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You searched for +publisher:"University of Toronto" +contributor:("Gupta, Neeru"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Toronto

1. Kim, Min Hui. A Model to Measure Lymphatic Drainage from the Eye.

Degree: 2011, University of Toronto

Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the most important risk factor for glaucoma development and progression. Most anti-glaucoma treatments aim to lower IOP by enhancing aqueous humor drainage from the eye. Aqueous humor drainage occurs via well-characterized trabecular meshwork (TM) and uveoscleral (UVS) pathways, and the recently described ciliary lymphatics. The relative contribution of the lymphatic pathway to aqueous drainage is not known. We developed a sheep model to quantitatively assess lymphatic drainage along with TM and UVS outflows. Following intracameral injection of 125I-bovine serum albumin (BSA), lymph and blood samples were continuously collected. Lymphatic and TM drainage were quantitatively assessed by measuring 125I-BSA recovery. This quantitative sheep model enables assessment of relative contributions of lymphatic drainage (1.64% ± 0.89%), TM (68.86% ± 9.27%) and UVS outflows (19.87% ± 5.59%), and may help to better understand the effects of glaucoma agents on outflow pathways.

MAST

Advisors/Committee Members: Johnston, Miles, Gupta, Neeru, Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.

Subjects/Keywords: Aqueous humor; Lymphatic system; Uveoscleral outflow; Glaucoma; Sheep; 0381

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APA (6th Edition):

Kim, M. H. (2011). A Model to Measure Lymphatic Drainage from the Eye. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31281

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kim, Min Hui. “A Model to Measure Lymphatic Drainage from the Eye.” 2011. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31281.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kim, Min Hui. “A Model to Measure Lymphatic Drainage from the Eye.” 2011. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Kim MH. A Model to Measure Lymphatic Drainage from the Eye. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2011. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31281.

Council of Science Editors:

Kim MH. A Model to Measure Lymphatic Drainage from the Eye. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/31281


University of Toronto

2. Khattak, Shireen Shafqat. In Vivo Conjunctival Lymphatic Drainage Measured in Normal and Cancer Conditions by Photoacoustic Imaging.

Degree: 2018, University of Toronto

The conjunctiva is a mucous layer which provides a physical barrier against the external environment. Lymphatic vessels within the conjunctiva drain excess interstitial fluid, contribute to immune surveillance, and are involved ocular surface inflammatory and neoplastic diseases, including conjunctival melanoma. Our understanding of conjunctival lymphatics is limited due to the lack of in-vivo imaging techniques to quantify lymphatic drainage. Using photoacoustic imaging and a near-infrared tracer, we quantified lymphatic drainage from the conjunctiva to cervical lymph nodes in normal mice. Lymphatic drainage from the conjunctiva was also assessed in a model of pigmented conjunctival melanoma. Lymphatic drainage after tracer injection within or around the tumour was similar to that observed in normal mice. Additionally, we monitored patterns of tumour growth over time using photoacoustic quantification of the tumour melanin signal. This non-invasive quantitative platform may be useful for future studies of conjunctival lymphatics in conjunctival melanoma and other ocular diseases.

M.Sc.

Advisors/Committee Members: Gupta, Neeru, Yucel, Yeni, Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.

Subjects/Keywords: conjunctival melanoma; in vivo; lymphatic drainage; melanin; near-infrared; photoacoustic imaging; 0306

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Khattak, S. S. (2018). In Vivo Conjunctival Lymphatic Drainage Measured in Normal and Cancer Conditions by Photoacoustic Imaging. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91660

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Khattak, Shireen Shafqat. “In Vivo Conjunctival Lymphatic Drainage Measured in Normal and Cancer Conditions by Photoacoustic Imaging.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91660.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Khattak, Shireen Shafqat. “In Vivo Conjunctival Lymphatic Drainage Measured in Normal and Cancer Conditions by Photoacoustic Imaging.” 2018. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Khattak SS. In Vivo Conjunctival Lymphatic Drainage Measured in Normal and Cancer Conditions by Photoacoustic Imaging. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91660.

Council of Science Editors:

Khattak SS. In Vivo Conjunctival Lymphatic Drainage Measured in Normal and Cancer Conditions by Photoacoustic Imaging. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91660


University of Toronto

3. Ramsaroop, Lynzey. Delayed Oxidative Injury to the Superior Colliculus and Retinal Changes After Cerebral Hypoperfusion/Reperfusion Injury.

Degree: 2009, University of Toronto

Damage to visual pathways can lead to irreversible blindness. Posterior visual pathways, located within a watershed area, are predisposed to hypoperfusion/reperfusion injury. In a novel rat model of bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO), oxidative injury to the superior colliculus (SC), a major visual center within the watershed area was evaluated, in addition to its effects on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Nitrotyrosine, a footprint of peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative injury in the SC, and microtubule-associated protein 2, a dendrite marker in the retina, were assessed using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Nitrotyrosine-immunoreactivity in the SC was increased 2 weeks after BCCAO compared to controls. Microtubule-associated protein 2-immunoreactivity in the central inner plexiform layer was reduced 3 weeks after BCCAO compared to controls. Global incomplete cerebral hypoperfusion/reperfusion induced oxidative injury in the SC and retrograde RGC dendritic changes. This suggests that cerebrovascular injury affecting the posterior visual pathways may contribute to vision loss in patients.

MAST

Advisors/Committee Members: Yucel, Yeni, Gupta, Neeru, Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.

Subjects/Keywords: bilateral common carotid artery occlusion; superior colliculus; nitrotyrosine; rodent; retinal ganglion cell; stroke; 0317

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ramsaroop, L. (2009). Delayed Oxidative Injury to the Superior Colliculus and Retinal Changes After Cerebral Hypoperfusion/Reperfusion Injury. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17441

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ramsaroop, Lynzey. “Delayed Oxidative Injury to the Superior Colliculus and Retinal Changes After Cerebral Hypoperfusion/Reperfusion Injury.” 2009. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17441.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ramsaroop, Lynzey. “Delayed Oxidative Injury to the Superior Colliculus and Retinal Changes After Cerebral Hypoperfusion/Reperfusion Injury.” 2009. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Ramsaroop L. Delayed Oxidative Injury to the Superior Colliculus and Retinal Changes After Cerebral Hypoperfusion/Reperfusion Injury. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17441.

Council of Science Editors:

Ramsaroop L. Delayed Oxidative Injury to the Superior Colliculus and Retinal Changes After Cerebral Hypoperfusion/Reperfusion Injury. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/17441

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