Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Victoria" +contributor:("Tanaka, James William"). Showing records 1 – 8 of 8 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Victoria

1. Gordon, Iris. Names and faces: the role of name labels in the formation of face representations.

Degree: Dept. of Psychology, 2011, University of Victoria

 Although previous research in event-related potentials (ERPs) has focused on the conditions under which faces are recognized, less research has focused on the process by… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: face recognition

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gordon, I. (2011). Names and faces: the role of name labels in the formation of face representations. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3334

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gordon, Iris. “Names and faces: the role of name labels in the formation of face representations.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3334.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gordon, Iris. “Names and faces: the role of name labels in the formation of face representations.” 2011. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Gordon I. Names and faces: the role of name labels in the formation of face representations. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3334.

Council of Science Editors:

Gordon I. Names and faces: the role of name labels in the formation of face representations. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3334


University of Victoria

2. Hagen, Simen. The influence of real-world object expertise on visual discrimination mechanisms.

Degree: Department of Psychology, 2018, University of Victoria

 Object experts quickly and accurately discriminate objects within their domain of expertise. Although expert recognition has been extensively studied both at the behavioral- and neural-levels… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Expert object recognition; Perceptual learning

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hagen, S. (2018). The influence of real-world object expertise on visual discrimination mechanisms. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8942

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hagen, Simen. “The influence of real-world object expertise on visual discrimination mechanisms.” 2018. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 20, 2020. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8942.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hagen, Simen. “The influence of real-world object expertise on visual discrimination mechanisms.” 2018. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Hagen S. The influence of real-world object expertise on visual discrimination mechanisms. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8942.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hagen S. The influence of real-world object expertise on visual discrimination mechanisms. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8942

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Victoria

3. Friesen, Krista B. Electrophysiological correlates of correct and incorrect eyewitness identification: the role of the N250 and P300 in real-world face recognition.

Degree: Dept. of Psychology, 2011, University of Victoria

 This set of studies used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the electrophysiology of face recognition as it may occur in real-life circumstances including eyewitness identification.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: eyewitness memory; event-related potentials; UVic Subject Index::Sciences and Engineering::Psychology::Cognitive psychology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Friesen, K. B. (2011). Electrophysiological correlates of correct and incorrect eyewitness identification: the role of the N250 and P300 in real-world face recognition. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3206

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Friesen, Krista B. “Electrophysiological correlates of correct and incorrect eyewitness identification: the role of the N250 and P300 in real-world face recognition.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3206.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Friesen, Krista B. “Electrophysiological correlates of correct and incorrect eyewitness identification: the role of the N250 and P300 in real-world face recognition.” 2011. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Friesen KB. Electrophysiological correlates of correct and incorrect eyewitness identification: the role of the N250 and P300 in real-world face recognition. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2011. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3206.

Council of Science Editors:

Friesen KB. Electrophysiological correlates of correct and incorrect eyewitness identification: the role of the N250 and P300 in real-world face recognition. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3206


University of Victoria

4. Jacoby, James Derek. Event-related potentials as a form of neurofeedback using low-cost hardware.

Degree: Department of Computer Science, 2016, University of Victoria

 The studies reported in this dissertation demonstrate that low-cost hardware is capable of detecting neural responses to stimuli in the user’s focus of attention, and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: EEG neurofeedback ERP P300

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jacoby, J. D. (2016). Event-related potentials as a form of neurofeedback using low-cost hardware. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/7510

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jacoby, James Derek. “Event-related potentials as a form of neurofeedback using low-cost hardware.” 2016. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/7510.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jacoby, James Derek. “Event-related potentials as a form of neurofeedback using low-cost hardware.” 2016. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Jacoby JD. Event-related potentials as a form of neurofeedback using low-cost hardware. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2016. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/7510.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jacoby JD. Event-related potentials as a form of neurofeedback using low-cost hardware. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/7510

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

5. Xu, Buyun. The Temporal Dynamics of Social Cue Processing.

Degree: Dept. of Psychology, 2013, University of Victoria

 Social cues, such as eye gaze and head-turns, can orient attention automatically. Social cue processing includes three sequential stages, namely cue selection, cue following and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Social Cue; Peripheral Onset Effect; Temporal Dynamics; Attention Orientation; ASD

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Xu, B. (2013). The Temporal Dynamics of Social Cue Processing. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4814

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Xu, Buyun. “The Temporal Dynamics of Social Cue Processing.” 2013. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4814.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Xu, Buyun. “The Temporal Dynamics of Social Cue Processing.” 2013. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Xu B. The Temporal Dynamics of Social Cue Processing. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2013. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4814.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Xu B. The Temporal Dynamics of Social Cue Processing. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4814

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

6. Campbell, Alison. Using cluster analysis to quantify systematicity in a face image sorting task.

Degree: Department of Psychology, 2017, University of Victoria

 Open sorting tasks that include multiple face images of the same person require participants to make identity judgments in order to group images of the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cluster analysis; Face; Face perception; Image analysis

…the University of Victoria participated for course credit (14 female, mean age = 20.4… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Campbell, A. (2017). Using cluster analysis to quantify systematicity in a face image sorting task. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8493

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Campbell, Alison. “Using cluster analysis to quantify systematicity in a face image sorting task.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 20, 2020. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8493.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Campbell, Alison. “Using cluster analysis to quantify systematicity in a face image sorting task.” 2017. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Campbell A. Using cluster analysis to quantify systematicity in a face image sorting task. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2017. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8493.

Council of Science Editors:

Campbell A. Using cluster analysis to quantify systematicity in a face image sorting task. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2017. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/8493

7. Gordon, Iris. FaceMaze: An Embodied Cognition Approach To Facial Expression Production in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Degree: Department of Psychology, 2014, University of Victoria

 Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) are typified by deficits in social communication, including flat and disorganized affect. Previous research investigating affect production in ASD… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Autism Intervention; Facial Expressions; Expression Production; Embodied Cognition

…Participants Thirty-six undergraduate students from the University of Victoria participated in this… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gordon, I. (2014). FaceMaze: An Embodied Cognition Approach To Facial Expression Production in Autism Spectrum Disorder. (Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5599

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gordon, Iris. “FaceMaze: An Embodied Cognition Approach To Facial Expression Production in Autism Spectrum Disorder.” 2014. Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5599.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gordon, Iris. “FaceMaze: An Embodied Cognition Approach To Facial Expression Production in Autism Spectrum Disorder.” 2014. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Gordon I. FaceMaze: An Embodied Cognition Approach To Facial Expression Production in Autism Spectrum Disorder. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2014. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5599.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gordon I. FaceMaze: An Embodied Cognition Approach To Facial Expression Production in Autism Spectrum Disorder. [Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5599

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Victoria

8. Piatt, Carley Graceanna. Object perception: separating the contributions of high and low level visual processes with event related brain potentials.

Degree: Dept. of Psychology, 2009, University of Victoria

 Object recognition was studied by combining a continuous presentation paradigm and event related potentials (ERPs). Using the Random Image Structure Evolution program (RISE), the phase… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: visual perception; UVic Subject Index::Humanities and Social Sciences::Psychology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Piatt, C. G. (2009). Object perception: separating the contributions of high and low level visual processes with event related brain potentials. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/1995

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Piatt, Carley Graceanna. “Object perception: separating the contributions of high and low level visual processes with event related brain potentials.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed January 20, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/1995.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Piatt, Carley Graceanna. “Object perception: separating the contributions of high and low level visual processes with event related brain potentials.” 2009. Web. 20 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Piatt CG. Object perception: separating the contributions of high and low level visual processes with event related brain potentials. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2009. [cited 2020 Jan 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/1995.

Council of Science Editors:

Piatt CG. Object perception: separating the contributions of high and low level visual processes with event related brain potentials. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/1995

.