Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · date | New search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Victoria" +contributor:("Hammond, Mitchell Love"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Victoria

1. Hough, Adam. Musically expressed theology, and the golden age of Martin Luther's Reformation.

Degree: Dept. of History, 2011, University of Victoria

This thesis seeks a reappraisal of Martin Luther’s complex understanding of theology’s place in the social and political reformation of sixteenth century Germany. Here I seek to reintroduce an element of that theology that has been largely absent from mainstream scholarship: music. Building on Robin Leaver’s influential 2007 work, Luther’s Liturgical music, wherein he argues that Luther’s liturgical song-writing ought to be understood theologically, I will demonstrate how the reformer sought to use a musically expressed theology to build a foundation of faith among the German laity- a prerequisite, he believed, to a successful reformation of Christian religion and society. I will place the genesis of this idea both in Luther’s participation in the Indulgence Controversy, and in the failed ‘Leisnig Experiment’, in which he promoted the adoption of a congregationalist model of spiritual self-regulation. Luther’s answer to the failures of Leisnig was an educational program centered on teaching a theology of the Psalms through music. In his teachings, we will see that Luther saw theology as not only a path to salvation, but as a practical remedy to broader social problems arising from greed and false teaching. This discussion will conclude with an explanation of why this educational program of teaching theology through music did not feature prominently in Lutheran pedagogy once the process of confessionalization was begun in the late 1520’s. Advisors/Committee Members: Hammond, Mitchell Love (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Martin Luther; Lutheranism; Reformation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hough, A. (2011). Musically expressed theology, and the golden age of Martin Luther's Reformation. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3485

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hough, Adam. “Musically expressed theology, and the golden age of Martin Luther's Reformation.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed June 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3485.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hough, Adam. “Musically expressed theology, and the golden age of Martin Luther's Reformation.” 2011. Web. 05 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Hough A. Musically expressed theology, and the golden age of Martin Luther's Reformation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2011. [cited 2020 Jun 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3485.

Council of Science Editors:

Hough A. Musically expressed theology, and the golden age of Martin Luther's Reformation. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/3485


University of Victoria

2. Dove, Stephen. The reconstruction of pharmacist authority in British Columbia, 1965-1968.

Degree: Dept. of History, 2010, University of Victoria

Despite extensive research on the history of medicine, little has been written on the role played by pharmacists. The diminished demand for compounding services that accompanied the explosion of manufactured pharmaceuticals after World War II left pharmacists over educated and underutilized. This study demonstrates how British Columbia pharmacists reconstructed their professional authority in the 1960s through the formation of a Pharmacy Planning Commission, a process that pre-dated and influenced other jurisdictions. Examination of the archives of the College of Pharmacists of British Columbia reveals that pharmacists overcame ethical restrictions, adopted clinically focussed education and increased accessibility to facilitate a role as consultant to the public on non-prescription medications. The addition of prescription drug counselling and an increased role as drug consultants to physicians allowed British Columbia pharmacists the authority to claim a core competency as drug information experts. Advisors/Committee Members: Hammond, Mitchell Love (supervisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Pharmacy; Pharmacist; Professionalization; ethics; medical; authority; UVic Subject Index::Humanities and Social Sciences::History::Canada – History; UVic Subject Index::Sciences and Engineering::Health Sciences::Pharmacology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dove, S. (2010). The reconstruction of pharmacist authority in British Columbia, 1965-1968. (Masters Thesis). University of Victoria. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1828/2954

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dove, Stephen. “The reconstruction of pharmacist authority in British Columbia, 1965-1968.” 2010. Masters Thesis, University of Victoria. Accessed June 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1828/2954.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dove, Stephen. “The reconstruction of pharmacist authority in British Columbia, 1965-1968.” 2010. Web. 05 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Dove S. The reconstruction of pharmacist authority in British Columbia, 1965-1968. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Victoria; 2010. [cited 2020 Jun 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/2954.

Council of Science Editors:

Dove S. The reconstruction of pharmacist authority in British Columbia, 1965-1968. [Masters Thesis]. University of Victoria; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1828/2954

.