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You searched for +publisher:"University of Vermont" +contributor:("Alan Rubin"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Vermont

1. McLaughlin, Sarah J. Nurse Practitioners' Discussion Of Sexual Identity, Attraction And Behavior.

Degree: MS, Nursing, 2016, University of Vermont

ABSTRACT Background: Sexual orientation is comprised of distinct components, including sexual identity, sexual attraction and sexual behavior. Lesbian, gay and bisexual adolescents are at an increased risk of experiencing poor health outcomes compared to non-sexual minority youth. Health care professional organizations recommend that health care providers discuss each component of sexual orientation at every adolescent health supervision visits in order to best assess the adolescent's health risks and needs for intervention and education. Objective: This survey assessed the frequency with which nurse practitioners (NPs) in the state of Vermont discussed sexual identity, attraction and behavior with adolescents during annual health supervision visits. Design: A cross sectional study that analyzed descriptive statistics of a small convenience sample of Vermont NPs. Setting and Participants: Attendees of the Vermont Nurse Practitioner Association 2015 annual conference. Participants in the study were licensed, practicing NPs in the state of Vermont responsible for the health supervision of adolescents. Results: Participants were overwhelmingly female (93%), with a median age between 40-49 years old, and a median length of years in practice of six to ten years. Sixty-two percent of respondents specialized in family practice. Respondents reported that they always asked adolescents about the sex of sexual partners at 49% of health supervision visits. Respondents always discussed sexual attraction and sexual identity at 31% and 24% of health supervision visits, respectively. Twenty percent of respondents reported rarely or never discussing sexual attraction, and 38% reported rarely or never discussing sexual identity. Conclusions: The Vermont NPs who participated in this survey were demographically similar to national NP cohorts. Vermont NPs discussed the adolescent's sexual behavior at health supervision visits as frequently as health care providers nationally, and Vermont NPs discussed sexual attraction and sexual identity more frequently than providers nationally. However, Vermont NPs discussed sexual attraction and identity much less frequently than they discussed sexual behavior. Results of this survey illustrate that there is substantial room for improvement regarding the frequency with which Vermont NPs discuss the three components of sexual orientation with adolescents, particularly the components of sexual identity and attraction. Advisors/Committee Members: Ellen Long-Middletong, Alan Rubin.

Subjects/Keywords: Adolescents; Health care; Nurse Practitioner; Primary care; Sexual minority; Sexual Orientation; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies; Medical Sciences; Nursing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McLaughlin, S. J. (2016). Nurse Practitioners' Discussion Of Sexual Identity, Attraction And Behavior. (Thesis). University of Vermont. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/443

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McLaughlin, Sarah J. “Nurse Practitioners' Discussion Of Sexual Identity, Attraction And Behavior.” 2016. Thesis, University of Vermont. Accessed October 18, 2019. https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/443.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McLaughlin, Sarah J. “Nurse Practitioners' Discussion Of Sexual Identity, Attraction And Behavior.” 2016. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

McLaughlin SJ. Nurse Practitioners' Discussion Of Sexual Identity, Attraction And Behavior. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/443.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

McLaughlin SJ. Nurse Practitioners' Discussion Of Sexual Identity, Attraction And Behavior. [Thesis]. University of Vermont; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/443

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Menon, Prema Ramachandran. Telemedicine Enhances Communication in the Intensive Care Unit.

Degree: PhD, Clinical and Translational Science, 2016, University of Vermont

Patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) are critically ill and often at extremely high risk of death. These patients receive aggressive interventions to prolong their lives. Despite these measures, many patients still succumb to their illness. Although ICU physicians are good at predicting which patients have a high risk of mortality, they are still offering interventions that do not prolong life, but potentially cause more suffering at the end of life. This is because there is a lack of high quality and early communication to discuss prognosis and establish patients' goals of care. This gap in communication is even more profound when patients are transferring from rural hospitals to busy tertiary care centers. This dissertation discusses the utilization of tele-video conferencing to enhance early communication with family members/loved ones of critically ill patients prior to their transfer from a rural hospital to a tertiary care center. It begins with a description of telemedicine and its uses in the ICU to date. Chapter 2 discusses the poor prognoses of patients receiving high intensity interventions such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The extremely dismal outcomes underscore the importance of early, thorough discussions regarding prognosis and goals of care in these patients. The next chapter describes a pilot study utilizing telemedicine to conduct formal unstructured telemedicine conferences with family members prior to transfer. This study demonstrated that palliative care consultations can be provided via telemedicine for critically ill patients and that adequate preparation and technical expertise are essential. Although this study is limited by the nature of the retrospective review, it is evident that more research is needed to further assess its applicability, utility and acceptability. Chapter 4 describes an investigation into the barriers and facilitators of conducting conferences via telemedicine and the perceptions of clinicians regarding the use of telemedicine for this purpose. This chapter identified unique barriers and facilitators to the use of telemedicine that will need to be addressed when designing a telemedicine intervention for conducting family conferences. This thesis describes the importance and process of implementation of telemedicine for the novel purpose of enhancing early communication among physicians and family members of critically ill loved ones. Further studies are needed to refine and investigate patient and family centered clinical outcomes utilizing this intervention. Advisors/Committee Members: Alan Rubin, Renee D. Stapleton.

Subjects/Keywords: Communication; Qualitative Research; Telemedicine; Medical Sciences

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Menon, P. R. (2016). Telemedicine Enhances Communication in the Intensive Care Unit. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Vermont. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/574

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Menon, Prema Ramachandran. “Telemedicine Enhances Communication in the Intensive Care Unit.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Vermont. Accessed October 18, 2019. https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/574.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Menon, Prema Ramachandran. “Telemedicine Enhances Communication in the Intensive Care Unit.” 2016. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Menon PR. Telemedicine Enhances Communication in the Intensive Care Unit. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Vermont; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/574.

Council of Science Editors:

Menon PR. Telemedicine Enhances Communication in the Intensive Care Unit. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Vermont; 2016. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/574


University of Vermont

3. Hamed, Ahmed A. An Exploratory Analysis of Twitter Keyword-Hashtag Networks and Knowledge Discovery Applications.

Degree: PhD, Computer Science, 2014, University of Vermont

The emergence of social media has impacted the way people think, communicate, behave, learn, and conduct research. In recent years, a large number of studies have analyzed and modeled this social phenomena. Driven by commercial and social interests, social media has become an attractive subject for researchers. Accordingly, new models, algorithms, and applications to address specific domains and solve distinct problems have erupted. In this thesis, we propose a novel network model and a path mining algorithm called HashnetMiner to discover implicit knowledge that is not easily exposed using other network models. Our experiments using HashnetMiner have demonstrated anecdotal evidence of drug-drug interactions when applied to a drug reaction context. The proposed research comprises three parts built upon the common theme of utilizing hashtags in tweets. 1 Digital Recruitment on Twitter. We build an expert system shell for two different studies: (1) a nicotine patch study where the system reads streams of tweets in real time and decides whether to recruit the senders to participate in the study, and (2) an environmental health study where the system identifies individuals who can participate in a survey using Twitter. 2 Does Social Media Big Data Make the World Smaller? This work provides an exploratory analysis of large-scale keyword-hashtag networks (K-H) generated from Twitter. We use two different measures, (1) the number of vertices that connect any two keywords, and (2) the eccentricity of keyword vertices, a well-known centrality and shortest path measure. Our analysis shows that K-H networks conform to the phenomenon of the shrinking world and expose hidden paths among concepts. 3 We pose the following biomedical web science question: Can patterns identified in Twitter hashtags provide clinicians with a powerful tool to extrapolate a new medical therapies and/or drugs? We present a systematic network mining method HashnetMiner, that operates on networks of medical concepts and hashtags. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort to present Biomedical Web Science models and algorithms that address such a question by means of data mining and knowledge discovery using hashtag-based networks. Advisors/Committee Members: Xindong Wu, Joshua Bongard, Alan Rubin.

Subjects/Keywords: Keyword-Hashtag Networks; Knowledge Discovery; Twitter; Recruitment; Marijuana-Drug Interaction; Artificial Intelligence and Robotics; Computer Sciences; Databases and Information Systems; OS and Networks; Social Statistics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hamed, A. A. (2014). An Exploratory Analysis of Twitter Keyword-Hashtag Networks and Knowledge Discovery Applications. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Vermont. Retrieved from https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/325

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hamed, Ahmed A. “An Exploratory Analysis of Twitter Keyword-Hashtag Networks and Knowledge Discovery Applications.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Vermont. Accessed October 18, 2019. https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/325.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hamed, Ahmed A. “An Exploratory Analysis of Twitter Keyword-Hashtag Networks and Knowledge Discovery Applications.” 2014. Web. 18 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hamed AA. An Exploratory Analysis of Twitter Keyword-Hashtag Networks and Knowledge Discovery Applications. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Vermont; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 18]. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/325.

Council of Science Editors:

Hamed AA. An Exploratory Analysis of Twitter Keyword-Hashtag Networks and Knowledge Discovery Applications. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Vermont; 2014. Available from: https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/graddis/325

.