Arrindell, A. H. (2016). Binge Eating Disorder: Recognition and Guided Self-Help Treatment in an Underserved Population. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-11142016-110159/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arrindell, Adrienne Hadley. “Binge Eating Disorder: Recognition and Guided Self-Help Treatment in an Underserved Population.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed July 10, 2020. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-11142016-110159/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arrindell, Adrienne Hadley. “Binge Eating Disorder: Recognition and Guided Self-Help Treatment in an Underserved Population.” 2016. Web. 10 Jul 2020.

Vancouver:

Arrindell AH. Binge Eating Disorder: Recognition and Guided Self-Help Treatment in an Underserved Population. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jul 10]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-11142016-110159/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Arrindell AH. Binge Eating Disorder: Recognition and Guided Self-Help Treatment in an Underserved Population. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-11142016-110159/ ;

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