Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Waikato" +contributor:("Twiname, Linda J"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. De Witt, Marlize. Discretion in Decision Making: The Fonterra Case .

Degree: 2017, University of Waikato

Management literature adopt the definition of discretion as “latitude of action” and it is typically researched as freedom of decision making associated with positions in the upper echelons of organisations. This is a narrow view of discretion which underestimates the exercise of discretion irrespective of organisational prescription. The aim of this study was to examine the exercise of discretion across organisational levels, guided by the overarching question: “How do employees use discretion in the workplace?” Valuable insight about the use of discretion by all employees was gained. In addition, the study contributed to a better understanding of the role of personal belief systems in discretionary decision making – an existing gap in the current research on discretion in the management field. Discretion is about individuals’ freedom of choice, based on their internal beliefs, values and principles. The best way to understand this individual social process was to examine it from the point of view of the decision maker, and therefore a subjectivist research position was adopted. A phenomenological approach allowed the examination of participants’ concepts and pursuits of discretion in their work environment, accessed through face-to-face interaction. Fonterra was chosen as an ideal case for this study since it was representative of other large businesses, but also unique due to the company’s different struggles within the dairy industry. The data was coded and analysed in Atlas.ti. to identify major themes as it emerged from the experiences shared by participants. Results supported the notion of discretion as a bilateral phenomenon in the form of intrinsic and extrinsic discretion, exercised across organisational levels. It was found that interpersonal factors such as management style and collaboration with colleagues in the judgement phase of decision making encouraged employees to engage in discretionary decision making. Certain organisational factors were found to discourage the use of discretion. Factors associated with internal and external organisational good (as theorised by MacIntyre) were however experienced differently: employees felt positive about restrictions on their discretion if it was associated with the internal good of the organisation; but negative about restrictions associated with the external good of the organisation. It was determined that employees strongly identified with organisational values, which seemed to act as surrogate values in the absence of clearly defined personal values. Conclusions drawn from this study were that discretion was not only an allocated level of leeway associated with organisational positions, but was associated with individuals who occupy those positions. This was clear from the examples of important discretionary decisions made by employees on lower organisational levels. Organisations need to be aware of the significant role that management style and employee collaboration play in the willingness of employees to use their discretion. Organisations… Advisors/Committee Members: Pavlovich, Kathryn (advisor), Twiname, Linda J (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Discretion; Decision making; Ethical decision making; MacIntyre; Case study; Fonterra; Phenomenology

Page 1 Page 2

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

De Witt, M. (2017). Discretion in Decision Making: The Fonterra Case . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11260

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

De Witt, Marlize. “Discretion in Decision Making: The Fonterra Case .” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11260.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

De Witt, Marlize. “Discretion in Decision Making: The Fonterra Case .” 2017. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

De Witt M. Discretion in Decision Making: The Fonterra Case . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11260.

Council of Science Editors:

De Witt M. Discretion in Decision Making: The Fonterra Case . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11260


University of Waikato

2. Piercy, Gemma Louise. Baristas: The artisan precariat .

Degree: 2018, University of Waikato

My research on the work identit(ies) of baristas demonstrates that different workplaces, in conjunction with individual biographies, produce different kinds of work identities. Connected to these differences are the actual and perceived levels of skill and/or social status ascribed to workers within the service work triadic relationship (customers, coworkers/managers and workers). The higher the level of skill or social status, the greater the capacity of workers to experience more autonomy in their work and/or access improved working conditions. These findings are informed by my research approach, which incorporates three key methods: key informant interviews; observation/participant observation; life history interviews; all of which is underpinned by the mystory approach and autoethnography. My findings from the case study research on the barista work identity are expressed in the following. (1) The different work identities within a specific occupation contribute to the heterogeneity of service workers and service work. This heterogeneity, in turn, obscures the range of skills utilised in the technical and presentational labour mobilised in service work. The skills are obscured by the social and practice-based nature of knowledge transmission in service work like that of baristas, as well as by the dynamic and shifting alliances that may occur in the triadic relationship of customer, workers and employer/manager. (2) Interactive service workers are involved in providing labour or work that is more complex than is socially understood and recognised. This complexity stems from the ways in which presentational labour is commodified, appropriated and mobilised in the workplace within the spaces of the organisational context, internal practices, and the service encounter. (3) I further argue that service workers are also dehumanised as part of the service encounter through the structure of capitalism, specifically the application of commodity fetishism to workers by customers, colleagues, managers, capital and at times themselves. Commodity fetishism dehumanises workers, creating an empathy gap between customers/managers and workers. As such, the commodity fetishisation of service workers also reinforces and promotes compliance with the insecure and precarious employment practices common to occupations in the service sector. (4) As the conditions of precarious work continue to spread, the employment relationship is being altered in relation to consumption practices. Based on this shift in employment relations, I argue that we are moving towards a labour market and society shaped by the practices of the consumer society as well as the traditional production-based economy. However, the increasing influence of consumption practices stems from neoliberal inspired changes in employment relationships rather than the consumer society emphasis on agentic identity projects. As such, the self-determining identity projects highlighted by researchers engaged in aspects of service work and consumption-based research also need to… Advisors/Committee Members: Rinehart, Robert E (advisor), Paterson, John (advisor), Twiname, Linda J (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: interactive service work; consumption; third wave of coffee; identity; precariat; craft-washing; commodity fetishism

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Piercy, G. L. (2018). Baristas: The artisan precariat . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/12038

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Piercy, Gemma Louise. “Baristas: The artisan precariat .” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/12038.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Piercy, Gemma Louise. “Baristas: The artisan precariat .” 2018. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Piercy GL. Baristas: The artisan precariat . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/12038.

Council of Science Editors:

Piercy GL. Baristas: The artisan precariat . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/12038

3. Panitcharoen, Pochara. The impact of autonomy on the effectiveness of universities in Thailand .

Degree: 2017, University of Waikato

Since the 1990s the Thai Government has worked to reform higher education to meet a need for greater effectiveness in public universities. Long established bureaucratic systems were judged to deliver an inappropriate administrative structure, therefore, the Government formulated policies and plans to push public universities to be more autonomous. However, the shift towards greater autonomy has potential benefits and drawbacks. The primary objective of this research is to examine the impact of autonomy on the effectiveness of Thai universities using an institutional theory perspective. The study adopts a qualitative, interpretivist methodology using a case study approach. Three Thai universities with distinctive backgrounds and at different stages of adopting an autonomous form were identified and chosen. The data was collected through a series of extensive, face-to-face semi-structured interviews with key senior members of each of the three case universities. Information was also collected from the Government sources, public information and from internal organisational records. The research findings indicated that the influences of institutional pressures play a significant role in how each university adopts an autonomous model. While autonomy has brought benefits to the universities in terms of flexibility, it also has brought some challenges. The autonomous model has increased the level of complexity within the universities in terms of structure and administrative process. The level to which the university achieves the Government missions varies depending on how well it can adapt to the autonomous model. Two out of three case studies, are able to effectively adapt to the autonomous model, achieve the Government missions at higher level, while the other that is struggling to adapt, achieves at lower level. Historical root, identity and leadership are important variables in determining such different outcomes in the case studies. The analysis of the case studies suggests that the meaning of effectiveness is shaped by institutional factors and that universal forms of structure and governance in every university may not be appropriate. This research concludes that rather than a focus on developing a standard autonomous form, the emphasis should be on standardisation of outcomes while allowing some measure of flexibility in how autonomy is interpreted in the structure and processes of each university. Advisors/Committee Members: Barker, James R (advisor), Gilbert, John (advisor), Twiname, Linda J (advisor).
Page 1 Page 2

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Panitcharoen, P. (2017). The impact of autonomy on the effectiveness of universities in Thailand . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11303

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Panitcharoen, Pochara. “The impact of autonomy on the effectiveness of universities in Thailand .” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11303.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Panitcharoen, Pochara. “The impact of autonomy on the effectiveness of universities in Thailand .” 2017. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Panitcharoen P. The impact of autonomy on the effectiveness of universities in Thailand . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11303.

Council of Science Editors:

Panitcharoen P. The impact of autonomy on the effectiveness of universities in Thailand . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/11303

.