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You searched for +publisher:"University of Victoria" +contributor:("Wallace, Bruce"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Victoria

1. Power, Adam. Sheltered work to social enterprise: a case study of Haley Street Adult Services Centre Society.

Degree: School of Social Work, 2018, University of Victoria

Supportive work programs for people with disabilities have historically included sheltered workshops; while social enterprises are now more commonly found in policies and programs providing opportunities to address social, environmental, or economic challenges through revenue generating activities for this group. I began this thesis as a person who works at Haley Street Adult Services Centre Society in Nova Scotia, Canada and who is part of the changing provision from sheltered workshops to social enterprises. My primary research question is what is a non-profit, community-based organization working with people with disabilities, and a history of sheltered workshops, response to the current social enterprise movement? The study provides a case study analysis on Haley Street Adult Services Centre Society and its woodshop and thrift store programs for people with disabilities. The research includes interviews and focus groups with 19 participants (7 staff, 12 program participants) that work in the agency social enterprises as well as an organizational financial analysis. A thematic analysis of the interview and focus group transcripts resulted in the emergence of four themes that explore different aspects of social enterprises that support persons with people with disabilities. The themes included community engagement, demonstrating individual and agency capabilities, improved individual well-being, and agency social-economic tensions. Social enterprise at Haley Street is an integral part of its identity and emergence in the community. The profitability of social enterprise at Haley Street appears to be secondary to the social well-being and engagement of participants. The current research found that sheltered work and social enterprises are comparable entities, with sheltered work a subgroup of social enterprise. Advisors/Committee Members: Wallace, Bruce (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Social Enterprise; Sheltered Work; Disabilities; Case Study

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APA (6th Edition):

Power, A. (2018). Sheltered work to social enterprise: a case study of Haley Street Adult Services Centre Society. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10056

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Power, Adam. “Sheltered work to social enterprise: a case study of Haley Street Adult Services Centre Society.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10056.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Power, Adam. “Sheltered work to social enterprise: a case study of Haley Street Adult Services Centre Society.” 2018. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Power A. Sheltered work to social enterprise: a case study of Haley Street Adult Services Centre Society. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10056.

Council of Science Editors:

Power A. Sheltered work to social enterprise: a case study of Haley Street Adult Services Centre Society. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10056


University of Victoria

2. Hastings, Sarah. HIV/AIDS and HCV risk factors related to homelessness: Are front line workers equipped with knowledge to best support shelter clients?.

Degree: Program: Social Dimensions of Health, 2018, University of Victoria

Background Shelter employees of the Victoria Cool Aid Society (VCAS) work with clients living with or at risk of contracting, the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and the Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). The purpose of this thesis is to assess whether the VCAS shelter staff need further HIV/AIDS and HCV education to support shelter clients. Methods A two-part (A and B) survey consisting of 70 questions asked 38 Emergency Support Workers to: A) rate their ability (expertise) to answer HIV/AIDS and HCV related questions, and B) identify which questions contain important knowledge to know for their work. Staff were recruited via Posters on bulletin boards around shelters sites as well as an email, and two follow up emails, informing staff about the survey. The survey explored the following subjects: 1) HIV/AIDS (12 questions), 2) Hep C (11 questions), 3) Health and Substance Use (3 questions), 4) Protocol (3 questions), and 5) Community Agencies (6 questions). From this format, it was possible to assess where staff felt their knowledge levels could use improvement (low and medium knowledge levels) and what topics they felt important to know for their work (high importance to know). These two parts of the survey, together, were then used to determine questions to include in a future training course i.e. questions were staff reported low or medium knowledge levels and high importance to know. Results Results for each of the five sections showing both lower levels of knowledge (expertise) and higher knowledge importance, were as follows: 1) HIV/AIDS: 8 out of 12 questions, 2) HCV: 10 out of 11 questions, 3) Health and Substance Use: 1 out of 3 questions, 4) Protocol: 3 out of 3 questions, and 5) Community Agencies: 3 out of 6 questions. Survey results were delivered via Power Point presentation to management of the Victoria Cool Aid Society using simple graphs and charts to describe easily the findings to stakeholders. The presentation emphasised that staff overall are in need of specific HIV/AIDS and HCV education. Conclusion Emergency shelter workers are in need of HIV/AIDS and HCV education. The results can inform a HIV/AIDS and HCV educational course for VCAS shelter staff. Advisors/Committee Members: Roth, Eric Abella (supervisor), Wallace, Bruce (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: HIV; AIDS; HCV; homelessness; shelter workers

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hastings, S. (2018). HIV/AIDS and HCV risk factors related to homelessness: Are front line workers equipped with knowledge to best support shelter clients?. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9923

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hastings, Sarah. “HIV/AIDS and HCV risk factors related to homelessness: Are front line workers equipped with knowledge to best support shelter clients?.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed October 14, 2019. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9923.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hastings, Sarah. “HIV/AIDS and HCV risk factors related to homelessness: Are front line workers equipped with knowledge to best support shelter clients?.” 2018. Web. 14 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hastings S. HIV/AIDS and HCV risk factors related to homelessness: Are front line workers equipped with knowledge to best support shelter clients?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 14]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9923.

Council of Science Editors:

Hastings S. HIV/AIDS and HCV risk factors related to homelessness: Are front line workers equipped with knowledge to best support shelter clients?. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9923

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