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You searched for +publisher:"University of Washington" +contributor:("Baker, David"). Showing records 1 – 30 of 31 total matches.

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University of Washington

1. Vulovic, Ivan. Software Algorithms for Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes Applied to Cryo-Electron Microscopy Scaffolds and Antibody Nanoparticles.

Degree: PhD, 2020, University of Washington

 Innovation in the symmetric assembly and protein material design space has the potential to – eventually – reinvent medicine and nanotechnology. One leading strategy for… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: genetic fusion; protein design; Biochemistry; Molecular engineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Vulovic, I. (2020). Software Algorithms for Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes Applied to Cryo-Electron Microscopy Scaffolds and Antibody Nanoparticles. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/45809

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vulovic, Ivan. “Software Algorithms for Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes Applied to Cryo-Electron Microscopy Scaffolds and Antibody Nanoparticles.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/45809.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vulovic, Ivan. “Software Algorithms for Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes Applied to Cryo-Electron Microscopy Scaffolds and Antibody Nanoparticles.” 2020. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Vulovic I. Software Algorithms for Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes Applied to Cryo-Electron Microscopy Scaffolds and Antibody Nanoparticles. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2020. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/45809.

Council of Science Editors:

Vulovic I. Software Algorithms for Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes Applied to Cryo-Electron Microscopy Scaffolds and Antibody Nanoparticles. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/45809


University of Washington

2. Dou, Jiayi. Exploring the Molecular Design of Ligand Binding Sites by Computational Protein Design.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 Ligand binding sites in natural proteins, with diverse structural details, provide the foundation for enzymatic activity, antibody-antigen recognition, ligand-induced pathway activation and drug discovery in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: computational protein design; de novo proteins; DFHBI; ligand binding proteins; small molecule binding; steroid; Biochemistry; Molecular biology; Biophysics; Bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Dou, J. (2017). Exploring the Molecular Design of Ligand Binding Sites by Computational Protein Design. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39951

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dou, Jiayi. “Exploring the Molecular Design of Ligand Binding Sites by Computational Protein Design.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39951.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dou, Jiayi. “Exploring the Molecular Design of Ligand Binding Sites by Computational Protein Design.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Dou J. Exploring the Molecular Design of Ligand Binding Sites by Computational Protein Design. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39951.

Council of Science Editors:

Dou J. Exploring the Molecular Design of Ligand Binding Sites by Computational Protein Design. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39951


University of Washington

3. Lin, Yu-Ru. Insight from designing ideal αβ monomers and homo-oligomers.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 Previously, general principles relating secondary structure patterns to tertiary packing motifs enable design of different protein topologies stabilized by consistent local and non-local interactions. With… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: De novo protein; Protein Design; Rosetta Design; Biochemistry; Molecular biology; Nanoscience; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Lin, Y. (2017). Insight from designing ideal αβ monomers and homo-oligomers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39956

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lin, Yu-Ru. “Insight from designing ideal αβ monomers and homo-oligomers.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39956.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lin, Yu-Ru. “Insight from designing ideal αβ monomers and homo-oligomers.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Lin Y. Insight from designing ideal αβ monomers and homo-oligomers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39956.

Council of Science Editors:

Lin Y. Insight from designing ideal αβ monomers and homo-oligomers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39956


University of Washington

4. Dang, Luke Thomas. Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 Wnt signaling is essential to a range of critical biologic processes including embryonic development, mature tissue maintenance, and cell proliferation. Dysregulation of the Wnt signaling… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Ankyrin Repeat Protein; Computational Protein Design; Frizzled; Protein Engineering; Rosetta; Wnt Signaling; Molecular biology; Biochemistry; Biomedical engineering; Molecular and cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Dang, L. T. (2017). Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40260

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dang, Luke Thomas. “Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40260.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dang, Luke Thomas. “Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Dang LT. Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40260.

Council of Science Editors:

Dang LT. Computational Design and Optimization of Novel Subtype Specific Frizzled Binding Proteins for Modulation of Wnt Signaling. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40260


University of Washington

5. Hsia, Yang. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit icosahedral nanocage.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 The icosahedron is the largest of the Platonic solids, and icosahedral protein structures are widely used in biological systems for packaging and transport1,2. There has… (more)

Subjects/Keywords:

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APA (6th Edition):

Hsia, Y. (2017). Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit icosahedral nanocage. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40491

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hsia, Yang. “Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit icosahedral nanocage.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40491.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hsia, Yang. “Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit icosahedral nanocage.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hsia Y. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit icosahedral nanocage. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40491.

Council of Science Editors:

Hsia Y. Design of a hyperstable 60-subunit icosahedral nanocage. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40491


University of Washington

6. Ovchinnikov, Sergey. Protein structure determination using evolutionary information.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 For billions of years, nature has been conducting the greatest experiment of all time. Imagine one day gaining access to the detailed notes from these… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Coevolution; GREMLIN; Protein; ROSETTA; Structure prediction; Biochemistry; Bioinformatics; Biology; Molecular and cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Ovchinnikov, S. (2017). Protein structure determination using evolutionary information. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40652

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ovchinnikov, Sergey. “Protein structure determination using evolutionary information.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40652.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ovchinnikov, Sergey. “Protein structure determination using evolutionary information.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Ovchinnikov S. Protein structure determination using evolutionary information. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40652.

Council of Science Editors:

Ovchinnikov S. Protein structure determination using evolutionary information. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40652


University of Washington

7. Bryan, Cassie Marie. Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Washington

 Computational protein design has recently advanced to a new era with the de novo design of stable proteins targeting native protein ligands. In this dissertation,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Computational Design; PD-1; Protein Design; Protein Engineering; Yeast Display; Biochemistry; Bioengineering; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Bryan, C. M. (2018). Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40848

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bryan, Cassie Marie. “Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40848.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bryan, Cassie Marie. “Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1.” 2018. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Bryan CM. Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40848.

Council of Science Editors:

Bryan CM. Computational Design of Hyperstable, De Novo Miniproteins Targeting PD-1. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40848


University of Washington

8. Ford, Alexander. Nonparametric Structure Models in Local Protein Conformation Sampling and Design.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Washington

 Protein design relies of the identification of a sequence that specifically encodes a target conformation as a folded native state. This native states is encoded… (more)

Subjects/Keywords:

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APA (6th Edition):

Ford, A. (2018). Nonparametric Structure Models in Local Protein Conformation Sampling and Design. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/41742

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ford, Alexander. “Nonparametric Structure Models in Local Protein Conformation Sampling and Design.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/41742.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ford, Alexander. “Nonparametric Structure Models in Local Protein Conformation Sampling and Design.” 2018. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Ford A. Nonparametric Structure Models in Local Protein Conformation Sampling and Design. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/41742.

Council of Science Editors:

Ford A. Nonparametric Structure Models in Local Protein Conformation Sampling and Design. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/41742


University of Washington

9. Nelson, Jorgen. Directed evolution and de novo design for improved pathogen-targeting protein drugs.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Washington

 Infectious diseases continue to claim millions of lives, and protein design with Rosetta is quickly becoming a contributor to the fight against these diseases. My… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: malaria; rosetta; Biochemistry; Bioengineering; Genetics

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APA (6th Edition):

Nelson, J. (2018). Directed evolution and de novo design for improved pathogen-targeting protein drugs. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42368

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nelson, Jorgen. “Directed evolution and de novo design for improved pathogen-targeting protein drugs.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42368.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nelson, Jorgen. “Directed evolution and de novo design for improved pathogen-targeting protein drugs.” 2018. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Nelson J. Directed evolution and de novo design for improved pathogen-targeting protein drugs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42368.

Council of Science Editors:

Nelson J. Directed evolution and de novo design for improved pathogen-targeting protein drugs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/42368


University of Washington

10. Chevalier, Aaron. Computational design and optimization of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel binders of Influenza Hemagglutinin.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

 Influenza is a serious public health concern and new therapeutics that protect against this highly adaptable virus are urgently needed. For this dissertation my efforts… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biomedical engineering; bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Chevalier, A. (2015). Computational design and optimization of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel binders of Influenza Hemagglutinin. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33101

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chevalier, Aaron. “Computational design and optimization of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel binders of Influenza Hemagglutinin.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33101.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chevalier, Aaron. “Computational design and optimization of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel binders of Influenza Hemagglutinin.” 2015. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Chevalier A. Computational design and optimization of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel binders of Influenza Hemagglutinin. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33101.

Council of Science Editors:

Chevalier A. Computational design and optimization of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel binders of Influenza Hemagglutinin. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33101


University of Washington

11. Day, Austin L. Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

 Protein design is still in its infancy, yet there have been many impressive examples of success in designing proteins to fold into a predictable structure,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Computational; Ligand; Methods; Protein Design; Protein Engineering; Small Molecule; Biomedical engineering; Biochemistry; bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Day, A. L. (2015). Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33592

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Day, Austin L. “Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33592.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Day, Austin L. “Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins.” 2015. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Day AL. Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33592.

Council of Science Editors:

Day AL. Computational Design of Small Molecule Binding Proteins. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33592


University of Washington

12. Yu, Shawn. Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

 Interleukin-2 is a cytokine that plays a central role in immune system homeostasis, exerting paradoxical immunostimulatory and immunoregulatory effects based on its interactions with various… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: computational design; interleukin-2; protein design; protein engineering; Rosetta; Biochemistry; Immunology; bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Yu, S. (2015). Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33593

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yu, Shawn. “Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33593.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yu, Shawn. “Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics.” 2015. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Yu S. Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33593.

Council of Science Editors:

Yu S. Computational design of interleukin-2 mimetics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33593


University of Washington

13. Wang, Yu-Ruei. Protein Structure Determination from Cryo-electron Microscopy Density Maps.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

 Single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) has emerged as a powerful tool in structure determination of macromolecular complexes that are not suitable for crystallographic studies. Recent advances… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cryo-EM; electron density map; Model building; Rosetta; Structure determination; Structure prediction; Biochemistry; Bioinformatics; biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Wang, Y. (2015). Protein Structure Determination from Cryo-electron Microscopy Density Maps. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33597

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Yu-Ruei. “Protein Structure Determination from Cryo-electron Microscopy Density Maps.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33597.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Yu-Ruei. “Protein Structure Determination from Cryo-electron Microscopy Density Maps.” 2015. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Wang Y. Protein Structure Determination from Cryo-electron Microscopy Density Maps. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33597.

Council of Science Editors:

Wang Y. Protein Structure Determination from Cryo-electron Microscopy Density Maps. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/33597


University of Washington

14. Bale, Jacob Barile. Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Washington

 Molecular self- and co-assembly of proteins into highly ordered symmetric complexes is an elegant and powerful means of patterning matter at the atomic scale and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: co-assembly; computational protein design; nanomaterials; polyhedra; self-assembly; structural biology; Biochemistry; Nanoscience; Engineering; molecular and cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Bale, J. B. (2016). Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35263

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bale, Jacob Barile. “Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35263.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bale, Jacob Barile. “Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials.” 2016. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Bale JB. Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35263.

Council of Science Editors:

Bale JB. Computational design of co-assembling multi-component protein nanomaterials. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/35263


University of Washington

15. Butterfield, Gabriel Lang. Evolution of Synthetic Nucleocapsids Encapsulating their own RNA genome.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Washington

 Viruses are the simplest example of a fundamental feature of biology— they maintain genotype phenotype linkage in complex biochemical environments by encapsulating and protecting a… (more)

Subjects/Keywords:

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APA (6th Edition):

Butterfield, G. L. (2018). Evolution of Synthetic Nucleocapsids Encapsulating their own RNA genome. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43109

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Butterfield, Gabriel Lang. “Evolution of Synthetic Nucleocapsids Encapsulating their own RNA genome.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43109.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Butterfield, Gabriel Lang. “Evolution of Synthetic Nucleocapsids Encapsulating their own RNA genome.” 2018. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Butterfield GL. Evolution of Synthetic Nucleocapsids Encapsulating their own RNA genome. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43109.

Council of Science Editors:

Butterfield GL. Evolution of Synthetic Nucleocapsids Encapsulating their own RNA genome. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43109


University of Washington

16. Ueda, George Thomas. Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Washington

 Using a newly developed computational docking and scoring method combined with Rosetta two-sided interface design, we demonstrated accurate design of self-assembling oligomeric proteins that exhibit… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biotherapeutic; Computational; Design; Engineering; Protein; Vaccine; Biochemistry; Bioengineering; Computational chemistry; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Ueda, G. T. (2019). Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43303

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ueda, George Thomas. “Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43303.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ueda, George Thomas. “Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development.” 2019. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Ueda GT. Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43303.

Council of Science Editors:

Ueda GT. Computational Design of Symmetric Protein Complexes with Implications for Vaccine and Biotherapeutic Development. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43303


University of Washington

17. Haydon, Ian. De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design.

Degree: 2019, University of Washington

 Control over enzymatic catalysis is a central goal of biotechnology. Recent advances in computational protein design are beginning to allow for the de novo creation… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: computational biology; enzymes; protein design; protein engineering; Biochemistry; Bioengineering; Biophysics; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Haydon, I. (2019). De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design. (Thesis). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43305

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haydon, Ian. “De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design.” 2019. Thesis, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43305.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haydon, Ian. “De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design.” 2019. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Haydon I. De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43305.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haydon I. De novo protein fusions as platforms for enzyme design. [Thesis]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43305

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Washington

18. Basanta, Benjamin. Beyond single-protein de novo design: A generative algorithm for the NTF2-like superfamily.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Washington

 Natural proteins evolved over billions of years to regulate cellular growth, ward off infection and capture and store solar energy. Proteins thus serve as the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Computational Biology; generative algorithm; generative design; High-throughput screening; Protein design; Biochemistry; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Basanta, B. (2019). Beyond single-protein de novo design: A generative algorithm for the NTF2-like superfamily. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43640

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Basanta, Benjamin. “Beyond single-protein de novo design: A generative algorithm for the NTF2-like superfamily.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43640.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Basanta, Benjamin. “Beyond single-protein de novo design: A generative algorithm for the NTF2-like superfamily.” 2019. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Basanta B. Beyond single-protein de novo design: A generative algorithm for the NTF2-like superfamily. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43640.

Council of Science Editors:

Basanta B. Beyond single-protein de novo design: A generative algorithm for the NTF2-like superfamily. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43640


University of Washington

19. Koepnick, Brian. Protein design by citizen scientists.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Washington

 Proteins are a class of molecule best known for their tendency to fold into well-defined 3-dimensional structures. The structure of a protein is determined by… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: citizen science; crowdsource; Foldit; protein design; Bioengineering; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Koepnick, B. (2019). Protein design by citizen scientists. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43642

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Koepnick, Brian. “Protein design by citizen scientists.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43642.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Koepnick, Brian. “Protein design by citizen scientists.” 2019. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Koepnick B. Protein design by citizen scientists. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43642.

Council of Science Editors:

Koepnick B. Protein design by citizen scientists. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43642


University of Washington

20. Smith, Matthew. Computational Design and Directed Evolution of Novel Enzymes.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Washington

 Enzymes are the most specific and active catalysts found in nature, and offer unique chemical properties suited to solving important industrial, medical, and environmental problems.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: alkyltransferase; computational design; directed evolution; enzymes; esterase; Biochemistry; molecular and cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Smith, M. (2013). Computational Design and Directed Evolution of Novel Enzymes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24224

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Matthew. “Computational Design and Directed Evolution of Novel Enzymes.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24224.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Matthew. “Computational Design and Directed Evolution of Novel Enzymes.” 2013. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Smith M. Computational Design and Directed Evolution of Novel Enzymes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24224.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith M. Computational Design and Directed Evolution of Novel Enzymes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/24224


University of Washington

21. Moody, James. Computational design of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel inhibitors of the p53 pathway and the polycomb repressive complex.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Washington

 Here I present 2 examples of the application of the Rosetta macromolecular modeling software suite to the successful development of novel protein-based inhibitors with the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biotechnology; Computational; Design; Mdmx; PRC2; Protein; Biochemistry; molecular and cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Moody, J. (2014). Computational design of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel inhibitors of the p53 pathway and the polycomb repressive complex. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26172

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Moody, James. “Computational design of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel inhibitors of the p53 pathway and the polycomb repressive complex.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26172.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Moody, James. “Computational design of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel inhibitors of the p53 pathway and the polycomb repressive complex.” 2014. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Moody J. Computational design of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel inhibitors of the p53 pathway and the polycomb repressive complex. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26172.

Council of Science Editors:

Moody J. Computational design of protein-protein interactions to engineer novel inhibitors of the p53 pathway and the polycomb repressive complex. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/26172


University of Washington

22. Richter, Florian. Computational de-novo design of ester hydrolases.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Washington

 Computational protein design is a relatively new technique used to devise amino acid sequences to fold into proteins having novel structures or functions. Here, we… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: catalysis; computational protein design; enzyme design; hydrolysis; synthetic biology; Biochemistry; Chemistry; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Richter, F. (2013). Computational de-novo design of ester hydrolases. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21829

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Richter, Florian. “Computational de-novo design of ester hydrolases.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21829.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Richter, Florian. “Computational de-novo design of ester hydrolases.” 2013. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Richter F. Computational de-novo design of ester hydrolases. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21829.

Council of Science Editors:

Richter F. Computational de-novo design of ester hydrolases. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/21829


University of Washington

23. Kellogg, Elizabeth Hua-Mei. Assessing and Improving Computational Models of Protein Thermodynamics and Kinetics.

Degree: PhD, 2013, University of Washington

 The purpose of this thesis is to rigorously assess and improve computational models of protein thermodynamics and kinetics. The first part consists of computational ddG… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: ddG prediction; markov state model; protein structure; Rosetta; Biochemistry; Biophysics; biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Kellogg, E. H. (2013). Assessing and Improving Computational Models of Protein Thermodynamics and Kinetics. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/22430

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kellogg, Elizabeth Hua-Mei. “Assessing and Improving Computational Models of Protein Thermodynamics and Kinetics.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/22430.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kellogg, Elizabeth Hua-Mei. “Assessing and Improving Computational Models of Protein Thermodynamics and Kinetics.” 2013. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Kellogg EH. Assessing and Improving Computational Models of Protein Thermodynamics and Kinetics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/22430.

Council of Science Editors:

Kellogg EH. Assessing and Improving Computational Models of Protein Thermodynamics and Kinetics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/22430


University of Washington

24. Berger, Stephanie. Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 BCL2 family proteins regulate apoptosis and thus play a critical role in tissue homeostasis and development in healthy cells. A number of pathologies exploit the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: apoptosis; BCL2; cancer; computational protein design; Molecular biology; Biomedical engineering; Biochemistry; Bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Berger, S. (2017). Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39947

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Berger, Stephanie. “Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39947.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Berger, Stephanie. “Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Berger S. Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39947.

Council of Science Editors:

Berger S. Controlling apoptosis with computationally designed inhibitors targeting pro-survival and pro-apoptosis BCL2 family members. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/39947


University of Washington

25. Younger, David Aaron. High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Washington

 High-throughput methods for screening protein-protein interactions enable the rapid characterization of engineered binding proteins and interaction networks. While existing approaches are powerful, none allow quantitative… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: High-throughput screening; Protein Engineering; Protein-protein interaction networks; Synthetic Biology; Yeast Mating; Biomedical engineering; Biochemistry; Cellular biology; Bioengineering

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APA (6th Edition):

Younger, D. A. (2017). High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40488

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Younger, David Aaron. “High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40488.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Younger, David Aaron. “High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Younger DA. High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40488.

Council of Science Editors:

Younger DA. High-Throughput Characterization of Protein-Protein Interactions by Reprogramming Yeast Mating. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/40488


University of Washington

26. Chen, Zibo. Programmable Design of Protein Interaction Specificity and Logic Gates.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Washington

 The binding specificity of DNA molecules is straightforward: adenine binds thymine, and cytosine binds guanine. This simple encoding of specificity enables the binding between two… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biophysics; Computational biology; Structural biology; Biochemistry; Biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Chen, Z. (2019). Programmable Design of Protein Interaction Specificity and Logic Gates. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43306

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Zibo. “Programmable Design of Protein Interaction Specificity and Logic Gates.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43306.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Zibo. “Programmable Design of Protein Interaction Specificity and Logic Gates.” 2019. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Chen Z. Programmable Design of Protein Interaction Specificity and Logic Gates. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43306.

Council of Science Editors:

Chen Z. Programmable Design of Protein Interaction Specificity and Logic Gates. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/43306

27. Conway, Patrick. Improving The Energy Function Used In Rosetta For Protein Structure Prediction and Design.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Washington

 Protein structure prediction and design relies on conformational sampling and scoring to uncover a global energy minimum. While it is critical to have an accurate… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biochemistry; biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Conway, P. (2015). Improving The Energy Function Used In Rosetta For Protein Structure Prediction and Design. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/27414

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Conway, Patrick. “Improving The Energy Function Used In Rosetta For Protein Structure Prediction and Design.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/27414.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Conway, Patrick. “Improving The Energy Function Used In Rosetta For Protein Structure Prediction and Design.” 2015. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Conway P. Improving The Energy Function Used In Rosetta For Protein Structure Prediction and Design. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/27414.

Council of Science Editors:

Conway P. Improving The Energy Function Used In Rosetta For Protein Structure Prediction and Design. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/27414

28. Castellanos, Javier Ignacio. Iterative Multistate Negative Design of protein folds.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Washington

Subjects/Keywords: Protein Design; Biochemistry; biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

Castellanos, J. I. (2014). Iterative Multistate Negative Design of protein folds. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25971

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Castellanos, Javier Ignacio. “Iterative Multistate Negative Design of protein folds.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25971.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Castellanos, Javier Ignacio. “Iterative Multistate Negative Design of protein folds.” 2014. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Castellanos JI. Iterative Multistate Negative Design of protein folds. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25971.

Council of Science Editors:

Castellanos JI. Iterative Multistate Negative Design of protein folds. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25971

29. King, Chris. Computational Design of Protein Therapeutics with Reduced Immunogenicity through Structural Modeling of Protein Interactions.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Washington

 Proteins possess huge potential as therapeutic agents for the control and modulation of human physiology. Protein interactions regulate most physiological processes, mediating the connection between… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: biotherapeutics; deimmunization; machine learning; molecular modeling; protein design; Biochemistry; Bioinformatics; Biophysics; biological chemistry

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APA (6th Edition):

King, C. (2014). Computational Design of Protein Therapeutics with Reduced Immunogenicity through Structural Modeling of Protein Interactions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25382

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

King, Chris. “Computational Design of Protein Therapeutics with Reduced Immunogenicity through Structural Modeling of Protein Interactions.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25382.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

King, Chris. “Computational Design of Protein Therapeutics with Reduced Immunogenicity through Structural Modeling of Protein Interactions.” 2014. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

King C. Computational Design of Protein Therapeutics with Reduced Immunogenicity through Structural Modeling of Protein Interactions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25382.

Council of Science Editors:

King C. Computational Design of Protein Therapeutics with Reduced Immunogenicity through Structural Modeling of Protein Interactions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25382

30. Boissel, Sandrine. megaTALs: a novel rare-cleaving nuclease platform for therapeutic genome engineering.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Washington

 Rare-cleaving endonucleases have emerged as important tools for making targeted genome modifications. While multiple platforms are now available to generate reagents for research applications, each… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: genome engineering; megaTAL; nuclease; Molecular biology; molecular and cellular biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Boissel, S. (2014). megaTALs: a novel rare-cleaving nuclease platform for therapeutic genome engineering. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Washington. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25103

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boissel, Sandrine. “megaTALs: a novel rare-cleaving nuclease platform for therapeutic genome engineering.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Washington. Accessed January 20, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25103.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boissel, Sandrine. “megaTALs: a novel rare-cleaving nuclease platform for therapeutic genome engineering.” 2014. Web. 20 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Boissel S. megaTALs: a novel rare-cleaving nuclease platform for therapeutic genome engineering. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25103.

Council of Science Editors:

Boissel S. megaTALs: a novel rare-cleaving nuclease platform for therapeutic genome engineering. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Washington; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1773/25103

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