Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Toronto" +contributor:("Shoichet, Molly S"). Showing records 1 – 17 of 17 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Toronto

1. Parker, James. Affinity Release of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Increases the Viability of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells In Vitro.

Degree: 2015, University of Toronto

Poor cell survival in vitro and in vivo is a key challenge in tissue engineering. Pro-survival therapeutic proteins such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) can… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Affinity release; Cell viability; Hydrogel; Insulin-like growth factor-1; Retinal pigment epithelium; Tunable release; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Parker, J. (2015). Affinity Release of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Increases the Viability of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells In Vitro. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70518

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parker, James. “Affinity Release of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Increases the Viability of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells In Vitro.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70518.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parker, James. “Affinity Release of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Increases the Viability of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells In Vitro.” 2015. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Parker J. Affinity Release of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Increases the Viability of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells In Vitro. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70518.

Council of Science Editors:

Parker J. Affinity Release of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 Increases the Viability of Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells In Vitro. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/70518


University of Toronto

2. Arnold, Amy Elizabeth. Bioconjugate Strategies for Antisense Therapeutic Delivery to Glioblastoma Stem Cells.

Degree: PhD, 2020, University of Toronto

 Antisense therapeutics, including antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) and small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs), are powerful tools for regulating genes, making them a promising therapy for diseases… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Drug Delivery; Glioblastoma; Nucleic Acids; 0485

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Arnold, A. E. (2020). Bioconjugate Strategies for Antisense Therapeutic Delivery to Glioblastoma Stem Cells. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/100910

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arnold, Amy Elizabeth. “Bioconjugate Strategies for Antisense Therapeutic Delivery to Glioblastoma Stem Cells.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/100910.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arnold, Amy Elizabeth. “Bioconjugate Strategies for Antisense Therapeutic Delivery to Glioblastoma Stem Cells.” 2020. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Arnold AE. Bioconjugate Strategies for Antisense Therapeutic Delivery to Glioblastoma Stem Cells. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/100910.

Council of Science Editors:

Arnold AE. Bioconjugate Strategies for Antisense Therapeutic Delivery to Glioblastoma Stem Cells. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/100910


University of Toronto

3. Anandakumaran, Priya Nivashini. Co-delivery of Chondroitinase ABC and Pre-differentiated Progeny of Human Neuroepithelial Cells in Hydrogels to the Injured Spinal Cord.

Degree: 2016, University of Toronto

The inability of injured axons to regenerate across the lesion that forms following a spinal cord injury is largely attributed to their reduced growth capacity,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biomaterials; Cell Transplantation; Chondroitinase ABC; Hydrogels; Neuronal Precursor Cells; Spinal Cord Injury; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Anandakumaran, P. N. (2016). Co-delivery of Chondroitinase ABC and Pre-differentiated Progeny of Human Neuroepithelial Cells in Hydrogels to the Injured Spinal Cord. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97273

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Anandakumaran, Priya Nivashini. “Co-delivery of Chondroitinase ABC and Pre-differentiated Progeny of Human Neuroepithelial Cells in Hydrogels to the Injured Spinal Cord.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97273.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Anandakumaran, Priya Nivashini. “Co-delivery of Chondroitinase ABC and Pre-differentiated Progeny of Human Neuroepithelial Cells in Hydrogels to the Injured Spinal Cord.” 2016. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Anandakumaran PN. Co-delivery of Chondroitinase ABC and Pre-differentiated Progeny of Human Neuroepithelial Cells in Hydrogels to the Injured Spinal Cord. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97273.

Council of Science Editors:

Anandakumaran PN. Co-delivery of Chondroitinase ABC and Pre-differentiated Progeny of Human Neuroepithelial Cells in Hydrogels to the Injured Spinal Cord. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97273


University of Toronto

4. Ing, Sonja Tasia. Sustained Regional Anesthesia for Post-operative Pain Management.

Degree: 2018, University of Toronto

Acute post-operative pain is inevitable, yet current treatment strategies do not provide sufficient pain relief. While local anesthetics are widely used to achieve a regional… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Drug delivery; HAMC; Hydrogel; Local anesthetic; Pain; Sustained release; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ing, S. T. (2018). Sustained Regional Anesthesia for Post-operative Pain Management. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97671

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ing, Sonja Tasia. “Sustained Regional Anesthesia for Post-operative Pain Management.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97671.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ing, Sonja Tasia. “Sustained Regional Anesthesia for Post-operative Pain Management.” 2018. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ing ST. Sustained Regional Anesthesia for Post-operative Pain Management. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97671.

Council of Science Editors:

Ing ST. Sustained Regional Anesthesia for Post-operative Pain Management. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/97671


University of Toronto

5. Tuladhar, Anup. Local delivery of cyclosporine and erythropoietin promote functional recovery in a rodent model of stroke injury by endogenous tissue repair.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Toronto

 In the adult brain, endogenous neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs) can be stimulated to promote tissue and functional repair after traumatic injury, such as… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Brain repair; Drug delivery; Regenerative medicine; Stem cells; Stroke; Tissue engineering; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tuladhar, A. (2018). Local delivery of cyclosporine and erythropoietin promote functional recovery in a rodent model of stroke injury by endogenous tissue repair. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91957

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tuladhar, Anup. “Local delivery of cyclosporine and erythropoietin promote functional recovery in a rodent model of stroke injury by endogenous tissue repair.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91957.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tuladhar, Anup. “Local delivery of cyclosporine and erythropoietin promote functional recovery in a rodent model of stroke injury by endogenous tissue repair.” 2018. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Tuladhar A. Local delivery of cyclosporine and erythropoietin promote functional recovery in a rodent model of stroke injury by endogenous tissue repair. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91957.

Council of Science Editors:

Tuladhar A. Local delivery of cyclosporine and erythropoietin promote functional recovery in a rodent model of stroke injury by endogenous tissue repair. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91957


University of Toronto

6. Mitrousis, Nikolaos. A Bioengineering Approach Towards Retina Regeneration.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Toronto

 Currently, there is no cure for blindness. Pharmacology can only slow down the progression of a blinding disease, aiming at minimizing the symptoms. Stem cell… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biomaterials; Blindness; Cell Therapy; Regenerative Medicine; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mitrousis, N. (2018). A Bioengineering Approach Towards Retina Regeneration. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91970

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mitrousis, Nikolaos. “A Bioengineering Approach Towards Retina Regeneration.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91970.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mitrousis, Nikolaos. “A Bioengineering Approach Towards Retina Regeneration.” 2018. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Mitrousis N. A Bioengineering Approach Towards Retina Regeneration. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91970.

Council of Science Editors:

Mitrousis N. A Bioengineering Approach Towards Retina Regeneration. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91970


University of Toronto

7. Ngai, Jessica Wan-Yan. Local Delivery System to Reduce Pain in a Model of Back Surgery.

Degree: 2016, University of Toronto

Lumbar disc herniation is a common cause for lower back pain and reason for spinal surgery. Inevitably, patients will feel acute post-operative pain following surgery,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Biomaterial; Drug Delivery; Pain; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ngai, J. W. (2016). Local Delivery System to Reduce Pain in a Model of Back Surgery. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92623

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ngai, Jessica Wan-Yan. “Local Delivery System to Reduce Pain in a Model of Back Surgery.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92623.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ngai, Jessica Wan-Yan. “Local Delivery System to Reduce Pain in a Model of Back Surgery.” 2016. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ngai JW. Local Delivery System to Reduce Pain in a Model of Back Surgery. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92623.

Council of Science Editors:

Ngai JW. Local Delivery System to Reduce Pain in a Model of Back Surgery. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92623


University of Toronto

8. Kesselman, Leah Ranit Baskin. 3D Hydrogels for Astrocyte/Neural Progenitor Cell Co-cultures.

Degree: 2016, University of Toronto

This thesis explores the use of hyaluronic acid-based hydrogels as extracellular matrix mimics for growing astrocytes and neural progenitor cells in 3D. An examination of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: astrocyte; cell encapsulation; hydrogel; neural progenitor cell; 0542

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kesselman, L. R. B. (2016). 3D Hydrogels for Astrocyte/Neural Progenitor Cell Co-cultures. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/72681

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kesselman, Leah Ranit Baskin. “3D Hydrogels for Astrocyte/Neural Progenitor Cell Co-cultures.” 2016. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/72681.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kesselman, Leah Ranit Baskin. “3D Hydrogels for Astrocyte/Neural Progenitor Cell Co-cultures.” 2016. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kesselman LRB. 3D Hydrogels for Astrocyte/Neural Progenitor Cell Co-cultures. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/72681.

Council of Science Editors:

Kesselman LRB. 3D Hydrogels for Astrocyte/Neural Progenitor Cell Co-cultures. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/72681


University of Toronto

9. Smith, Kelti Aileen. Synthesis of a Reversible Crosslinked Hydrogel.

Degree: 2020, University of Toronto

Detachment of fragile cell types cultured on two-dimensional (2D) surfaces detrimentally affects cell viability. Accutase treatment of neurons growing in 2D damaged fragile neuronal connections,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: degradable; dynamic; hyaluronan; hydrogel; methylcellulose; TEV protease; 0542

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Smith, K. A. (2020). Synthesis of a Reversible Crosslinked Hydrogel. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/103122

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Smith, Kelti Aileen. “Synthesis of a Reversible Crosslinked Hydrogel.” 2020. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/103122.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Smith, Kelti Aileen. “Synthesis of a Reversible Crosslinked Hydrogel.” 2020. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Smith KA. Synthesis of a Reversible Crosslinked Hydrogel. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/103122.

Council of Science Editors:

Smith KA. Synthesis of a Reversible Crosslinked Hydrogel. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/103122


University of Toronto

10. Czupiel, Petro Pawlo. Synergistic Nanoparticle Formulations against Multi-drug Resistant Breast Cancers.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Toronto

 Current breast cancer treatments lack specificity, leading to dose-limiting cardiotoxicity, which is often coupled with multi-drug resistance (MDR), and thus severely impedes efficacious cancer treatment.… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cancer; chemotherapeutics; Mitochondria; Multi-drug resistance; Nanoparticles; Synergistic; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Czupiel, P. P. (2019). Synergistic Nanoparticle Formulations against Multi-drug Resistant Breast Cancers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/98593

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Czupiel, Petro Pawlo. “Synergistic Nanoparticle Formulations against Multi-drug Resistant Breast Cancers.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/98593.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Czupiel, Petro Pawlo. “Synergistic Nanoparticle Formulations against Multi-drug Resistant Breast Cancers.” 2019. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Czupiel PP. Synergistic Nanoparticle Formulations against Multi-drug Resistant Breast Cancers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/98593.

Council of Science Editors:

Czupiel PP. Synergistic Nanoparticle Formulations against Multi-drug Resistant Breast Cancers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/98593


University of Toronto

11. Payne, Samantha Louise. An Investigation of the Impact of Cell Maturity on Transplantation Success for Stroke.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Toronto

 Stroke is a devastating disease that affects millions of people worldwide and leads to lifelong disabilities. Increasingly, transplantation of an exogenous source of cells is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cell Delivery; Hydrogel; Neuroscience; Regenerative Medicine; Stem Cells; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Payne, S. L. (2018). An Investigation of the Impact of Cell Maturity on Transplantation Success for Stroke. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92016

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Payne, Samantha Louise. “An Investigation of the Impact of Cell Maturity on Transplantation Success for Stroke.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92016.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Payne, Samantha Louise. “An Investigation of the Impact of Cell Maturity on Transplantation Success for Stroke.” 2018. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Payne SL. An Investigation of the Impact of Cell Maturity on Transplantation Success for Stroke. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92016.

Council of Science Editors:

Payne SL. An Investigation of the Impact of Cell Maturity on Transplantation Success for Stroke. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92016


University of Toronto

12. Logie, Jennifer. Design and Synthesis of Self-Assembled Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Drug Delivery.

Degree: PhD, 2017, University of Toronto

 Current chemotherapeutics are plagued by poor solubility and selectivity, requiring toxic excipients in formulations and causing a number of dose limiting side effects. Nanoparticle delivery… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cancer; Drug Delivery; Micelle; Nanoparticle; Polymer; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Logie, J. (2017). Design and Synthesis of Self-Assembled Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Drug Delivery. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/79178

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Logie, Jennifer. “Design and Synthesis of Self-Assembled Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Drug Delivery.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/79178.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Logie, Jennifer. “Design and Synthesis of Self-Assembled Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Drug Delivery.” 2017. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Logie J. Design and Synthesis of Self-Assembled Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Drug Delivery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/79178.

Council of Science Editors:

Logie J. Design and Synthesis of Self-Assembled Polymeric Nanoparticles for Cancer Drug Delivery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/79178


University of Toronto

13. Obermeyer, Jaclyn Marie. Encapsulation-Free Local Delivery of BDNF Enhances Recovery in Stroke-Injured Rats.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Toronto

 Until the early 1990s it was common belief that the adult brain did not possess the capacity to change or regenerate. We now know that… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: BDNF; biomaterials; drug delivery; hydrogel; nanoparticle; stroke; 0542

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Obermeyer, J. M. (2018). Encapsulation-Free Local Delivery of BDNF Enhances Recovery in Stroke-Injured Rats. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92138

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Obermeyer, Jaclyn Marie. “Encapsulation-Free Local Delivery of BDNF Enhances Recovery in Stroke-Injured Rats.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92138.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Obermeyer, Jaclyn Marie. “Encapsulation-Free Local Delivery of BDNF Enhances Recovery in Stroke-Injured Rats.” 2018. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Obermeyer JM. Encapsulation-Free Local Delivery of BDNF Enhances Recovery in Stroke-Injured Rats. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92138.

Council of Science Editors:

Obermeyer JM. Encapsulation-Free Local Delivery of BDNF Enhances Recovery in Stroke-Injured Rats. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/92138


University of Toronto

14. Ganesh, Ahil. Controlling the Stability of Colloidal Drug Aggregates for Chemotherapeutic Delivery.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Toronto

 Colloidal aggregation presents a significant nuisance in drug discovery programs; the self-assembly of hydrophobic compounds into colloidal particles leads to numerous artifactual results in screening… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: 0542

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ganesh, A. (2019). Controlling the Stability of Colloidal Drug Aggregates for Chemotherapeutic Delivery. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95863

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ganesh, Ahil. “Controlling the Stability of Colloidal Drug Aggregates for Chemotherapeutic Delivery.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95863.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ganesh, Ahil. “Controlling the Stability of Colloidal Drug Aggregates for Chemotherapeutic Delivery.” 2019. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Ganesh A. Controlling the Stability of Colloidal Drug Aggregates for Chemotherapeutic Delivery. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2019. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95863.

Council of Science Editors:

Ganesh A. Controlling the Stability of Colloidal Drug Aggregates for Chemotherapeutic Delivery. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95863


University of Toronto

15. Pakulska, Malgorzata Maria. Combined Delivery of Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and Stromal Cell Derived Factor 1α (SDF1α) for Spinal Cord Regeneration.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Toronto

Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that affects millions of people worldwide. Successful drug therapies for SCI have been difficult to achieve due… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: adult stem cells; chondroitinase abc; CXCL12; drug delivery; glial scar; spinal cord; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pakulska, M. M. (2016). Combined Delivery of Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and Stromal Cell Derived Factor 1α (SDF1α) for Spinal Cord Regeneration. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89261

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pakulska, Malgorzata Maria. “Combined Delivery of Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and Stromal Cell Derived Factor 1α (SDF1α) for Spinal Cord Regeneration.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89261.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pakulska, Malgorzata Maria. “Combined Delivery of Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and Stromal Cell Derived Factor 1α (SDF1α) for Spinal Cord Regeneration.” 2016. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Pakulska MM. Combined Delivery of Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and Stromal Cell Derived Factor 1α (SDF1α) for Spinal Cord Regeneration. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89261.

Council of Science Editors:

Pakulska MM. Combined Delivery of Chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) and Stromal Cell Derived Factor 1α (SDF1α) for Spinal Cord Regeneration. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89261


University of Toronto

16. Fisher, Stephanie Anne. Development of a Breast Cancer Cell Microenvironment in Three-Dimensional Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels.

Degree: PhD, 2018, University of Toronto

 Breast cancer cell invasion is influenced by the tumor microenvironment including the extracellular matrix, mechanical properties, stromal cells, and bioactive factors. To elucidate the role… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Breast cancer; Epidermal growth factor; Gradients; Hydrogel; Invasion; Photochemistry; 0541

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Fisher, S. A. (2018). Development of a Breast Cancer Cell Microenvironment in Three-Dimensional Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89784

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Fisher, Stephanie Anne. “Development of a Breast Cancer Cell Microenvironment in Three-Dimensional Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89784.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Fisher, Stephanie Anne. “Development of a Breast Cancer Cell Microenvironment in Three-Dimensional Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels.” 2018. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Fisher SA. Development of a Breast Cancer Cell Microenvironment in Three-Dimensional Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89784.

Council of Science Editors:

Fisher SA. Development of a Breast Cancer Cell Microenvironment in Three-Dimensional Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89784


University of Toronto

17. Elliott Donaghue, Irja. Controlled Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins to the Injured Spinal Cord.

Degree: PhD, 2016, University of Toronto

Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in severe disability and currently lacks effective clinical treatments. Pre-clinical and clinical research have demonstrated the potential for both cell… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: drug delivery; hydrogel; nanoparticle; PLGA; protein; spinal cord injury; 0542

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Elliott Donaghue, I. (2016). Controlled Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins to the Injured Spinal Cord. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/73176

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Elliott Donaghue, Irja. “Controlled Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins to the Injured Spinal Cord.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 08, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/73176.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Elliott Donaghue, Irja. “Controlled Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins to the Injured Spinal Cord.” 2016. Web. 08 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Elliott Donaghue I. Controlled Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins to the Injured Spinal Cord. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. [cited 2021 Mar 08]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/73176.

Council of Science Editors:

Elliott Donaghue I. Controlled Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins to the Injured Spinal Cord. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/73176

.