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You searched for +publisher:"University of Victoria" +contributor:("Lantz, Trevor Charles"). Showing records 1 – 10 of 10 total matches.

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University of Victoria

1. Martin, Abra Frances. Carbon fluxes from high-centred polygonal terrain in the Northwest Territories.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2015, University of Victoria

 Northern regions account for approximately 30% (1035 Pg) of the world’s soil organic carbon (SOC). Much of this carbon is currently stored in permafrost soils,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: carbon dioxide; methane; permafrost; thermokarst

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APA (6th Edition):

Martin, A. F. (2015). Carbon fluxes from high-centred polygonal terrain in the Northwest Territories. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6985

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Martin, Abra Frances. “Carbon fluxes from high-centred polygonal terrain in the Northwest Territories.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6985.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Martin, Abra Frances. “Carbon fluxes from high-centred polygonal terrain in the Northwest Territories.” 2015. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Martin AF. Carbon fluxes from high-centred polygonal terrain in the Northwest Territories. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6985.

Council of Science Editors:

Martin AF. Carbon fluxes from high-centred polygonal terrain in the Northwest Territories. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6985


University of Victoria

2. Tyson, William. Assessing the Cumulative Effects of Environmental Change on Wildlife Harvesting Areas in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region through Spatial Analysis and Community-based Research.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2015, University of Victoria

 Arctic ecosystems are undergoing rapid environmental transformations. Climate change is affecting permafrost temperature, vegetation structure, and wildlife populations, and increasing human development is impacting a… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Inuvialuit Settlement Region (ISR); Spatial Analysis; Marxan; Indigenous Knowledge; Wildlife; Subsistence Harvesting; Arctic

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APA (6th Edition):

Tyson, W. (2015). Assessing the Cumulative Effects of Environmental Change on Wildlife Harvesting Areas in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region through Spatial Analysis and Community-based Research. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6927

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tyson, William. “Assessing the Cumulative Effects of Environmental Change on Wildlife Harvesting Areas in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region through Spatial Analysis and Community-based Research.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6927.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tyson, William. “Assessing the Cumulative Effects of Environmental Change on Wildlife Harvesting Areas in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region through Spatial Analysis and Community-based Research.” 2015. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Tyson W. Assessing the Cumulative Effects of Environmental Change on Wildlife Harvesting Areas in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region through Spatial Analysis and Community-based Research. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6927.

Council of Science Editors:

Tyson W. Assessing the Cumulative Effects of Environmental Change on Wildlife Harvesting Areas in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region through Spatial Analysis and Community-based Research. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6927


University of Victoria

3. Gill, Harneet Kaur. Environmental changes in the lower Peel River watershed, Northwest Territories, Canada: Scientific and Gwich'in perpectives.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2013, University of Victoria

 The circumpolar Arctic is experiencing dramatic environmental changes that are already impacting tundra ecosystems and northern communities that are intimately linked to the land. Increasing… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: ecosystems; permafrost; alder; Peel Plateau

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APA (6th Edition):

Gill, H. K. (2013). Environmental changes in the lower Peel River watershed, Northwest Territories, Canada: Scientific and Gwich'in perpectives. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5105

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gill, Harneet Kaur. “Environmental changes in the lower Peel River watershed, Northwest Territories, Canada: Scientific and Gwich'in perpectives.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5105.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gill, Harneet Kaur. “Environmental changes in the lower Peel River watershed, Northwest Territories, Canada: Scientific and Gwich'in perpectives.” 2013. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Gill HK. Environmental changes in the lower Peel River watershed, Northwest Territories, Canada: Scientific and Gwich'in perpectives. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2013. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5105.

Council of Science Editors:

Gill HK. Environmental changes in the lower Peel River watershed, Northwest Territories, Canada: Scientific and Gwich'in perpectives. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5105


University of Victoria

4. Cameron, Emily A. Ecological impacts of roads in Canada's north.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2015, University of Victoria

 Arctic ecosystems are experiencing rapid changes as a result of climate warming and more frequent natural and human-caused disturbances. Disturbances can have particularly large effects… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Arctic; Vegetation; Disturbance; Permafrost; Shrub; Roads

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APA (6th Edition):

Cameron, E. A. (2015). Ecological impacts of roads in Canada's north. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6764

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cameron, Emily A. “Ecological impacts of roads in Canada's north.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6764.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cameron, Emily A. “Ecological impacts of roads in Canada's north.” 2015. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Cameron EA. Ecological impacts of roads in Canada's north. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6764.

Council of Science Editors:

Cameron EA. Ecological impacts of roads in Canada's north. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/6764


University of Victoria

5. Steedman, Audrey Elizabeth. The ecology and dynamics of ice wedge degradation in high-centre polygonal terrain in the uplands of the Mackenzie Delta region, Northwest Territories.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2014, University of Victoria

 Climate warming has the potential to alter the structure and function of Arctic ecosystems in ways that are not fully understood. Polygonal terrain is a… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Mackenzie Delta; ice wedge polygons; permafrost degradation; remote sensing; plant community composition; peatlands

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APA (6th Edition):

Steedman, A. E. (2014). The ecology and dynamics of ice wedge degradation in high-centre polygonal terrain in the uplands of the Mackenzie Delta region, Northwest Territories. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5818

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Steedman, Audrey Elizabeth. “The ecology and dynamics of ice wedge degradation in high-centre polygonal terrain in the uplands of the Mackenzie Delta region, Northwest Territories.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5818.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Steedman, Audrey Elizabeth. “The ecology and dynamics of ice wedge degradation in high-centre polygonal terrain in the uplands of the Mackenzie Delta region, Northwest Territories.” 2014. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Steedman AE. The ecology and dynamics of ice wedge degradation in high-centre polygonal terrain in the uplands of the Mackenzie Delta region, Northwest Territories. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2014. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5818.

Council of Science Editors:

Steedman AE. The ecology and dynamics of ice wedge degradation in high-centre polygonal terrain in the uplands of the Mackenzie Delta region, Northwest Territories. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/5818


University of Victoria

6. Turner, Chanda Kalene. Springtime in the Delta: the sociocultural role of muskrats and drivers of their distribution in a changing Arctic delta.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2018, University of Victoria

 Climate change is altering environmental conditions in Canada’s western arctic, including hydrology, permafrost, vegetation, and lake habitat conditions in the heterogeneous landscape of the Mackenzie… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Arctic; Muskrat; subsistence harvesting; traditional knowledge; local knowledge; Inuvialuit; Gwich'in; Indigenous Peoples; landscape ecology; ecology; delta; heterogeneity; climate change; sociocultural

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APA (6th Edition):

Turner, C. K. (2018). Springtime in the Delta: the sociocultural role of muskrats and drivers of their distribution in a changing Arctic delta. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9314

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Turner, Chanda Kalene. “Springtime in the Delta: the sociocultural role of muskrats and drivers of their distribution in a changing Arctic delta.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9314.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Turner, Chanda Kalene. “Springtime in the Delta: the sociocultural role of muskrats and drivers of their distribution in a changing Arctic delta.” 2018. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Turner CK. Springtime in the Delta: the sociocultural role of muskrats and drivers of their distribution in a changing Arctic delta. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9314.

Council of Science Editors:

Turner CK. Springtime in the Delta: the sociocultural role of muskrats and drivers of their distribution in a changing Arctic delta. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2018. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/9314


University of Victoria

7. Campbell, Thomas Kiyoshi Fujiwara. Impacts of climate change and intensive lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) activity in high Arctic pond complexes - Banks Island, Northwest Territories.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2019, University of Victoria

 Rapid increases in air temperature in Arctic and subarctic regions are driving significant changes to surface water. These changes and their impacts are not well… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Arctic; High Arctic; Tundra ponds; Wetlands; Desiccation; Climate change; Protected areas; Global change

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APA (6th Edition):

Campbell, T. K. F. (2019). Impacts of climate change and intensive lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) activity in high Arctic pond complexes - Banks Island, Northwest Territories. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10588

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Campbell, Thomas Kiyoshi Fujiwara. “Impacts of climate change and intensive lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) activity in high Arctic pond complexes - Banks Island, Northwest Territories.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10588.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Campbell, Thomas Kiyoshi Fujiwara. “Impacts of climate change and intensive lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) activity in high Arctic pond complexes - Banks Island, Northwest Territories.” 2019. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Campbell TKF. Impacts of climate change and intensive lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) activity in high Arctic pond complexes - Banks Island, Northwest Territories. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10588.

Council of Science Editors:

Campbell TKF. Impacts of climate change and intensive lesser snow goose (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) activity in high Arctic pond complexes - Banks Island, Northwest Territories. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2019. Available from: https://dspace.library.uvic.ca//handle/1828/10588


University of Victoria

8. Proverbs, Tracey Angela. Social-ecological change in Gwich’in territory: cumulative impacts in the cultural landscape, and determinants of access to fish.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2019, University of Victoria

 In the territory of the Gwich’in First Nation, in Canada’s Northwest Territories, environmental, sociocultural, and economic changes are affecting relationships between communities and the land… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Gwich'in; well-being; access; fish (food); Canadian subarctic; Indigenous; social-ecological change; cumulative impacts; cultural landscapes; cultural features; spatial overlay

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APA (6th Edition):

Proverbs, T. A. (2019). Social-ecological change in Gwich’in territory: cumulative impacts in the cultural landscape, and determinants of access to fish. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/11086

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Proverbs, Tracey Angela. “Social-ecological change in Gwich’in territory: cumulative impacts in the cultural landscape, and determinants of access to fish.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/11086.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Proverbs, Tracey Angela. “Social-ecological change in Gwich’in territory: cumulative impacts in the cultural landscape, and determinants of access to fish.” 2019. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Proverbs TA. Social-ecological change in Gwich’in territory: cumulative impacts in the cultural landscape, and determinants of access to fish. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/11086.

Council of Science Editors:

Proverbs TA. Social-ecological change in Gwich’in territory: cumulative impacts in the cultural landscape, and determinants of access to fish. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/11086

9. Bennett, Trevor Dixon. Monitoring environmental conditions using participatory photo-mapping with Inuvialuit knowledge holders in the Mackenzie Delta Region, Northwest Territories.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2012, University of Victoria

 The Mackenzie Delta region of Northwestern Canada is a dynamic environment that is ecologically and culturally significant. This region is experiencing rapid environmental change that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Arctic; traditional ecological knowledge; Inuvialuit observations; web-based mapping; environmental monitoring; environmental change; visual research methods; participatory research methods

…Dairyland Environmental Scholarships, and a University of Victoria Graduate Student Award. I would… …support and assistance at every turn of this research. At the University of Victoria, Ken… 

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APA (6th Edition):

Bennett, T. D. (2012). Monitoring environmental conditions using participatory photo-mapping with Inuvialuit knowledge holders in the Mackenzie Delta Region, Northwest Territories. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3994

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bennett, Trevor Dixon. “Monitoring environmental conditions using participatory photo-mapping with Inuvialuit knowledge holders in the Mackenzie Delta Region, Northwest Territories.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3994.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bennett, Trevor Dixon. “Monitoring environmental conditions using participatory photo-mapping with Inuvialuit knowledge holders in the Mackenzie Delta Region, Northwest Territories.” 2012. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Bennett TD. Monitoring environmental conditions using participatory photo-mapping with Inuvialuit knowledge holders in the Mackenzie Delta Region, Northwest Territories. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3994.

Council of Science Editors:

Bennett TD. Monitoring environmental conditions using participatory photo-mapping with Inuvialuit knowledge holders in the Mackenzie Delta Region, Northwest Territories. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3994


University of Victoria

10. Joseph, Leigh. Finding our roots: ethnoecological restoration of lhasem (Fritillaria camschatcensis (L.) Ker-Gawl), an iconic plant food in the Squamish River Estuary, British Columbia.

Degree: School of Environmental Studies, 2012, University of Victoria

 Fritillaria camschatcensis L. Ker Gawl (Liliaceae), is a herbaceous flowering plant that grows in estuarine and subalpine habitats within its range from the northern limit… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Ethnobotany; Ethnoecological Restoration; Squamish First Nations; Botany; Estuary Root Gardens

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APA (6th Edition):

Joseph, L. (2012). Finding our roots: ethnoecological restoration of lhasem (Fritillaria camschatcensis (L.) Ker-Gawl), an iconic plant food in the Squamish River Estuary, British Columbia. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4190

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Joseph, Leigh. “Finding our roots: ethnoecological restoration of lhasem (Fritillaria camschatcensis (L.) Ker-Gawl), an iconic plant food in the Squamish River Estuary, British Columbia.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed December 08, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4190.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Joseph, Leigh. “Finding our roots: ethnoecological restoration of lhasem (Fritillaria camschatcensis (L.) Ker-Gawl), an iconic plant food in the Squamish River Estuary, British Columbia.” 2012. Web. 08 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Joseph L. Finding our roots: ethnoecological restoration of lhasem (Fritillaria camschatcensis (L.) Ker-Gawl), an iconic plant food in the Squamish River Estuary, British Columbia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. [cited 2019 Dec 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4190.

Council of Science Editors:

Joseph L. Finding our roots: ethnoecological restoration of lhasem (Fritillaria camschatcensis (L.) Ker-Gawl), an iconic plant food in the Squamish River Estuary, British Columbia. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/4190

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