Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Vermont" +contributor:("Andrew Buchanan"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Vermont

1. Grove, Angela Nicole. Thomas Johnson: Gentleman, Vermonter, Patriot.

Degree: MA, History, 2015, University of Vermont

This thesis is a micro-history of the formation of the various identities that shaped the Revolutionary War experiences of one eighteenth-century Vermonter (Thomas Johnson) whose life is documented in a manuscript collection at the Vermont Historical Society. I break down Johnson's identities into three levels: social class, state, and national. My argument is that what it meant to be a provincial gentleman, to be a Vermonter, and to be an American were still being constructed at the time of the Revolution and were therefore in a state of flux. The fluid nature of these identities shows us how America's founding fathers' generation was full of ambiguity and a multiplicity choices. The first section of my thesis analyzes how Johnson's identity as a gentleman officer influenced his experience as a prisoner-of-war. I argue that Johnson's identity as an American patriot and his role as a double-agent can only be understood in relation to his conflicted identity as a provincial gentleman. The second section, on the identity of Vermont in the context of a new American nation, starts with historical background on the formation of Vermont first as part of New Hampshire, then as part of New York, and, finally, in negotiations with the British in Canada to rejoin the British empire, with which Johnson participated. In this section I argue that the shifting identities of colonial and revolutionary Vermont provided a backdrop of fluidity and change, as well as animosities between eastern and western residents, which influenced the identities of individual Vermonters during the war, including Thomas Johnson. For the national level, I look at how European Americans had divided loyalties during the war, with an emphasis on the Revolution as a civil war. My thesis departs from most historiography on the Revolution as a civil war, though, by examining it as a war with gray area - not just black and white, or Patriots versus Loyalists. I use this analysis to examine how Johnson's community was divided and why Johnson's neighbors reacted so diversely to the possibility that he was working with the British. In a last and brief section of my thesis, I look at how Johnson has been memorialized in his town's history, and how doubts of his American loyalty have all but disappeared over time, regardless of the intense debates they provoked during his lifetime. I aim to show that despite the consensus view that has shaped much of the historical memory of the American Revolution, the actual process of revolution was full of disorientation and turbulence. Advisors/Committee Members: Andrew Buchanan.

Subjects/Keywords: American Revolution; Haldimand; spy; Thomas Johnson; Vermont; American Studies; History

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Grove, A. N. (2015). Thomas Johnson: Gentleman, Vermonter, Patriot. (Thesis). University of Vermont. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/403

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Grove, Angela Nicole. “Thomas Johnson: Gentleman, Vermonter, Patriot.” 2015. Thesis, University of Vermont. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/403.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Grove, Angela Nicole. “Thomas Johnson: Gentleman, Vermonter, Patriot.” 2015. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Grove AN. Thomas Johnson: Gentleman, Vermonter, Patriot. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2015. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/403.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Grove AN. Thomas Johnson: Gentleman, Vermonter, Patriot. [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2015. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/403

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Vermont

2. MacNeil, Ronald Colin. Warren Robinson Austin: A Reluctant Cold Warrior.

Degree: MA, History, 2019, University of Vermont

Senator Warren Robison Austin (R-VT) was appointed by President Harry S. Truman to be the US Representative to the United Nations in June 1946. While a member of the US Senate, Austin had been a great advocate for internationalism and the United Nations. His tenure as Representative lasted until January 1953. The growing pains of the new organization were complicated by myriad contentious problems, not the least of which was the dawning of the Cold War. Austin was caught between the Soviet delegation, who were bent on opposing virtually all US initiatives at the UN, and members of the Truman Administration who were adamantly anti-communist/anti-Soviet. This thesis examines the role that anti-communism played in establishing an atmosphere of distrust leading, at least partly, to the Cold War; and Austin’s role at the United Nations as regards three representative issues that confronted the international organization during his tenure. The first issue was how the Soviets and the Western Powers disagreed over the question of unanimity of the permanent five members in the Security Council. Next, I will show how irreconcilable differences between the United States and the Soviets thwarted the functioning of the Atomic Energy Commission of the Security Council. Lastly, the Korean War is examined as the first use of a military response by the United Nations to international aggression. Austin dutifully represented the administration at the United Nations, but often expressed his own less confrontational views in meetings, speeches outside the UN, and in letters to friends and loved ones. He held the United Nations to be a positive force for peace, while other members of the administration were stridently anti-Soviet and found the United Nations to be the perfect ideological battleground while acting unilaterally outside the organization. I will show how Austin had an idealistic view of the United Nations and maintained that it was the best vehicle for the maintenance of peace. Also how he was, initially, more even-handed in dealing with the Soviet delegation than his overseers in the Truman administration. He eventually grew weary of Soviet tactics and their alleged aggression in Korea leading him to harden his outlook. Advisors/Committee Members: Nicole Phelps, Andrew Buchanan.

Subjects/Keywords: Cold War; Warren Austin; History

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

MacNeil, R. C. (2019). Warren Robinson Austin: A Reluctant Cold Warrior. (Thesis). University of Vermont. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/1033

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

MacNeil, Ronald Colin. “Warren Robinson Austin: A Reluctant Cold Warrior.” 2019. Thesis, University of Vermont. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/1033.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

MacNeil, Ronald Colin. “Warren Robinson Austin: A Reluctant Cold Warrior.” 2019. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

MacNeil RC. Warren Robinson Austin: A Reluctant Cold Warrior. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/1033.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

MacNeil RC. Warren Robinson Austin: A Reluctant Cold Warrior. [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2019. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/1033

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Vermont

3. Sullivan, Samantha. Personalities and Perceptions: Churchill, De Gaulle, and British-Free French Relations 1940-1941.

Degree: History, 2019, University of Vermont

In June 1940, the German army defeated and occupied France. French general Charles de Gaulle fled his home country for England, where he met with Prime Minister Winston Churchill to try to gain British military, economic, and political support for Free France, his organization that countered the Vichy government established in unoccupied France. The political relations between Free France and Britain were defined by the interpersonal relationship between Churchill and de Gaulle. The ties between these two leaders were defined both by the substantial convergence of interests in defeating Nazi Germany and by a predictable friction between two strong personalities. The reciprocal play between interests and personalities is important precisely for the indelible mark it left on the Allied cause and the future of Anglo-French relations. Advisors/Committee Members: Steven Zdatny, Andrew Buchanan, Meaghan Emery.

Subjects/Keywords: Churchill; De Gaulle; World War 1939-1945; Free France; Britain

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sullivan, S. (2019). Personalities and Perceptions: Churchill, De Gaulle, and British-Free French Relations 1940-1941. (Thesis). University of Vermont. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/hcoltheses/324

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sullivan, Samantha. “Personalities and Perceptions: Churchill, De Gaulle, and British-Free French Relations 1940-1941.” 2019. Thesis, University of Vermont. Accessed December 13, 2019. https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/hcoltheses/324.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sullivan, Samantha. “Personalities and Perceptions: Churchill, De Gaulle, and British-Free French Relations 1940-1941.” 2019. Web. 13 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Sullivan S. Personalities and Perceptions: Churchill, De Gaulle, and British-Free French Relations 1940-1941. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2019. [cited 2019 Dec 13]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/hcoltheses/324.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Sullivan S. Personalities and Perceptions: Churchill, De Gaulle, and British-Free French Relations 1940-1941. [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2019. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/hcoltheses/324

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.