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You searched for +publisher:"Utah State University" +contributor:("Paul Wolf"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Utah State University

1. Koontz, Austin C. Applied Species Delimitation in Microbial Taxa and Plants.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2020, Utah State University

Species are a fundamental concept in biology, and many subdisciplines in biology utilize species in aspects of theory and in the communication of results. Given the centrality of species in biological science, it can seem surprising that there is no universal definition amongst biologists of what, strictly speaking, a species is. In fact, there are, by some estimates, over 20 different "species concepts", and this lack of a consensus is termed "the species problem". This problem has theoretical underpinnings, but has become more relevant as advances in sequencing technologies over the past two decades have allowed researchers to probe the genetics of populations, and in doing so, uncover instances of genetically distinct populations within a species. This thesis explores issues in species delimitation in two broadly different scenarios. The first, in Chapter 2, involves grouping individuals in microbial communities, and using phylogenetics to inform the effects of different species boundary thresholds. The second, in Chapter 3, explores the genetic differences between varieties of a species complex of plant endemic to the Great Basin region of the western United States, including a variety endemic to Logan Canyon (Primula cusickiana variety maguirei, or Maguire's primrose). While the contexts of these chapters are largely different, they nevertheless share a distinguishing trait, common throughout much of biology: ambiguous species boundaries. Advisors/Committee Members: William D. Pearse, Paul Wolf, Bonnie Waring, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: species delimitation; microbes; microbial ecology; plants; population genetics; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Koontz, A. C. (2020). Applied Species Delimitation in Microbial Taxa and Plants. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7960

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koontz, Austin C. “Applied Species Delimitation in Microbial Taxa and Plants.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed April 20, 2021. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7960.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koontz, Austin C. “Applied Species Delimitation in Microbial Taxa and Plants.” 2020. Web. 20 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Koontz AC. Applied Species Delimitation in Microbial Taxa and Plants. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 20]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7960.

Council of Science Editors:

Koontz AC. Applied Species Delimitation in Microbial Taxa and Plants. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 2020. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7960


Utah State University

2. Robison, Tanner A. Exploring the Physiology and Evolution of Hornworts.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2019, Utah State University

Plants contain organelles called chloroplasts, which is where photosynthesis takes place. Chloroplasts also contain their own DNA, which is separate from the DNA in the nucleus. This DNA does not change much over evolutionary time, so it can be used to investigate relationships between organisms. Here we created a tool that makes it easier to analyze this chloroplast DNA as well making it easier to share complete chloroplast genomes on public databases. In addition, we also found a mobile element in the chloroplast DNA of a group of ferns, which appears to be driving structural changes in their genomes. Advisors/Committee Members: Paul Wolf, Keith Mott, Bruce Bugbee, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: plastome; mobile element; hornwort; fern; annotation; Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Robison, T. A. (2019). Exploring the Physiology and Evolution of Hornworts. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7668

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Robison, Tanner A. “Exploring the Physiology and Evolution of Hornworts.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed April 20, 2021. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7668.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Robison, Tanner A. “Exploring the Physiology and Evolution of Hornworts.” 2019. Web. 20 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Robison TA. Exploring the Physiology and Evolution of Hornworts. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 2019. [cited 2021 Apr 20]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7668.

Council of Science Editors:

Robison TA. Exploring the Physiology and Evolution of Hornworts. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 2019. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7668


Utah State University

3. Madsen, Marley. Patterns of Microbial Diversity and Community Composition in Slot Canyons, Rock Pools, and Other Ephemeral and Perennial Aquatic Habitats.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2020, Utah State University

Microbes are the most diverse life forms on the planet and perform many important ecological functions. However, despite the abundance, diversity, and ecological importance of microbes they are often overlooked and understudied in many natural systems, including freshwater habitats. This thesis details the first ever investigation of the microbial diversity and community composition within fresh water rock pools and slot canyons of the Colorado Plateau, Utah. The purpose of the study was to determine the relative importance of various microbial community assembly processes. This thesis also includes a meta-analysis of the microbial alpha diversity in other perennial and ephemeral aquatic systems around the globe. The purpose of the meta-analysis was to identify the relationship between microbial alpha diversity and disturbance from drying. Together, these studies complement one another by describing the microbial ecology of a very specific habitat type, rock pools, as well as a diverse group of globally distributed aquatic habitats. Advisors/Committee Members: Bonnie Waring, Paul Wolf, Will Pearse, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: microbial ecology; species sorting; dispersal limitation; alpha diversity; meta-analysis; community composition; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Madsen, M. (2020). Patterns of Microbial Diversity and Community Composition in Slot Canyons, Rock Pools, and Other Ephemeral and Perennial Aquatic Habitats. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7750

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Madsen, Marley. “Patterns of Microbial Diversity and Community Composition in Slot Canyons, Rock Pools, and Other Ephemeral and Perennial Aquatic Habitats.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed April 20, 2021. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7750.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Madsen, Marley. “Patterns of Microbial Diversity and Community Composition in Slot Canyons, Rock Pools, and Other Ephemeral and Perennial Aquatic Habitats.” 2020. Web. 20 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Madsen M. Patterns of Microbial Diversity and Community Composition in Slot Canyons, Rock Pools, and Other Ephemeral and Perennial Aquatic Habitats. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 20]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7750.

Council of Science Editors:

Madsen M. Patterns of Microbial Diversity and Community Composition in Slot Canyons, Rock Pools, and Other Ephemeral and Perennial Aquatic Habitats. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 2020. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7750

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