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You searched for +publisher:"Utah State University" +contributor:("Gene L. Wooldridge"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Utah State University

1. Malek, Esmaiel. Vertical Mesoscale Water Vapor Flux in an Irrigated Valley.

Degree: PhD, Plants, Soils, and Climate, 1977, Utah State University

To obtain the profiles of dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, specific humidity, q, and air density, ρ, to a height of 200 meters above the ground, a precise lightweight thermocouple psychrometer was designed. To lift the thermocouple psychrometer and the attached wires in obtaining the ρq profiles, a rigid polyethylene balloon augmented with 5.5-feet outdoor or 100-g meteorological balloons were used. Using the height dependent eddy exchange coefficient and a one-dimensional time-dependent profile model, the nighttime variations of ρq as a function of height were predicted and compared with observed values. It was found that the general shape of the eddy exchange coefficient, K(Z), was approximately the same as found in recent literature. Advisors/Committee Members: Gene L. Wooldridge, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: vertical; mesoscale; water; vapor; flux; irrigated; valley; Soil Science

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APA (6th Edition):

Malek, E. (1977). Vertical Mesoscale Water Vapor Flux in an Irrigated Valley. (Doctoral Dissertation). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3821

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Malek, Esmaiel. “Vertical Mesoscale Water Vapor Flux in an Irrigated Valley.” 1977. Doctoral Dissertation, Utah State University. Accessed December 14, 2019. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3821.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Malek, Esmaiel. “Vertical Mesoscale Water Vapor Flux in an Irrigated Valley.” 1977. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Malek E. Vertical Mesoscale Water Vapor Flux in an Irrigated Valley. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Utah State University; 1977. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3821.

Council of Science Editors:

Malek E. Vertical Mesoscale Water Vapor Flux in an Irrigated Valley. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Utah State University; 1977. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3821


Utah State University

2. Lewis, Jackie. Sensitivity Analysis of Surface Deposition in a Numerical Model of Atmospheric Dispersion.

Degree: MS, Ecology, 1976, Utah State University

Profiles of height-dependent diffusion which accommodate site-specific diffusivities were produced. A numerical model was adapted to incorporate the profiles. The model represented three-dimensional steady-state advection and diffusion of aerosols from an elevated point source. Sorption effects were simulated with surface attachment coefficients greater than unity. This proved effective in depleting the plume differentially upward from the surface. Advisors/Committee Members: Gene L. Wooldridge, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: Surface Deposition; Atmospheric Dispersion; Life Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Lewis, J. (1976). Sensitivity Analysis of Surface Deposition in a Numerical Model of Atmospheric Dispersion. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3448

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lewis, Jackie. “Sensitivity Analysis of Surface Deposition in a Numerical Model of Atmospheric Dispersion.” 1976. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed December 14, 2019. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3448.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lewis, Jackie. “Sensitivity Analysis of Surface Deposition in a Numerical Model of Atmospheric Dispersion.” 1976. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Lewis J. Sensitivity Analysis of Surface Deposition in a Numerical Model of Atmospheric Dispersion. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 1976. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3448.

Council of Science Editors:

Lewis J. Sensitivity Analysis of Surface Deposition in a Numerical Model of Atmospheric Dispersion. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 1976. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/3448


Utah State University

3. Neuber, Harvey L. Comparisons of Snow Deposition, Soil Temperature, Matric Potential and Quasi-friction Velocity Between a Windward Site and a Lee Shelter in a Cold Desert.

Degree: MS, Plants, Soils, and Climate, 1984, Utah State University

Regimes of snow depth, soil temperature, soil matric potential and quasi-friction velocity in a windward site and a lee shelter were examined. The differences were analyzed from a biological perspective to .characterize each location in terms of site favorability to plant growth. The chronology of wind and precipitation events was investigated. Snow depth was measured with a system of stakes arranged around and in the interior of a rectangular plot encompassing both a windward site and a lee shelter. Soil temperature, soil matric potential and water potential were measured along a transect which originated in the windward site and terminated in the lee shelter. Soil temperature and water potential were measured by thermocouple psychrometer. Mattie potentials was determined by the pressure-plate method. The regimes of quasi-friction velocity at both ends of the transect were determined by the logarithmic profile method, invoking similarity theory. Wind speed and temperature were measured at two heights in each site. A computer program was used to search the wind and precipitation records and ·categorize and sun the precipitation events by wind direction. The lee shelter exhibited tendencies toward theoretical optima of site favorability. The horizontal distribution of snow maxima was found. to be a function of wind direction at the time of each precipitation event as well as the interaction of wind and the topographical features. Snow was observed to accumulate to a greater depth in the lee shelter than in the windward site. Mean soil temperature over the study period was 8.5° C in the lee shelter while the windward site was 8.0° C. Soil temperature in the lee shelter was never observed to go below 0° C under a snowpack. The range of soil matric potential in the lee shelter was found to be about 14 atm at a depth of 20 cm and about 17 atm at a depth of 50 cm over the summer season. In the windward site the range of soil matric potential was approximately 30 atm at a depth of 20 cm and about 21 atm at a the 50 cm depth over the same period. The lee shelter exhibited lower (less negative) matric potentials than the windward site. These results were not corroborated by the measurement of water potential by thermocouple psychrometers. In the layer from 1.5 to 4.1 m, the mean quasi-friction velocity in the lee shelter was 39 cm s-1, favoring snow deposition there over the windward site where the mean friction velocity was 21 cm s-l. In the 0 m to 1. 5 m layer, mean friction velocity in the windward site was found to be 55 cm s-1.while the lee shelter mean was 48 cm s-1. These results indicate a distinct seperation of flow downwind of the windward site where the lee shelter resides in the turbulent wake of the windward site. Advisors/Committee Members: Gene L. Wooldridge, ;.

Subjects/Keywords: comparisons; snow deposition; soil temperature; matric potential; quasi-friction; windward site; lee shelter; cold desert; Life Sciences

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APA (6th Edition):

Neuber, H. L. (1984). Comparisons of Snow Deposition, Soil Temperature, Matric Potential and Quasi-friction Velocity Between a Windward Site and a Lee Shelter in a Cold Desert. (Masters Thesis). Utah State University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/6381

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Neuber, Harvey L. “Comparisons of Snow Deposition, Soil Temperature, Matric Potential and Quasi-friction Velocity Between a Windward Site and a Lee Shelter in a Cold Desert.” 1984. Masters Thesis, Utah State University. Accessed December 14, 2019. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/6381.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Neuber, Harvey L. “Comparisons of Snow Deposition, Soil Temperature, Matric Potential and Quasi-friction Velocity Between a Windward Site and a Lee Shelter in a Cold Desert.” 1984. Web. 14 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Neuber HL. Comparisons of Snow Deposition, Soil Temperature, Matric Potential and Quasi-friction Velocity Between a Windward Site and a Lee Shelter in a Cold Desert. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Utah State University; 1984. [cited 2019 Dec 14]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/6381.

Council of Science Editors:

Neuber HL. Comparisons of Snow Deposition, Soil Temperature, Matric Potential and Quasi-friction Velocity Between a Windward Site and a Lee Shelter in a Cold Desert. [Masters Thesis]. Utah State University; 1984. Available from: https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/etd/6381

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