Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"University of Toronto" +contributor:("Linguistics"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


University of Toronto

1. Clare, Emily J. Dynamicity in Speech Perception.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Toronto

Human listeners dynamically adjust their perceptual category boundaries and cue weights following brief exposure to idiosyncratic speech (Norris et al., 2003; Idemaru and Holt, 2011). This dissertation presents five experiments, each exploring a different facet of when and how listeners recalibrate. The first three experiments use the classical perceptual learning paradigm, where listeners are exposed to speech exhibiting an idiosyncratic pattern, such as an atypically high VOT boundary between /t/ and /d/, and then tested on whether they adjusted their boundary according to that training. Experiment 1 used weaker evidence to train listeners on the pattern than previous studies, by using word-initial targets in training. Experiment 2 exposed listeners to a more complex pattern than previous studies, by using a second-order (i.e. context-dependent) idiosyncrasy. In both experiments, listeners succeeded at learning. Experiment 3 tested whether listeners make use of phonological category knowledge in learning these patterns. There was no evidence of learning. However, some methodological weaknesses made it difficult to conclude that listeners could not learn this type of pattern; further work is needed to assess this. The last two experiments looked at cue reweighting  – reliance on different acoustic cues to the same contrast. Experiment 4 tested the effects of noise on cue weighting. It confirmed previous work showing that noise affects cue weighting, and expanded beyond previous work in showing that different types of noise affect cue weighting differently. Noise especially suppressed reliance on cues incongruent in periodicity with the noise type, suggesting listeners may be sensitive to spectral characteristics of background noise in adaptive cue reweighting. Experiment 5 was the first test of unsupervised learning of cue reweighting based on exposure. Listeners were exposed to a contrast varying on along two acoustic dimensions where one was a more reliable cue than the other. The results suggested that listeners learned to reweight perceptual cues based on their exposure, supporting the hypothesis that listeners implicitly learn multi-dimensional statistical distributions in speech. Together, these experiments provide new data and contribute novel methodologies to further our understanding of the dynamic nature of adaptation in human speech perception. Advisors/Committee Members: Schertz, Jessamyn, Linguistics.

Subjects/Keywords: implicit learning; phonetics; psycholinguistics; speech perception; 0290

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clare, E. J. (2019). Dynamicity in Speech Perception. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95776

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clare, Emily J. “Dynamicity in Speech Perception.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95776.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clare, Emily J. “Dynamicity in Speech Perception.” 2019. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Clare EJ. Dynamicity in Speech Perception. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95776.

Council of Science Editors:

Clare EJ. Dynamicity in Speech Perception. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95776


University of Toronto

2. Osadcha, Iryna. Lexical Stress in East Slavic: Variation in Space and Time.

Degree: PhD, 2019, University of Toronto

Lexical stress systems are known for their complexity and dependence on morphology. This thesis proposes a unified account of nominal stress in three East Slavic languages (Ukrainian, Russian, and Belarusian). When analyzed individually and without diachronic context, they seem to be unpredictable. In addition, most existing formal analyses of individual East Slavic languages omit some stress patterns as non-significant or treat them as exceptional. The analysis here employs single bracketed grid representations. Whereas analyses using Optimality Theory tend to incur some descriptive and theoretical problems, this framework enables an analysis that covers all existing stress patterns in the three languages, and sheds light on the synchronic and diachronic patterning of lexical stress systems. Tracing the development of stress in nominal inflectional paradigms from Common Slavic to the modern East Slavic languages shifts the focus from the Russian stress system, which continues to be the most studied, and puts it into a broader context. It is found that a historical opposition between accented and unaccented stems and suffixes, which became obscure due to a series of sound changes, has been gradually replaced by a new opposition between singular and plural subparadigms. This new opposition led to the emergence of shifting stems with stress patterns that depend on number, and to the subsequent reanalysis of many historically unaccented and post-accenting stems and some accented stems as shifting. Putting the burden of accentual contrast on the stem led to the loss of lexical accent from the suffixes. Since this tendency has not yet been completed and has proceeded at a different pace in each of the three languages, their stress systems vary in the degree of regularization, with Belarusian being the most regular, Ukrainian in the middle, and Russian the least regular. The introduction of shifting stems, which are marked in the lexicon as being subject to the shifting rules, makes possible an analysis which covers all existing nominal stress patterns in Russian, Ukrainian, and Belarusian. Advisors/Committee Members: Dresher, Elan B, Linguistics.

Subjects/Keywords: Accentology; East Slavic languages; Lexical stress; Phonology; 0290

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Osadcha, I. (2019). Lexical Stress in East Slavic: Variation in Space and Time. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95964

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Osadcha, Iryna. “Lexical Stress in East Slavic: Variation in Space and Time.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95964.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Osadcha, Iryna. “Lexical Stress in East Slavic: Variation in Space and Time.” 2019. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Osadcha I. Lexical Stress in East Slavic: Variation in Space and Time. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95964.

Council of Science Editors:

Osadcha I. Lexical Stress in East Slavic: Variation in Space and Time. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/95964

.