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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Christopher C. Quarles"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Watkins, Tristan Jamison. Neural Correlates of Obesity: Disgust, Inflammation, and Brain Function.

Degree: PhD, Neuroscience, 2016, Vanderbilt University

Body weight is tightly controlled by the homeostatic feeding system, which is primarily reliant upon communication between the endocrine system and the brain. The endocrine system and brain are highly complex systems with multiple components that can present with altered function. Decreased neural insulin or leptin sensitivity and altered neural underpinnings of disgust are associated with obesity. As such, it is important to explore new factors that are associated with obesity and to continually expand upon existing methodologies to increase our understanding of this multi-faceted disorder. Our results across two studies reveal the structural and functional underpinnings of Disgust Proneness, as well as how Disgust Proneness is altered in obesity. Obese individuals have lower levels of Disgust Sensitivity, as measured by the Disgust Propensity and Sensitivity Scale รข Revised (DPSS-R). Using an fMRI-optimized task designed to elicit disgust and food-related disgust, we found that obese individuals have less insula BOLD activation than the lean group. This is the first identification of altered levels of BOLD activation in obese individuals within the insula. Furthermore, the self-reported measures of Disgust Sensitivity were positively correlated with insula activation extracted from the lean group, but negatively correlated with insula activation extracted from the obese group. This finding suggests that there is a functional dissociation between self-report of Disgust Sensitivity and neural activation in obese individuals. Our study did not reveal between-group differences in insula grey matter volume. Diet- and obesity-induced parenchymal density changes have been documented in the rodent mediobasal hypothalamus using immunohistochemistry. Emerging MRI techniques are being developed to quantify these changes in parenchymal density in living humans. Our study sought to explore the viability of using single echo T1 MRI scans to identify parenchymal density changes in human subjects before and after weight loss and insulin detemir intervention. Our null results suggest that single echo T1-weighted MRI is not a suitable alternative to single or multi echo T2-weighted MRI. Advisors/Committee Members: Bunmi O. Olatunji (committee member), Christopher C. Quarles (committee member), Kevin D. Niswender (chair), Ronald L. Cowan (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: neuroinflammation; disgust; obesity; brain function; MRI

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Watkins, T. J. (2016). Neural Correlates of Obesity: Disgust, Inflammation, and Brain Function. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06022016-170859/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Watkins, Tristan Jamison. “Neural Correlates of Obesity: Disgust, Inflammation, and Brain Function.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06022016-170859/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Watkins, Tristan Jamison. “Neural Correlates of Obesity: Disgust, Inflammation, and Brain Function.” 2016. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Watkins TJ. Neural Correlates of Obesity: Disgust, Inflammation, and Brain Function. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06022016-170859/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Watkins TJ. Neural Correlates of Obesity: Disgust, Inflammation, and Brain Function. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2016. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-06022016-170859/ ;


Vanderbilt University

2. Loveless, Mary E. Optimization, Application, and Cross-correlation of DCE-MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2010, Vanderbilt University

With cancer encompassing a range of disease states and phenotypes, assessing treatment efficacy early, accurately, and non-invasively is essential to optimize therapy planning on an individualized basis. This work discusses two types of cancer imaging techniques, dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI), and the importance they have to several classes of drug treatment regimens. Additionally, this work optimizes and identifies errors in current protocols used in preclinical MRI studies of anti-cancer therapies. These optimized protocols were then used to assess the efficacy of a novel anti-cancer treatment early in the course of therapy. Finally, the relationship between two MR imaging biomarkers frequently used in monitoring cancer therapy were assessed and compared to histology. Advisors/Committee Members: Christopher C. Quarles (committee member), Thomas E. Yankeelov (chair), John C. Gore (committee member), J. Oliver McIntyre (committee member), Mark Does (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: cancer; MRI; DCE-MRI

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Loveless, M. E. (2010). Optimization, Application, and Cross-correlation of DCE-MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-11172010-081943/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Loveless, Mary E. “Optimization, Application, and Cross-correlation of DCE-MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed January 24, 2020. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-11172010-081943/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Loveless, Mary E. “Optimization, Application, and Cross-correlation of DCE-MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer.” 2010. Web. 24 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Loveless ME. Optimization, Application, and Cross-correlation of DCE-MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 24]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-11172010-081943/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Loveless ME. Optimization, Application, and Cross-correlation of DCE-MRI in Small Animal Models of Cancer. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-11172010-081943/ ;

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