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You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Benjamin WY Hornsby"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Vanderbilt University

1. Spankovich, Christopher. Early Indices of Auditory Pathology in Young Adults with Type-1 Diabetes.

Degree: PhD, Hearing and Speech Sciences, 2010, Vanderbilt University

This project is concerned with the relationship between type-1 diabetes and auditory pathology. In this dissertation I compared hearing sensitivity, cochlear function, and peripheral auditory neural function (afferent and efferent) in young adults with type-1 diabetes in comparison to matched controls. As a secondary objective I explored the influence of covariates, such as diabetes control, sex, and noise exposure. My findings suggest that the persons with type-1 diabetes demonstrated early signs of cochlear pathology and that this damage was related to sex and history of noise exposure. In addition, I demonstrated the utility of low-level stimulus evoked otoacoustic emissions in showing reduced cochlear function in participants with higher noise exposure and type-1 diabetes despite otherwise normal auditory function outcomes. Identification and recognition of early indices of cochlear pathology may allow intervention and prevention of noise related hearing loss in persons with and without type-1 diabetes. Advisors/Committee Members: Daniel H Ashmead (committee member), Benjamin WY Hornsby (committee member), Bill Russell (committee member), Linda J Hood (chair).

Subjects/Keywords: diabetes; auditory; hearing; otoacoustic emission; auditory brainstem response; oae suppression; fine structure

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Spankovich, C. (2010). Early Indices of Auditory Pathology in Young Adults with Type-1 Diabetes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-09142010-120712/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Spankovich, Christopher. “Early Indices of Auditory Pathology in Young Adults with Type-1 Diabetes.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-09142010-120712/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Spankovich, Christopher. “Early Indices of Auditory Pathology in Young Adults with Type-1 Diabetes.” 2010. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Spankovich C. Early Indices of Auditory Pathology in Young Adults with Type-1 Diabetes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-09142010-120712/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Spankovich C. Early Indices of Auditory Pathology in Young Adults with Type-1 Diabetes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2010. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu/available/etd-09142010-120712/ ;


Vanderbilt University

2. Gustafson, Samantha Jordan. Cortical Associates of Speech-in-Noise Perception from Childhood to Adulthood.

Degree: PhD, Hearing and Speech Sciences, 2017, Vanderbilt University

It is well documented that noise has a detrimental effect on speech processing and that speech-in-noise perception abilities continue to develop into adolescence. However, our understanding of the mechanism by which background noise adversely affects speech perception throughout childhood remains incomplete. This study used sensory (N1) and cognitive (P3) cortical auditory-evoked potentials (CAEPs) to investigate how background noise affects different stages of speech processing for listeners of various ages and to describe how sensory and cognitive processes contribute to age-related performance variation on a clinical speech-in-noise perception task. Fifty-eight normal-hearing listeners (age 7-25 years) completed a speech syllable discrimination task in quiet and in background noise (4-talker babble, +15 dB signal-to-noise ratio; SNR) using active (i.e., response required) and passive (i.e., no response required) testing conditions. Results showed that the presence of noise affected the sensory representation of speech to a greater extent than the cognitive processes involved in speech sound discrimination. Listeners of all ages showed changes in N1 amplitude and delays in N1 latency when background noise was present. The magnitude of change to the N1 amplitude was dependent upon age but delays in sensory processing were consistent across all listeners. Delays in P3 latencies were found for all listeners with the presence of noise, with no changes measured for P3 amplitude and no effects of age. Noise-induced delays in cognitive processing were not related with behavioral speech-in-noise perception. Conversely, the age-related improvements in speech-in-noise perception that continue throughout childhood and into adolescence were supported by more robust sensory processing of speech in noise. That is, children and adolescents who showed less N1 amplitude reduction also showed better speech-in-noise perception. This work provides a foundation upon which to build when using CAEPs to examine speech-in-noise perception in children with normal hearing or hearing loss and suggests that theories of the development of speech-in-noise perception should consider the role that sensory encoding plays in the successful perception of speech in noise. Advisors/Committee Members: Benjamin WY Hornsby (committee member), Alexandra Key (chair), Curtis Billings (committee member), Anne Marie Tharpe (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: event-related potentials; ERP; cortical auditory evoked potential; children; development; speech-in-noise perception; oddball paradigm; speech discrimination

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gustafson, S. J. (2017). Cortical Associates of Speech-in-Noise Perception from Childhood to Adulthood. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-11142017-112705/ ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gustafson, Samantha Jordan. “Cortical Associates of Speech-in-Noise Perception from Childhood to Adulthood.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed December 14, 2019. http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-11142017-112705/ ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gustafson, Samantha Jordan. “Cortical Associates of Speech-in-Noise Perception from Childhood to Adulthood.” 2017. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Gustafson SJ. Cortical Associates of Speech-in-Noise Perception from Childhood to Adulthood. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-11142017-112705/ ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Gustafson SJ. Cortical Associates of Speech-in-Noise Perception from Childhood to Adulthood. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. Available from: http://etd.library.vanderbilt.edu//available/etd-11142017-112705/ ;

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