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You searched for +publisher:"Utah State University" +contributor:("Lawrence Culver"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Utah State University

1. Lockette, Philip M. Sex in the Kitchen: The Re-interpretation of Gendered Space Within the Post-World War II Suburban Home in the West.

Degree: MA, History, 2010, Utah State University

In the decades following 1945, Americans moved increasingly out of cities into suburbs. The migration illustrated the emergence of a new, broader middle class as a result of growing postwar affluence. In the previous half-century, families living in a suburb could claim middle-class status. The emerging class built its identity on the forms and values adopted from this earlier, more affluent Victorian middle class. These adopted values were played out in a home designed around Progressive era ideals of the family. Through this Progressive filter, the new concept of the home was scaled down, without servants, and ceased existing wholly as the wife's sphere of influence – as in the Victorian version. The Progressive impulse also reduced the size of the house to make it more efficient, and through government subsidies shaped the home into a smaller, economically sized package. The financial framework that determined the shape of the postwar home also influenced the technology placed within its walls. This financially influenced technology particularly affected the shape and content of the kitchen. The new, efficient kitchen did not release women from their duty to provide daily family meals, but it did create a culturally safe space for men to cook as a hobby. In the postwar, suburban kitchen women and men contended with economic pressures and changing social realities which complicated the Victorian values and Progressive ideals. Middle-class women needed to leave the home for work, and – now separated from traditional urban social outlets – middle-class men sought refuge in the suburban home. By examining Sunset magazine's "Chefs of the West" column, traditional women's cookbooks and service magazines, men's magazines, building industry trade journals, and census reports, the kitchen demonstrates that women and men reshaped the home in response to changing middle-class values. While financing regulations at first shaped how the emerging middle class lived within the postwar, suburban home, residents reinterpreted the space as a reaction to the economic changes around them. This cycle continued with each new interpretation of the postwar single-family home. Advisors/Committee Members: Lawrence Culver, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: American West; Domestic Space; Feminization; Kitchen; Masculization; Suburbs; American Art and Architecture; Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies; History; United States History

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APA (6th Edition):

Lockette, P. M. (2010). Sex in the Kitchen: The Re-interpretation of Gendered Space Within the Post-World War II Suburban Home in the West. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/668

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lockette, Philip M. “Sex in the Kitchen: The Re-interpretation of Gendered Space Within the Post-World War II Suburban Home in the West.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/668.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lockette, Philip M. “Sex in the Kitchen: The Re-interpretation of Gendered Space Within the Post-World War II Suburban Home in the West.” 2010. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Lockette PM. Sex in the Kitchen: The Re-interpretation of Gendered Space Within the Post-World War II Suburban Home in the West. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 2010. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/668.

Council of Science Editors:

Lockette PM. Sex in the Kitchen: The Re-interpretation of Gendered Space Within the Post-World War II Suburban Home in the West. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 2010. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/668


Utah State University

2. Larsen, Zachary R. In Defense of the Modern Company Town: Wyoming's Uranium Communities.

Degree: MA, History, 2019, Utah State University

Most people are at least aware that, in the past, companies that owned mines, lumber mills, and other large-scale industrial projects in isolated areas also ran company towns. For many people, such towns conjure up images miserable working conditions, exploitative company stores, and inadequate shacks for most workers, while managers live in relative luxury up on “snob knob.” Most people are also fairly certain that such towns, at least in the United States, died out about the same time as the horse and buggy. Several industries in Wyoming, however, continued to support company towns through the end of the 20th century, with one such town surviving into the early 2000s. This project looks at two of these towns supported by the uranium mining and milling industry that dominated central Wyoming’s economy for about 30 years starting in the mid-1950s. These towns, Gas Hills and Jeffrey City, along with Wyoming’s other modern company towns represent a new era in the history of these communities. Furthermore, they actually had many advantages for inhabitants, companies, and the local economy, especially compared to a small conventional community located near a resource boom. Often, and in contrast to the towns in this thesis, conventional towns must scramble to meet the demands of a massive migration, only to be left with unpaid bonds when the resource dries up or becomes no longer profitable. Advisors/Committee Members: Lawrence Culver, Lisa Gabbert, Rebecca Andersen, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: uranium; mining; company town; wyoming; fremont county; jeffrey city; gas hills; energy; History

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Larsen, Z. R. (2019). In Defense of the Modern Company Town: Wyoming's Uranium Communities. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7633

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Larsen, Zachary R. “In Defense of the Modern Company Town: Wyoming's Uranium Communities.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7633.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Larsen, Zachary R. “In Defense of the Modern Company Town: Wyoming's Uranium Communities.” 2019. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Larsen ZR. In Defense of the Modern Company Town: Wyoming's Uranium Communities. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7633.

Council of Science Editors:

Larsen ZR. In Defense of the Modern Company Town: Wyoming's Uranium Communities. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 2019. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/7633


Utah State University

3. Van Huss, Jami J. From Cultural Traditions to National Trends: The Transition of Domestic Mormon Architecture in Cache Valley, Utah, 1860 – 1915.

Degree: MA, History, 2009, Utah State University

As any architectural historian would argue, historic buildings are the most accessible, yet illusive documents of their founding culture, and as the relevant historiography argues, the early Mormon pioneer built environment in Utah is no exception. In fact, many Mormon architectural historians posit that due to the exclusivity and unusual circumstances of many Mormon settlements, their original structures have an exceptional ability to comment on the culture that erected them. The first permanent settlement in Cache Valley, Wellsville, provides a particularly lucrative opportunity to discover a great deal about the founding pioneers who established it due to the city's time and place within the context of Mormon colonization, the plethora of original domiciles that remain standing, and the wealth of genealogical documents that still exist in the community shedding light on the lives and skills of the community's original craftsmen. While the voices of vernacular builders are often lost, leaving only their structures to testify of the culture, the incorporation of personal histories and interviews with descendents and acquaintances of three specific builders grants this argument a distinct foundation. This thesis explores the change in housing designs in Wellsville from vernacular styles to nationally popular housing patterns at the turn of the twentieth century by examining three specific structures. By contrasting a stone saltbox and clap-boarded Georgian house, both built in the 1860s, with a bungalow built in 1914, and investigating the lives of their respective builders, I demonstrate how housing design practices mirror the social and political transition of the Mormon church during this period. At the same time that late-nineteenth century Mormons sought to change their image by emerging from isolation, gaining statehood, and assimilating into a more national identity, a modern housing movement proliferated throughout the western United States. By participating in this transition of domestic structures, the Mormons discarded the vernacular housing traditions brought by Mormonism's founding community of diverse converts from Europe and New England in favor of popular designs readily available in widely published plan books. Had the national transition in housing happened even a decade earlier, it is plausible that the still-insular and strictly traditional Mormon culture region would have resisted such a change. Thus the alteration in housing serves as evidence of the transition in Mormonism toward the national mainstream at the turn of the twentieth century. While a vast historiography concerning Mormon sacred structures exists, this thesis strengthens the discourse regarding the religion's understudied domestic built environment. Furthermore, by illustrating the important role that historic houses in Cache Valley play in both discovering and remembering the foundation of this valley, I hope to foster the desire to both appreciate and preserve these structures as crucial pieces of cultural… Advisors/Committee Members: Lawrence Culver, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: Domestic; Mormon; Vernacular; History of Art, Architecture, and Archaeology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Van Huss, J. J. (2009). From Cultural Traditions to National Trends: The Transition of Domestic Mormon Architecture in Cache Valley, Utah, 1860 – 1915. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/371

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Huss, Jami J. “From Cultural Traditions to National Trends: The Transition of Domestic Mormon Architecture in Cache Valley, Utah, 1860 – 1915.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed January 18, 2020. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/371.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Huss, Jami J. “From Cultural Traditions to National Trends: The Transition of Domestic Mormon Architecture in Cache Valley, Utah, 1860 – 1915.” 2009. Web. 18 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Van Huss JJ. From Cultural Traditions to National Trends: The Transition of Domestic Mormon Architecture in Cache Valley, Utah, 1860 – 1915. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 18]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/371.

Council of Science Editors:

Van Huss JJ. From Cultural Traditions to National Trends: The Transition of Domestic Mormon Architecture in Cache Valley, Utah, 1860 – 1915. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 2009. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/371

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