Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Waikato" +contributor:("Gibb, Jenny L"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Waikato

1. Allott, Joella. Creating Successful Partnerships in the People's Republic of China: The Significance of Guanxi Characteristics in the Relationship Building Process Between Cultural Entrepreneurs and Art Dealers.

Degree: 2016, University of Waikato

This research investigated the process of guanxi development in business partnerships between art dealers and artists in the Beijing art industry. The characteristics of guanxi were identified at each stage of the relationships’ development. They were then examined to identify which factors were the most influential. Finally, their effects on the business relationship were examined. Qualitative data was collected through in-depth interviews over two years in three of Beijing’s art districts. The transcribed and translated interviews were analysed using a grounded theory approach. This process was aided by qualitative software which enabled comparisons to be made between participants allowing theory to emerge. It was found that there were two markets in the art industry, one based on the giving of gifts to gain favours and the second on private market forces. The former, the painting gift culture, was found to be corrupt and often connected to bribing government officials. Within this environment galleries used guanxi networks to locate new supply and artists used them to locate art dealers. This reduced cost in time and money but did not always provide a competitive advantage if the product did not suit the market. Previous research has focussed primarily on the outcomes of guanxi as opposed to its development. To initiate business guanxi an intermediary was not necessary although it did facilitate the process. Of the three methods used to build guanxi, banqueting, gift giving and favours, it was found that banquets were most important at the first and second stages to initiate guanxi and build ganqing as the relationship evolved. It also played an important role in creating affective trust before cooperation began. Gift giving also increased ganqing at the second stage. Favours were most important after guanxi had consolidated and also contributed to an increase in ganqing. Having good guanxi did not lead to cognitive trust, but it was needed for cognitive trust to develop. This paradox led to formulating the Guanxi-Trust Model of Business Partnerships. Due to a disposition to distrust ganqing was developed which led to affective trust in order to kick start the relationship. The decision to cooperate was based on ability, perceived risks and mutual benefits. As cognitive trust developed it was compartmentalised into ability, moral character and mutual benefit which determined the willingness to cooperate. Throughout the process guanxi contributed to affective trust whereas successful cooperation led to cognitive. Cognitive trust also increased ganqing which improved the pair’s guanxi. Galleries that implemented the Guanxi-Trust Model were able to lock artists into long-term relationships due to successful cooperation and ganqing. The artists remained loyal to the galleries allowing them to create competitive pricing strategies which in turn provided sustainability over time. The findings provide empirical support for prior theoretical frameworks on guanxi development. Moreover, the development… Advisors/Committee Members: Akoorie, Michèle E.M (advisor), Gibb, Jenny L (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Guanxi; China; Relationship; Trust

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Allott, J. (2016). Creating Successful Partnerships in the People's Republic of China: The Significance of Guanxi Characteristics in the Relationship Building Process Between Cultural Entrepreneurs and Art Dealers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/9978

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Allott, Joella. “Creating Successful Partnerships in the People's Republic of China: The Significance of Guanxi Characteristics in the Relationship Building Process Between Cultural Entrepreneurs and Art Dealers. ” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/9978.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Allott, Joella. “Creating Successful Partnerships in the People's Republic of China: The Significance of Guanxi Characteristics in the Relationship Building Process Between Cultural Entrepreneurs and Art Dealers. ” 2016. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Allott J. Creating Successful Partnerships in the People's Republic of China: The Significance of Guanxi Characteristics in the Relationship Building Process Between Cultural Entrepreneurs and Art Dealers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/9978.

Council of Science Editors:

Allott J. Creating Successful Partnerships in the People's Republic of China: The Significance of Guanxi Characteristics in the Relationship Building Process Between Cultural Entrepreneurs and Art Dealers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/9978


University of Waikato

2. Sidek, Farhana. How Spirituality Shapes the Formation of Entrepreneurial Venture: The Case of Malay Muslim Entrepreneurs .

Degree: 2016, University of Waikato

Studies have shown that spirituality in the workplace can positively impact the performance of individuals, work units, and organisations. What once was thought to be just a short-lived trend has now grown into an established field of study. The establishment of the special interest group for Management, Spirituality, and Religion by the Academy of Management for instance shows that spirituality is more than just a passing fad. While research on spirituality and management continue to flourish, one particular area of study that has been given less attention to spirituality is entrepreneurship. Spirituality is less likely to be considered by the traditional entrepreneurship literature in driving the behaviours of entrepreneurs. Rather, the current literature has focused on wealth creation as the entrepreneur’s driving force. Hence, researchers have turned to various approaches such as economics, personality psychology, and strategy in attempt to understand the relationship between entrepreneurs and new venture creation, which have been less successful in dealing with the more micro question of ‘how’ and ‘why’. This warrants for new approaches that can explain the relationship between the entrepreneur and new venture formation, which spirituality can offer. The purpose of this study is to examine and understand the phenomenon of entrepreneurial venture creation from the perspective of Muslim entrepreneurs. As the second largest religion in the world, Islam is often subject to stereotyping and misunderstanding due to its approximately 1.6 billion followers globally with wide ranging levels of religious commitment and practice. The complexity of the relationship between religious values and cultural values further complicates the explanation of the behaviours of Muslim entrepreneurs. In addition to the sparsity of research on the diversity and forms of values and spirituality in organisations, most spirituality studies are currently based on the Western value systems; hence the need for non-western value systems based studies. The overarching research question for this study is: “How does spirituality shape the formation of entrepreneurial venture?”. Three sub-questions were developed to support this important research question, that are: 1) what are the key sources of entrepreneurial opportunity for Muslim entrepreneurs? 2) how do Muslim entrepreneurs understand entrepreneurial opportunity? 3) how are the Islamic spiritual values manifested in the Muslim entrepreneurs’ process of venture formation? Using an interpretive paradigm, qualitative research was conducted, whereby 15 entrepreneurs were interviewed using narrative interview questions. Stories on how these entrepreneurs started their ventures were analysed. Findings revealed that the Muslim entrepreneurs sourced their entrepreneurial opportunities from two types of gaps. While missing products or services in the market prompted the first type of gap, the second type of gap was due to the difference between the entrepreneurs’ expectations (that are guided by… Advisors/Committee Members: Pavlovich, Kathryn (advisor), Gibb, Jenny L (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Entrepreneurship; Spirituality

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sidek, F. (2016). How Spirituality Shapes the Formation of Entrepreneurial Venture: The Case of Malay Muslim Entrepreneurs . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/10825

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sidek, Farhana. “How Spirituality Shapes the Formation of Entrepreneurial Venture: The Case of Malay Muslim Entrepreneurs .” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/10825.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sidek, Farhana. “How Spirituality Shapes the Formation of Entrepreneurial Venture: The Case of Malay Muslim Entrepreneurs .” 2016. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Sidek F. How Spirituality Shapes the Formation of Entrepreneurial Venture: The Case of Malay Muslim Entrepreneurs . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/10825.

Council of Science Editors:

Sidek F. How Spirituality Shapes the Formation of Entrepreneurial Venture: The Case of Malay Muslim Entrepreneurs . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/10825


University of Waikato

3. Riley, Derek. Work and Family Interface: Wellbeing and the Role of Resilience and Work-Life Balance .

Degree: 2012, University of Waikato

Wellbeing research has recently gathered impetus largely due to the emergence of positive psychology. Researchers and practitioners are now exploring the science of positive subjective experiences, positive traits, positive states, aspects of human strengths and quality of life. Despite work and family deemed to be two of the most important domains of life, work and family wellbeing has received little attention in the positive psychology literature. Therefore, this thesis expands the landscape of the wellbeing literature by focusing on the work-family interface, the roles of resilience and work-life balance in achieving job and family satisfaction and psychological health. Specifically, my research sought to examine cross-sectional and longitudinally, the mediation effects of resilience and work-life balance between work-family conflict (time, strain and behaviour), work-family enrichment (development, affect and capital/efficiency) and a broad range of wellbeing outcomes (job satisfaction, family satisfaction, anxiety/depression, and social dysfunction) with health professionals. Health professionals in New Zealand are consistently exposed to psycho-social risk factors such as heavy workloads, irregular work schedules, and long hours of work. In addition, global demand for health professionals is at an all time high, with New Zealand-trained staff looking overseas for employment. The work-family literature is plentiful in studies exploring work-family conflict with a multitude of outcomes (e. g. job satisfaction, psychological and physical health, organisational commitment, turnover and turnover intentions). However, there are several gaps in the literature. Firstly, the work-family interface where little attention has been given to exploring a) the family to work directionality and the three forms of conflict (time-based, strain-based, and behaviour-based) is limited. In addition, a few studies have provided a holistic perspective in analysing the positive of the work-family interface in the form of (b) work-family enrichment (development, affect and capital/efficiency) and the impact on their experiences of life with health professionals in New Zealand. Furthermore, most studies that have utilized resilience have done so with adolescents in family settings with little emphasis placed on (c) exploring employee resilience in the workplace and its role towards wellbeing. Finally, the literature often fails to categorize and (d) test work-life balance as a subjective measure. Consequently, the present thesis examines all these issues. This research involved a two-wave panel design with a 10-12 month time-lag. Self reports on the eighteen latent variables were obtained from 1,598 health professionals at Time 1 and 296 at Time 2, employed by two District Health Boards (Waikato District Health Board and Lakes District Health Board) and one health provider (Toi Te Ora-Public Health) in New Zealand. SPSS was used to undertake the correlation analyses and structural equation modelling (SEM) to… Advisors/Committee Members: O’Driscoll, Michael P (advisor), Haar, Jarrod M (advisor), Gibb, Jenny L (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Resilience; Wellbeing; Work-Life Balance; Work and Family

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Riley, D. (2012). Work and Family Interface: Wellbeing and the Role of Resilience and Work-Life Balance . (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6563

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Riley, Derek. “Work and Family Interface: Wellbeing and the Role of Resilience and Work-Life Balance .” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Waikato. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6563.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Riley, Derek. “Work and Family Interface: Wellbeing and the Role of Resilience and Work-Life Balance .” 2012. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Riley D. Work and Family Interface: Wellbeing and the Role of Resilience and Work-Life Balance . [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2012. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6563.

Council of Science Editors:

Riley D. Work and Family Interface: Wellbeing and the Role of Resilience and Work-Life Balance . [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Waikato; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/6563

.