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You searched for +publisher:"University of Victoria" +contributor:("Timmons, Beverly A."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Victoria

1. Goldsmith, Susan Marie. Test expectancies and memory organization.

Degree: Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies, 2018, University of Victoria

The relationship between memory organization skills and performance was investigated. The purpose was to investigate organization and training differences that might result in different performance under the recall TES effect. The recall test expectancy effect (TES) states that people who expect and receive a recall test perform significantly better than do people who expect a multiple choice test but receive a recall test (Balota & Neely, 1980). In Phase 1, half of the 96 female undergraduate participants were randomly assigned to a categorized word list while the other half were assigned to an unrelated word list (Tulving, 1962) condition. The subjects studied and recalled the same list of words over four study-test trials. The participants were divided into high and low organizer groups depending on their organization scores (Tulving & Sternberg, 1977) from Phase 1. Before Phase 2 the high and low organizer groups were randomly assigned to either a training or no training condition. The subjects in the no training condition went directly to Phase 2. The training period consisted of suggestions for organizing materials for better recall. In Phase 2 all of the subjects received three different word lists for each of three study-test trials. The first two tests were multiple choice (recognition) and the last was a surprise recall test. Thus, the subjects were led to expect a recognition test through practice. The results from all of the condition groups were in support of the traditional recall TES effect. This reflected qualitatively different processes used for recognition versus recall tests (Underwood, 1972). There was a significant relationship between organizational abilities from Phase 1 and performance on the surprise recall test in Phase 2 for the high organizers but not for the low organizers. Significant group differences were found when training was not provided; however, the training period eliminated organizational group differences in Phase 2. The results were interpreted within the theoretical frameworks of Anderson and Bower (1972, 1974) and Gillund and Shiffrin (1984). Future research should be aimed at identifying the practical organization strategies used by test-takers so that recall performance of students, especially low organizers, can be facilitated. Advisors/Committee Members: Timmons, Beverly A. (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Educational psychology; Memory; Recollection (Psychology); Examinations; Multiple-choice examinations

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Goldsmith, S. M. (2018). Test expectancies and memory organization. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9454

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Goldsmith, Susan Marie. “Test expectancies and memory organization.” 2018. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 21, 2020. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9454.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Goldsmith, Susan Marie. “Test expectancies and memory organization.” 2018. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Goldsmith SM. Test expectancies and memory organization. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9454.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Goldsmith SM. Test expectancies and memory organization. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9454

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Victoria

2. Banister, Elizabeth M. Midlife women's perceptions of their changing bodies: an ethnographic analysis.

Degree: Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies, 2018, University of Victoria

The purpose of this study was to document, from a developmental perspective, midlife women's perceptions of their changing bodies within the larger cultural context, and to use ethnographic research as a tool for researching midlife women. The central question guiding the analysis of midlife women's lives was: What are midlife women's perceptions of their changing bodies? The self-reported experiences of 11 midlife women (ages 40–55) were obtained and the data analyzed using Spradley's (1979) Developmental Research Sequence Method. Data were collected by using individual and group interviews. During the individual interviews, three kinds of ethnographic questions (descriptive, structural, and contrast) were used to explore how each woman conceptualized her experiences. After the individual interviews were completed, three consecutive group interviews were conducted. The group interviews provided a context for determining the women's shared meaning of their changing bodies at this pivotal time of their development. To solidify the credibility of this qualitative study, the understandings derived from the study were subjected to member checking and the application of content analysis. Four general themes emerged from the analysis of the data. The first two themes—the media and medicine—involved aspects of the culture that most influenced the women's interpretations of their changing bodies and were, therefore, structural in nature. The second two themes—loss, and redefining of self (including the development of self-care)—involved the more personal aspects of the women's narratives such as reflected meanings and attitudes. Results of the study indicated that the midlife period in a woman's life encompasses a broad spectrum of experience, full of contradiction and change. Issues of loss, change in role functions, cultural influences that perpetuate ageism and sexism, ambivalence, strong emotional responses, lack of consistent information about menopause and sexuality, questioning, critical reflection, coping mechanisms, redefining self self-care—all played a central role in the women's lives during this important time of transition. Midlife events prompted the participants to question and challenge traditional cultural expectations about female roles and behavior; and in this way they reinterpreted their experiences and created new meaning from them. The women reformulated their self-definitions from that of caregiver to care receiver, from caring for others to caring more for oneself. This could be seen as a major developmental change in the women's lives, since through this process of facing the challenges of midlife, the women moved from self definitions that were based on negative cultural stereotypes to self definitions that were based on an affirmation of their ability to experience the events of their existence as autonomous individuals, less bound by stereotypes than they had been before. Health professionals can attempt to examine some of their own biases and assumptions about midlife women that… Advisors/Committee Members: Timmons, Beverly A. (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Middle-aged women; Middle age; Psychological aspects; Women; Psychology; Attitudes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Banister, E. M. (2018). Midlife women's perceptions of their changing bodies: an ethnographic analysis. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9802

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Banister, Elizabeth M. “Midlife women's perceptions of their changing bodies: an ethnographic analysis.” 2018. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 21, 2020. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9802.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Banister, Elizabeth M. “Midlife women's perceptions of their changing bodies: an ethnographic analysis.” 2018. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Banister EM. Midlife women's perceptions of their changing bodies: an ethnographic analysis. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9802.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Banister EM. Midlife women's perceptions of their changing bodies: an ethnographic analysis. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9802

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Victoria

3. Van Domselaar, Theresa Anne. Offenders' social-cognitive skills as predictors of criminality and recidivism.

Degree: Department of Educational Psychology and Leadership Studies, 2017, University of Victoria

The Social Cognitive Screening Battery (SCSB; Ross & Fabiano, 1985; Ross & Ross, 1995) and three statistical control measures (estimates of educational attainment, intelligence and depression) were assessed for their ability to distinguish between participants incarcerated in a provincial correctional institution and community members with no history of incarceration. These same measures also were tested to determine whether incarcerated participants' degree of recidivism could be predicted. The sample consisted of 29 participants, 19 of whom were incarcerated and 10 were non-incarcerated. The sample was comprised of both males (n = 20) and females (n = 9) and of people of Aboriginal (n = 5) and Caucasian (n = 24) descent. Two of the SCSB instruments (Conceptual Level Paragraph Completion Method; Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal) significantly contributed to the prediction of group membership over and above that of the three control variables, which were also significantly predictive of group membership. Two other SCSB variables (Locus of Control; Rigidity) closely approached statistically significant contribution to prediction. None of the variables were significantly correlated with incarcerated participant's level of recidivism as measured by number of contacts with the criminal justice system. Implications of the results with regard to improved identification of offenders amenable to treatment using the Reasoning and Rehabilitation Program (Ross & Fabiano, 1985; Ross & Ross, 1995) are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Timmons, Beverly A. (supervisor), Harvey, Brian (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Recidivism; Criminal behavior

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Van Domselaar, T. A. (2017). Offenders' social-cognitive skills as predictors of criminality and recidivism. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8818

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Van Domselaar, Theresa Anne. “Offenders' social-cognitive skills as predictors of criminality and recidivism.” 2017. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 21, 2020. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8818.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Van Domselaar, Theresa Anne. “Offenders' social-cognitive skills as predictors of criminality and recidivism.” 2017. Web. 21 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Van Domselaar TA. Offenders' social-cognitive skills as predictors of criminality and recidivism. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 21]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8818.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Van Domselaar TA. Offenders' social-cognitive skills as predictors of criminality and recidivism. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2017. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8818

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.