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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Christopher V. Wright"). Showing records 1 – 6 of 6 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Stancill, Jennifer Susan. Dissecting Pancreatic β-cell Stress Using Whole Transcriptome Sequencing.

Degree: PhD, Cell and Developmental Biology, 2017, Vanderbilt University

 Type 2 diabetes is characterized by failure of pancreatic β-cells to secrete adequate insulin to meet the needs of the body. This β-cell failure is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: cell signaling; pancreas; calcium signaling; RNA-sequencing; beta cell; Diabetes

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APA (6th Edition):

Stancill, J. S. (2017). Dissecting Pancreatic β-cell Stress Using Whole Transcriptome Sequencing. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10825

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stancill, Jennifer Susan. “Dissecting Pancreatic β-cell Stress Using Whole Transcriptome Sequencing.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10825.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stancill, Jennifer Susan. “Dissecting Pancreatic β-cell Stress Using Whole Transcriptome Sequencing.” 2017. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Stancill JS. Dissecting Pancreatic β-cell Stress Using Whole Transcriptome Sequencing. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10825.

Council of Science Editors:

Stancill JS. Dissecting Pancreatic β-cell Stress Using Whole Transcriptome Sequencing. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10825


Vanderbilt University

2. Tidball, Andrew Martin. A Manganese-Handling Deficit in Huntington’s Disease Selectively Impairs ATM-p53 Signaling.

Degree: PhD, Neuroscience, 2014, Vanderbilt University

 The essential micronutrient manganese is enriched in brain, especially the basal ganglia. We sought to identify neuronal signaling pathways responsive to neurologically relevant manganese levels,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: manganese; induced-pluripotent stem cells; ATM; p53; cell signaling; cytotoxicity; genomic instability; Huntingtons disease

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APA (6th Edition):

Tidball, A. M. (2014). A Manganese-Handling Deficit in Huntington’s Disease Selectively Impairs ATM-p53 Signaling. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14230

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tidball, Andrew Martin. “A Manganese-Handling Deficit in Huntington’s Disease Selectively Impairs ATM-p53 Signaling.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14230.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tidball, Andrew Martin. “A Manganese-Handling Deficit in Huntington’s Disease Selectively Impairs ATM-p53 Signaling.” 2014. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Tidball AM. A Manganese-Handling Deficit in Huntington’s Disease Selectively Impairs ATM-p53 Signaling. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14230.

Council of Science Editors:

Tidball AM. A Manganese-Handling Deficit in Huntington’s Disease Selectively Impairs ATM-p53 Signaling. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14230


Vanderbilt University

3. Weis, Victoria Gail. Characterization of the metaplastic process in the stomach using in vivo models and novel normal and metaplastic gastric cell lines.

Degree: PhD, Cell and Developmental Biology, 2013, Vanderbilt University

 Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection in humans causes prominent inflammation and oxyntic atrophy, which leads to two distinct types of metaplasia: intestinal metaplasia and spasmolytic polypeptide… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: SPEM; Gastric Cancer; Chief Cell; Transdifferentiation; Mist1; Immortomouse

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APA (6th Edition):

Weis, V. G. (2013). Characterization of the metaplastic process in the stomach using in vivo models and novel normal and metaplastic gastric cell lines. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13193

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Weis, Victoria Gail. “Characterization of the metaplastic process in the stomach using in vivo models and novel normal and metaplastic gastric cell lines.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13193.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Weis, Victoria Gail. “Characterization of the metaplastic process in the stomach using in vivo models and novel normal and metaplastic gastric cell lines.” 2013. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Weis VG. Characterization of the metaplastic process in the stomach using in vivo models and novel normal and metaplastic gastric cell lines. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13193.

Council of Science Editors:

Weis VG. Characterization of the metaplastic process in the stomach using in vivo models and novel normal and metaplastic gastric cell lines. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13193


Vanderbilt University

4. Sedgeman, Leslie Roteta. The pathophysiology and functionality of metabolic microRNAs in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

Degree: PhD, Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, 2018, Vanderbilt University

 microRNAs (miRNA) have been shown to be critical players in metabolism. While most miRNAs studies have focused on their functional role within cells, miRNAs are… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: microRNAs; high-density lipoproteins; diabetes; islet; extracellular RNA

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APA (6th Edition):

Sedgeman, L. R. (2018). The pathophysiology and functionality of metabolic microRNAs in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14403

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sedgeman, Leslie Roteta. “The pathophysiology and functionality of metabolic microRNAs in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14403.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sedgeman, Leslie Roteta. “The pathophysiology and functionality of metabolic microRNAs in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.” 2018. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Sedgeman LR. The pathophysiology and functionality of metabolic microRNAs in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14403.

Council of Science Editors:

Sedgeman LR. The pathophysiology and functionality of metabolic microRNAs in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/14403


Vanderbilt University

5. Miller-Fleming, Tyne Whitney. Molecular Dissection of Synaptic Remodeling in GABAergic Neurons.

Degree: PhD, Neuroscience, 2017, Vanderbilt University

 Synaptic circuits are dynamically refined during development as synapses are either stabilized or eliminated. This process requires both neuronal activity and genetic programming; however, the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: synaptic remodeling; C. elegans; plasticity; activity-dependent; synapse removal; ion channel

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APA (6th Edition):

Miller-Fleming, T. W. (2017). Molecular Dissection of Synaptic Remodeling in GABAergic Neurons. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10488

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Miller-Fleming, Tyne Whitney. “Molecular Dissection of Synaptic Remodeling in GABAergic Neurons.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10488.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Miller-Fleming, Tyne Whitney. “Molecular Dissection of Synaptic Remodeling in GABAergic Neurons.” 2017. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Miller-Fleming TW. Molecular Dissection of Synaptic Remodeling in GABAergic Neurons. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10488.

Council of Science Editors:

Miller-Fleming TW. Molecular Dissection of Synaptic Remodeling in GABAergic Neurons. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/10488


Vanderbilt University

6. Lowery, Jonathan Wayne. Bmp signaling in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and disease.

Degree: PhD, Cell and Developmental Biology, 2010, Vanderbilt University

 Bone morphogenetic protein (Bmp) signaling is critical for vascular development and homeostasis. Defects in this pathway lead to multiple vascular diseases, including Heritable Pulmonary Arterial… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Bmp; pulmonary; pulmonary hypertension; hypoxia; Bmpr2; eNOS; Id1

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lowery, J. W. (2010). Bmp signaling in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and disease. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12211

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lowery, Jonathan Wayne. “Bmp signaling in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and disease.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12211.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lowery, Jonathan Wayne. “Bmp signaling in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and disease.” 2010. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lowery JW. Bmp signaling in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and disease. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12211.

Council of Science Editors:

Lowery JW. Bmp signaling in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and disease. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/12211

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