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You searched for +publisher:"University of Washington" +contributor:("Joseph, Gail E"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Washington

1. Packard, Miriam Alline. Early Childhood Teachers Improving Together: The Impact on Teacher Noticing of Participation in Video-Mediated Professional Learning Communities within a Teacher Preparation Course.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Washington

As early childhood teachers are increasingly required to enact higher quality teacher-child interactions and pursue higher levels of education, teacher educators need to be able to facilitate effective pedagogies that encourage teachers’ learning. Supporting teachers to learn to notice through video analysis has potential to help them more effectively implement interactions as they learn to attend to, analyze, and decide how to respond to the words and actions of children in order to make intentional pedagogical choices. A randomized control experiment was embedded within a mixed methods research design to understand how to effectively implement video-based professional learning communities within an early childhood teacher preservice education course focused on teacher-child interactions. This study aimed to measure the impact on teachers’ noticing skills. Pretest and posttest video analysis responses were collected from 55 early childhood teachers who were randomly assigned into intervention or control quarter-long online course sections. Concurrently, teacher survey data were gathered to understand participant perceptions of the impact on learning and engagement. Video analysis pretest and posttest data were scored using a Teacher Noticing Coding Measure including three components: ‘attending,’ ‘analyzing,’ and ‘proposing alternative practices.’ Scores were analyzed through two-factor split-plot ANOVA and results of survey ratings and open-ended responses were also calculated and coded. Teachers enrolled in the intervention course section received more intensive facilitation of their video-mediated peer groups and demonstrated improvement on all three Teacher Noticing components from pretest to posttest while reporting high levels of satisfaction and impact on learning. Teachers in the control course section did not receive this facilitation and improved only in the first two Teacher Noticing components and declined from pretest to posttest on ‘proposing alternative practices’ scores, resulting in a statistically significant within-between subjects interaction effect between time and course section. They also reported much lower levels of satisfaction and impact on learning. Findings have implications for several aspects of early childhood teacher preparation, including video-mediated coursework design and facilitation, experimental and mixed methods design, and Teacher Noticing measurement. Keywords: early childhood teacher education, teacher noticing, video pedagogies, professional learning communities, teacher-child interactions, online teaching and learning Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph, Gail E (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: early childhood teacher education; online teaching and learning; professional learning communities; teacher-child interactions; teacher noticing; video pedagogies; Teacher education; Early childhood education; Pedagogy; Education - Seattle

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Packard, M. A. (2019). Early Childhood Teachers Improving Together: The Impact on Teacher Noticing of Participation in Video-Mediated Professional Learning Communities within a Teacher Preparation Course. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43677

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Packard, Miriam Alline. “Early Childhood Teachers Improving Together: The Impact on Teacher Noticing of Participation in Video-Mediated Professional Learning Communities within a Teacher Preparation Course.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43677.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Packard, Miriam Alline. “Early Childhood Teachers Improving Together: The Impact on Teacher Noticing of Participation in Video-Mediated Professional Learning Communities within a Teacher Preparation Course.” 2019. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Packard MA. Early Childhood Teachers Improving Together: The Impact on Teacher Noticing of Participation in Video-Mediated Professional Learning Communities within a Teacher Preparation Course. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43677.

Council of Science Editors:

Packard MA. Early Childhood Teachers Improving Together: The Impact on Teacher Noticing of Participation in Video-Mediated Professional Learning Communities within a Teacher Preparation Course. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43677

2. Klinman, Douglas. Functioning of Standardized Self-Report Measures for Caregivers with Active Child Welfare Service Cases.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Washington

The purpose of this dissertation was to assist in the development of an assessment system that supports caseworkers in Child Welfare Service (CWS) in making informed decision regarding the families they are serving. Caseworkers CWS have a difficult job of protecting and promoting the well-being of vulnerable children. To accomplish this task, they need assessment tools that both predict future maltreatment and provide guidance on family functioning, service need, and treatment progress. This dissertation presents two studies that examine the results of seven standardized self-report assessments obtained from 318 caregivers involved with CWS (235 families) whose children are in their care, and attempts to use these data to address some of the assessment needs in CWS. Study 1 examined the standardized assessment results and used survival analysis to determine whether the assessments were independently predictive of future child maltreatment and whether they added predictive value to the Structured Decision Making (SDM) tool used by CWS. Due to the coercive nature of caregivers involvement with CWS, the data were analyzed separately for caregivers who were categorized as reporting non-defensively and defensively on the Parent Stress Index. The assessment results for caregivers who were categorized as non-defensive provided insights into the families' struggles and added predictive value both independently and additionally when included in survival analysis with the SDM. For defensive caregivers, the assessments did not appear to provide insights into their struggles, and scores were not predictive of future child maltreatment. The results indicated no significant difference in survival time between the defensive and non-defensive caregivers. Furthermore, caseworkers appeared to struggle with the assessment of the defensive responders, as indicated by the SDMs lack of predictive value for these families. Study 2 examined how the data from the non-defensive responders could be used to develop a self-report multidimensional assessment of caregivers involved with CWS. Item Response Theory (IRT) was used to examine the functioning of items on two of the administered assessments. The results indicated both adequate item difficulty and item discrimination parameters. IRT was used to reduce the assessment length, resulting in shorter scales with similar predictive validity. Lastly, the study investigated how IRT can assist in the development of assessment tools that address assessment needs of CWS including potentially being resistant to the defensive responding of caregivers. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph, Gail E (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Child welfare; Item Response Theory (IRT); Reliability; Risk assessment; Standardized measures; Validity; Social work; Psychology; education - seattle

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Klinman, D. (2014). Functioning of Standardized Self-Report Measures for Caregivers with Active Child Welfare Service Cases. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25490

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Klinman, Douglas. “Functioning of Standardized Self-Report Measures for Caregivers with Active Child Welfare Service Cases.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25490.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Klinman, Douglas. “Functioning of Standardized Self-Report Measures for Caregivers with Active Child Welfare Service Cases.” 2014. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Klinman D. Functioning of Standardized Self-Report Measures for Caregivers with Active Child Welfare Service Cases. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25490.

Council of Science Editors:

Klinman D. Functioning of Standardized Self-Report Measures for Caregivers with Active Child Welfare Service Cases. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25490

3. Brennan, Carolyn. Challenging behaviors in infant and toddler non-parental care: An exploration of caregiver beliefs and response strategies.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Washington

The number of children under the age of three spending time in non-parental care has increased over the last three decades. In order to promote optimal development, children and their caregivers must develop secure and nurturing relationships. The current body of literature suggests that challenging behaviors can disrupt these relationships. This study builds upon this literature by focusing on the experiences of children under the age of three and their caregivers in both child care centers (CCC) and family child care homes (FCC). The current study analyzes survey data from 272 infant and toddler child care providers in Washington state, CCC = 79, FCC = 193. Survey items focus on experiences with, and knowledge of, challenging behaviors (aggressive, disruptive, and challenging behaviors of infancy). They also ask about caregiver expertise, job stress and program characteristics. Qualitative responses were coded using a combination of inductive and deductive coding categories. A priori codes were selected from the literature on challenging behaviors and supportive responses suggested by the Center on the Social Emotional Foundations for Early Learning (CSEFEL). The current study uses multiple linear regression to determine the influence of predictor variables (e.g. provider expertise, stress, and program characteristics) on caregiver responses to challenging behaviors. The caregiver Strategy Support Score (SSS) is a measure of strategies used by caregivers when children demonstrate challenging behaviors and serves as the outcome variable. An exploratory, supplementary logistic regression model is also run to further investigate the impact of these variables on responses to challenging behavior; the use of timeout serves as the outcome variable for this model. Descriptive data related to frequency of behaviors, the meaning that caregivers attribute to behaviors, and the rate of expulsion are discussed. Differences between FCC and CCC experiences are explored. The results of the current study indicate that aggressive behaviors are commonly experienced and identified as difficult to work with by infant and toddler caregivers. There appear, however, to be differences in the ways that FCC and CCC providers experience these behaviors. Caregivers use a mix of CSEFEL and other strategies when presented with challenging behaviors. Working with families appears to be infrequent, particularly in response to aggressive behaviors. Children under the age of three appear to be expelled at lower rates than their older peers. Access to training, level of caregiver education, and class size appear to have the most robust influences on SSS. Advisors/Committee Members: Joseph, Gail E (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: caregiver; challenging behavior; child care; infant; toddler; Early childhood education; education - seattle

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brennan, C. (2013). Challenging behaviors in infant and toddler non-parental care: An exploration of caregiver beliefs and response strategies. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/23615

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brennan, Carolyn. “Challenging behaviors in infant and toddler non-parental care: An exploration of caregiver beliefs and response strategies.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed October 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/23615.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brennan, Carolyn. “Challenging behaviors in infant and toddler non-parental care: An exploration of caregiver beliefs and response strategies.” 2013. Web. 16 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Brennan C. Challenging behaviors in infant and toddler non-parental care: An exploration of caregiver beliefs and response strategies. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/23615.

Council of Science Editors:

Brennan C. Challenging behaviors in infant and toddler non-parental care: An exploration of caregiver beliefs and response strategies. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/23615

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