Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

You searched for +publisher:"Vanderbilt University" +contributor:("Amy Non"). One record found.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Vanderbilt University

1. Hollister, Brittany Marie. Examining the Role of Socioeconomic Status on Blood Pressure in African Americans.

Degree: PhD, Human Genetics, 2017, Vanderbilt University

Understanding the genetic and environmental factors contributing to blood pressure is an important step in elucidating the causes of hypertension, a disease of high blood pressure. African Americans experience the highest burden of hypertension in the United States, however little is known about the genetic factors contributing to blood pressure in African Americans, despite a high estimated heritability. Furthermore, current large scale studies of genetic variants contributing to blood pressure in African Americans do not include socioeconomic status (SES) information, in spite of a strong association between SES and blood pressure. To examine the potential interactions between SES and genetic variants contributing to blood pressure, a hospital-based population with electronic health records was used. Prior to conducting genetic analysis, several algorithms were developed to extract SES information from electronic health records (EHR). These algorithms extracted occupation, retirement, education level, unemployment, homelessness, Medicaid, and uninsured status with high accuracy. With the extracted education information, interactions between genetic variants contributing to blood pressure in African Americans and education were examined. No statistically significant interactions were observed. Some novel statistically significant and suggestive associations between genetic variants and blood pressure were observed. One suggestive interaction between a genetic variant and education level affecting blood pressure was detected. These results indicate that exploring interactions between SES data extracted from EHRs and genetic variants is possible on a large scale. Advisors/Committee Members: Todd Edwards (committee member), Derek Griffith (committee member), Dana Crawford (committee member), Amy Non (committee member), Melinda Aldrich (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: African Americans; genetic; socioeconomic status; blood pressure

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hollister, B. M. (2017). Examining the Role of Socioeconomic Status on Blood Pressure in African Americans. (Doctoral Dissertation). Vanderbilt University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13798

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hollister, Brittany Marie. “Examining the Role of Socioeconomic Status on Blood Pressure in African Americans.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Vanderbilt University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13798.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hollister, Brittany Marie. “Examining the Role of Socioeconomic Status on Blood Pressure in African Americans.” 2017. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hollister BM. Examining the Role of Socioeconomic Status on Blood Pressure in African Americans. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13798.

Council of Science Editors:

Hollister BM. Examining the Role of Socioeconomic Status on Blood Pressure in African Americans. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Vanderbilt University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1803/13798

.