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You searched for +publisher:"University of Toronto" +contributor:("Orser, Beverley A"). Showing records 1 – 8 of 8 total matches.

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University of Toronto

1. Haffey, Sean Christopher. Probing the Role of Astrocytes in Postanesthetic Memory Deficits.

Degree: 2015, University of Toronto

Many patients who undergo surgery and general anesthesia suffer from memory impairments for weeks to months afterwards. However, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Astrocytes; Electrophysiology; Etomidate; GABA; Hippocampus; Tonic Inhibition; 0719

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APA (6th Edition):

Haffey, S. C. (2015). Probing the Role of Astrocytes in Postanesthetic Memory Deficits. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/74727

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haffey, Sean Christopher. “Probing the Role of Astrocytes in Postanesthetic Memory Deficits.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/74727.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haffey, Sean Christopher. “Probing the Role of Astrocytes in Postanesthetic Memory Deficits.” 2015. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Haffey SC. Probing the Role of Astrocytes in Postanesthetic Memory Deficits. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/74727.

Council of Science Editors:

Haffey SC. Probing the Role of Astrocytes in Postanesthetic Memory Deficits. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/74727


University of Toronto

2. Mostafa, Fariya. Harnessing Neuronal-glial Interactions to Prevent Postanesthetic Cognitive Deficit.

Degree: 2017, University of Toronto

General anesthetics trigger memory deficits that persist long after the anesthetics have been eliminated, by increasing an extrasynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated tonic inhibitory current in the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Astrocytes; Dexmedetomidine; Electrohpysiology; General Anethetics; Postoperative Cognitive Disorders; Treatment mechanisms; 0719

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APA (6th Edition):

Mostafa, F. (2017). Harnessing Neuronal-glial Interactions to Prevent Postanesthetic Cognitive Deficit. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/94257

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mostafa, Fariya. “Harnessing Neuronal-glial Interactions to Prevent Postanesthetic Cognitive Deficit.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/94257.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mostafa, Fariya. “Harnessing Neuronal-glial Interactions to Prevent Postanesthetic Cognitive Deficit.” 2017. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Mostafa F. Harnessing Neuronal-glial Interactions to Prevent Postanesthetic Cognitive Deficit. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/94257.

Council of Science Editors:

Mostafa F. Harnessing Neuronal-glial Interactions to Prevent Postanesthetic Cognitive Deficit. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/94257


University of Toronto

3. Kaneshwaran, Kirusanthy. Investigating the central role of astrocytes in mediating postanesthetic memory deficits.

Degree: 2017, University of Toronto

Anesthetics cause postanesthetic memory deficits in animal models, and similar deficits may contribute to postoperative delirium and cognitive dysfunction in patients. We previously showed using… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Anesthesia; Astrocytes; Electrophysiology; Memory; Îł-aminobutyric acid; 0317

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APA (6th Edition):

Kaneshwaran, K. (2017). Investigating the central role of astrocytes in mediating postanesthetic memory deficits. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/79371

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kaneshwaran, Kirusanthy. “Investigating the central role of astrocytes in mediating postanesthetic memory deficits.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/79371.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kaneshwaran, Kirusanthy. “Investigating the central role of astrocytes in mediating postanesthetic memory deficits.” 2017. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Kaneshwaran K. Investigating the central role of astrocytes in mediating postanesthetic memory deficits. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2017. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/79371.

Council of Science Editors:

Kaneshwaran K. Investigating the central role of astrocytes in mediating postanesthetic memory deficits. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/79371


University of Toronto

4. Yu, Jieying. A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors.

Degree: 2014, University of Toronto

Gabapentin is a widely used anticonvulsant and analgesic drug that also causes anxiolysis, sedation and ataxia. The mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. Previously,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: anxiety; delta; extrasynaptic; GABAA; gabapentin; pain; 0317

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APA (6th Edition):

Yu, J. (2014). A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82642

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yu, Jieying. “A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82642.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yu, Jieying. “A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors.” 2014. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Yu J. A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82642.

Council of Science Editors:

Yu J. A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82642


University of Toronto

5. Yu, Jieying. A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors.

Degree: 2014, University of Toronto

Gabapentin is a widely used anticonvulsant and analgesic drug that also causes anxiolysis, sedation and ataxia. The mechanisms underlying these effects are poorly understood. Previously,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: anxiety; delta; extrasynaptic; GABAA; gabapentin; pain; 0317

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yu, J. (2014). A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82641

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yu, Jieying. “A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors.” 2014. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82641.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yu, Jieying. “A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors.” 2014. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Yu J. A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2014. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82641.

Council of Science Editors:

Yu J. A Novel Mechanism for Gabapentin Actions: Up-regulation of δGABAA Receptors. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/82641


University of Toronto

6. To, William T.H. Systemic Inflammation Increases the Efficacy of Anesthetics that Target GABAA Receptors.

Degree: 2013, University of Toronto

Systemic inflammation markedly increases the neurodepressive properties of general anesthetics, for reasons that have remained poorly understood. The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) increases the… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: anesthesia; neuroscience; GABAA receptor; inflammation; 0317

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APA (6th Edition):

To, W. T. H. (2013). Systemic Inflammation Increases the Efficacy of Anesthetics that Target GABAA Receptors. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/69763

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

To, William T H. “Systemic Inflammation Increases the Efficacy of Anesthetics that Target GABAA Receptors.” 2013. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/69763.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

To, William T H. “Systemic Inflammation Increases the Efficacy of Anesthetics that Target GABAA Receptors.” 2013. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

To WTH. Systemic Inflammation Increases the Efficacy of Anesthetics that Target GABAA Receptors. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2013. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/69763.

Council of Science Editors:

To WTH. Systemic Inflammation Increases the Efficacy of Anesthetics that Target GABAA Receptors. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/69763


University of Toronto

7. Zurek, Agnieszka A. Increased Activity of GABA(A) Receptors Contributes to Postanesthetic Memory Deficits.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Toronto

General anesthetics are widely used to allow patients to tolerate surgery and to sedate patients in intensive care units. Anesthesia causes long-term memory deficits in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Anesthesia; GABA; Memory; tonic inhibition; 0317

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zurek, A. A. (2015). Increased Activity of GABA(A) Receptors Contributes to Postanesthetic Memory Deficits. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/77714

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zurek, Agnieszka A. “Increased Activity of GABA(A) Receptors Contributes to Postanesthetic Memory Deficits.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/77714.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zurek, Agnieszka A. “Increased Activity of GABA(A) Receptors Contributes to Postanesthetic Memory Deficits.” 2015. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Zurek AA. Increased Activity of GABA(A) Receptors Contributes to Postanesthetic Memory Deficits. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/77714.

Council of Science Editors:

Zurek AA. Increased Activity of GABA(A) Receptors Contributes to Postanesthetic Memory Deficits. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/77714


University of Toronto

8. Lecker, Irina. Tranexamic Acid Modulation of Excitatory and Inhibitory Amino Acid Receptors: A Potential Mechanism for Postoperative Seizures.

Degree: PhD, 2015, University of Toronto

Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic drug that is used worldwide to reduce blood loss in a variety of hemorrhagic conditions. TXA causes seizures and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Glycine; Ion channels; Seizures; Tonic current; Tranexamic acid; 0317

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APA (6th Edition):

Lecker, I. (2015). Tranexamic Acid Modulation of Excitatory and Inhibitory Amino Acid Receptors: A Potential Mechanism for Postoperative Seizures. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89475

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lecker, Irina. “Tranexamic Acid Modulation of Excitatory and Inhibitory Amino Acid Receptors: A Potential Mechanism for Postoperative Seizures.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed March 04, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89475.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lecker, Irina. “Tranexamic Acid Modulation of Excitatory and Inhibitory Amino Acid Receptors: A Potential Mechanism for Postoperative Seizures.” 2015. Web. 04 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Lecker I. Tranexamic Acid Modulation of Excitatory and Inhibitory Amino Acid Receptors: A Potential Mechanism for Postoperative Seizures. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2015. [cited 2021 Mar 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89475.

Council of Science Editors:

Lecker I. Tranexamic Acid Modulation of Excitatory and Inhibitory Amino Acid Receptors: A Potential Mechanism for Postoperative Seizures. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/89475

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