Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Utah State University" +contributor:("Joseph T. Blake"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Utah State University

1. Field, Patricia H. Tissue Mineral Imbalances in Cattle with Brisket Disease.

Degree: PhD, Animal, Dairy, and Veterinary Sciences, 1972, Utah State University

Twenty four cattle, six each of healthy cows and calves, and cows and calves with brisket disease, were obtained, examined and slaughtered, The concentrations of calcium, chloride, cobalt, copper, iron, magnesium, molybdenum, phosphorus, potassium, sodium and zinc; and percent absolute dry matter and percent ash were determined in tissues selected from the following: cardiac, hepatic, renal, osseous, whole blood and blood serum. In addition, certain physical and biological parameters were recorded for each animal. The results were analyzed as a 2 x 2 factorial, segregating the effects of age and brisket disease, and the age-disease interaction. The following statistically significant (P<0.05) differences were attributed to the effect of brisket disease: reduction in the percent dry matter and percent ash in all soft tissues studied; increase in cardiac, hepatic and renal calcium and sodium; decrease in serum total calcium; marked decrease in hepatic copper and increase in hepatic iron; decreased blood iron, hematocrit and hemoglobin; decreased hepatic potassium, magnesium and phosphorus; and increased hepatic zinc. The effects of brisket disease are superimposed upon these marked differences in the cattle in the present study as compared to those in a previous study of well nourished cattle of similar breeding from a similar environment: reduced cardiac, hepatic, serum and osseous calcium; reduced hepatic, osseous and serum magnesium and increased renal magnesium; reduced hepatic phosphorus and increased renal phosphorus; reduced hepatic, serum and osseous potassium and increased cardiac potassium; and reduced cardiac, osseous and serum sodium and zinc. The effects of age must be evaluated in view of the fact that half of the animals were diseased; moreover, some age effects occurred almost exclusively in the diseased animals. Statistically significant (P<0.05 ) differences attributed to the effect of age were: decreased phosphorus concentrations in hepatic and renal tissue and serum; increased percent dry matter in hepatic and osseous tissue; increased osseous percent ash; decreased hepatic and osseous potassium; increased serum ionic calcium; and decreased hepatic calcium, magnesium and sodium, all in cows as compared to calves. The interaction of increased age and brisket disease produced the following statistically significant (P<0.05) results: hepatic percent dry matter and iron concentration were increased; hepatic magnesium, potassium and sodium were decreased; and cardiac zinc was increased. Hypotheses regarding possible reasons for these results are formulated and discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph T. Blake, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: Tissue; Mineral; Imbalances; Cattle; Brisket Disease; Animal Sciences; Dairy Science; Life Sciences

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Field, P. H. (1972). Tissue Mineral Imbalances in Cattle with Brisket Disease. (Doctoral Dissertation). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/4586

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Field, Patricia H. “Tissue Mineral Imbalances in Cattle with Brisket Disease.” 1972. Doctoral Dissertation, Utah State University. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/4586.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Field, Patricia H. “Tissue Mineral Imbalances in Cattle with Brisket Disease.” 1972. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Field PH. Tissue Mineral Imbalances in Cattle with Brisket Disease. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Utah State University; 1972. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/4586.

Council of Science Editors:

Field PH. Tissue Mineral Imbalances in Cattle with Brisket Disease. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Utah State University; 1972. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/4586


Utah State University

2. Bailey, David Eugene. Brisket Disease: Influence of Hypoxia and an Induced Calcium-Potassium Imbalance on the Mineral Composition of Blood, Heart, Liver, Kidney, and Bone.

Degree: PhD, Animal, Dairy, and Veterinary Sciences, 1969, Utah State University

Brisket disease, an affliction of cattle, is important because of : (1) economic losses, (2) similarities to chronic mountain sickness in humans, and (3) the provision of experimental animals for cardiac research. In afflicted cattle, right cardiac ventricular hypertrophy and dilatation occur and are manifestations of attempted compensation for reduced alveolar oxygen by increasing pulmonary circulation. Geographic variations in occurrence of brisket disease in Utah indicate that hypoxia is not the sole causative factor. From the findings that afflicted cattle exhibit hypocalcemia and hyperkalemia, and the disease occurs most commonly in wet meadowland environments where potassium is high and calcium low in browse, a dual stress theory of cause was hypothesized; i.e., altitude-induced hypoxia plus ionic calcium-potassium imbalance. To test the hypothesis, 40 Hereford calves were randomized into four equal groups, two at 1,372 meters (normal) and two at 2,745 meters (hypoxic) elevation. At each elevation there were control (balanced) and treated (calcium-potassium) groups. For 16 weeks, treated calves received, by diet, one-fourth the calcium and 10 times the potassium requirements; also, repeated injections of dipotassium ethylenediaminetetraacetate, potassium chloride, and an aldosterone inhibitor to further induce hypocalcemia and hyperkalemia. Control groups at each elevation received a balanced diet and no injections. Since optimal myocardial function is dependent upon proper ion balance, and concentrations of calcium, potassium, sodium, phosphorus, magnesium, chloride, iron, zinc, and copper in blood, heart, liver, kidney, and bone are indices, these elements were quantitated. Calcium concentration in serum was reduced by 1.6 milligrams per 100 milliliters from an initial value of 9.4 milligrams per 100 milliliters, and an average increase of 1.8 milliequivalents per liter in potassium concentration in whole blood, from the initial concentration of 12. 4 milliequivalents per liter, occurred in treated calves . Elevation caused an increase of 1.7 milliequivalents per liter in potassium concentration in serum from the initial concentration of 6.2 milliequivalents per liter. Iron concentration in whole blood increased in response to hypoxia and decreased due to treatment. In the serum, sodium and copper decreased and chloride increased due to treatment. Compared to low elevation, significant tissue compositional changes in calves at high elevation were as follows: (l) calcium: kidney 12 percent higher, heart 9 percent lower: (2) sodium: liver 5 percent lower, kidney 3 percent higher: (2) phosphorus: kidney 2 percent higher. More profound changes occurred in cattle subjected to treatment: compared to controls, the tissue compositions in imbalanced cattle were as follows: (1) calcium: heart 10 percent and liver 13 percent lower, kidney 92 percent higher; (2) potassium: heart 13 percent higher, liver and kidney 6 percent lower; (3) sodium: heart 18 percent, liver 8 percent, and… Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph T. Blake, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: Brisket Disease; Influence of Hypoxia; Calcium-Potassium Imbalance; Toxicology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bailey, D. E. (1969). Brisket Disease: Influence of Hypoxia and an Induced Calcium-Potassium Imbalance on the Mineral Composition of Blood, Heart, Liver, Kidney, and Bone. (Doctoral Dissertation). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3228

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bailey, David Eugene. “Brisket Disease: Influence of Hypoxia and an Induced Calcium-Potassium Imbalance on the Mineral Composition of Blood, Heart, Liver, Kidney, and Bone.” 1969. Doctoral Dissertation, Utah State University. Accessed August 21, 2019. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3228.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bailey, David Eugene. “Brisket Disease: Influence of Hypoxia and an Induced Calcium-Potassium Imbalance on the Mineral Composition of Blood, Heart, Liver, Kidney, and Bone.” 1969. Web. 21 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Bailey DE. Brisket Disease: Influence of Hypoxia and an Induced Calcium-Potassium Imbalance on the Mineral Composition of Blood, Heart, Liver, Kidney, and Bone. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Utah State University; 1969. [cited 2019 Aug 21]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3228.

Council of Science Editors:

Bailey DE. Brisket Disease: Influence of Hypoxia and an Induced Calcium-Potassium Imbalance on the Mineral Composition of Blood, Heart, Liver, Kidney, and Bone. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Utah State University; 1969. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3228

.