Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Toronto" +contributor:("Tyndale, F Rachel"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Toronto

1. Craig, Evelyn. Nicotine Pharmacokinetics in Rats is altered as a function of Age in Early Adolescents and Adults.

Degree: 2014, University of Toronto

Adolescence is a vulnerable stage for the development of nicotine use and dependence. This vulnerability is often investigated in animal model studies. However, species-specific age differences in nicotine pharmacokinetics may confound the interpretation of these findings. We investigated differences in nicotine pharmacokinetics in early adolescent and adult rats following acute nicotine administration.

M.Sc.

Advisors/Committee Members: Tyndale, F Rachel, Pharmacology.

Subjects/Keywords: 0419

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Craig, E. (2014). Nicotine Pharmacokinetics in Rats is altered as a function of Age in Early Adolescents and Adults. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68551

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Craig, Evelyn. “Nicotine Pharmacokinetics in Rats is altered as a function of Age in Early Adolescents and Adults.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed November 17, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68551.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Craig, Evelyn. “Nicotine Pharmacokinetics in Rats is altered as a function of Age in Early Adolescents and Adults.” 2014. Web. 17 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Craig E. Nicotine Pharmacokinetics in Rats is altered as a function of Age in Early Adolescents and Adults. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2014. [cited 2017 Nov 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68551.

Council of Science Editors:

Craig E. Nicotine Pharmacokinetics in Rats is altered as a function of Age in Early Adolescents and Adults. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68551

2. Zhu, Zixing. The Interaction Between Genetics and Tobacco Consumption in Light Smokers.

Degree: PhD, 2014, University of Toronto

Smoking is the largest preventable cause of death globally. In North America, although the overall smoking prevalence has been declining, an increasing number of smokers consume less than 10 cigarettes per day and are referred to as light smokers. Today, light smokers represent more than 30% of the smoking population and are at risk for smoking related mortality and morbidity. For example, light smokers have approximately 15 times higher risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and approximately 20 times higher risk of developing lung cancer compared to non-smokers. Yet despite the high prevalence and substantial negative health consequences, light smokers are generally excluded from smoking related studies. Genetic variants in CYP2A6, encoding for the major nicotine-metabolizing enzyme, and CHRNA5-A3-B4, encoding for alpha5, alpha3, and beta4 nicotinic receptors, are associated with altered tobacco consumption in heavy smokers, yet little is known about the influence of CYP2A6 and CHRNA5-A3-B4 genetic variants on tobacco consumption and smoking cessation in light smokers. In a cross sectional study of 400 Alaska Native individuals, we demonstrated that light smokers had similar nicotine exposure (as indicated by their urinary total nicotine equivalents) as heavy smokers despite self-reporting lower number of cigarettes per day. Like heavy smokers, these light smokers titrated their tobacco consumption according to their CYP2A6 activity and CHRNA5-A3-B4 genotype. In addition, gene variants in CYP2A6 and CHRNA5-A3-B4 acted in combination to modify tobacco consumption. Furthermore, our biomarker analyses showed that variation in CYP2A6 metabolic activity, such as those that exist between CYP2A6 genotypes or the sexes, altered cotinine removal to a greater extent than cotinine formation. As a result, cotinine accumulates in individuals with lower CYP2A6 activity resulting in substantially higher cotinine levels for a given tobacco exposure. Overall, the characterization of tobacco consumption levels and the genetic contribution to tobacco consumption in light smokers improved our understanding of smoking behaviors in this increasingly prevalent population and could aid the development of more efficacious smoking cessation strategies. Advisors/Committee Members: Tyndale, F. Rachel, Pharmacology.

Subjects/Keywords: CHRNA5-A3-B4; Cotinine; CYP2A6; Smokeless tobacco; Smoking; 0419

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zhu, Z. (2014). The Interaction Between Genetics and Tobacco Consumption in Light Smokers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68098

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zhu, Zixing. “The Interaction Between Genetics and Tobacco Consumption in Light Smokers.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed November 17, 2017. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68098.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zhu, Zixing. “The Interaction Between Genetics and Tobacco Consumption in Light Smokers.” 2014. Web. 17 Nov 2017.

Vancouver:

Zhu Z. The Interaction Between Genetics and Tobacco Consumption in Light Smokers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2014. [cited 2017 Nov 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68098.

Council of Science Editors:

Zhu Z. The Interaction Between Genetics and Tobacco Consumption in Light Smokers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/68098

.