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You searched for +publisher:"University of Toronto" +contributor:("Coburn, Bryan"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Toronto

1. Prescod, Janice Evana. Optimized Analysis of the Lung Allograft Microbiota from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid.

Degree: 2018, University of Toronto

Introduction: Use of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) for analysis of the allograft microbiota in lung transplant recipients (LTR) by culture-independent analysis poses specific challenges due to its highly variable bacterial density. Approach: We developed a methodology to analyze low-density BALF using a serially diluted mock community and BALF from uninfected LTR. Methods/Results: A mock microbial community was used to establish the properties of true-positive taxa and contaminants in BALF. Contaminants had an inverse relationship with input bacterial density. Concentrating samples increased the bacterial density and the ratio of community taxa (signal) to contaminants (noise), whereas DNase treatment decreased density and signal:noise. Systematic removal of contaminants had an important impact on microbiota-inflammation correlations in BALF. Conclusions: There is an inverse relationship between microbial density and the proportion of contaminants within microbial communities across the density range of BALF. This study has implications for the analysis and interpretation of BALF microbiota.

M.Sc.

Advisors/Committee Members: Coburn, Bryan, Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.

Subjects/Keywords: Allograft microbiota; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid; Lung Transplant; Microbiome; 0410

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Prescod, J. E. (2018). Optimized Analysis of the Lung Allograft Microbiota from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91350

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Prescod, Janice Evana. “Optimized Analysis of the Lung Allograft Microbiota from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91350.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Prescod, Janice Evana. “Optimized Analysis of the Lung Allograft Microbiota from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid.” 2018. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Prescod JE. Optimized Analysis of the Lung Allograft Microbiota from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91350.

Council of Science Editors:

Prescod JE. Optimized Analysis of the Lung Allograft Microbiota from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91350


University of Toronto

2. Bansal, Saumya. Assaying the Microbiome During Critical Illness.

Degree: 2018, University of Toronto

Critical illness is associated with large-scale perturbations in the gut microbiota. We compared four sample types in intensive care unit patients – rectal, nares, and antecubital swabs, and stool – using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Stool was obtained in 31% of attempts, while swabs were reliably obtained (≥97% of attempts). Although not compositionally identical, rectal swabs captured microbiota perturbations in critically ill patients similar to those previously described using stool. Additionally, potentially informative changes in the gut microbiome occurring during late-onset sepsis in an ICU were captured using shotgun metagenomic sequencing of rectal swabs. Initiation of empiric antibiotic therapy was associated with compositional collapse of the gut microbiome within 24 hours, with Pseudomonas aeruginosa becoming the dominant community member and acquiring genomic variants in resistance-associated loci. Overall, rectal swabs were easily obtained and captured compositional and metagenomic perturbations common during critical illness, demonstrating their potential utility for microbiome analysis in this population.

M.Sc.

Advisors/Committee Members: Coburn, Bryan, Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.

Subjects/Keywords: Critically Illness; Late-onset infections; Microbiome; Sepsis; 0566

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bansal, S. (2018). Assaying the Microbiome During Critical Illness. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91360

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bansal, Saumya. “Assaying the Microbiome During Critical Illness.” 2018. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed December 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91360.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bansal, Saumya. “Assaying the Microbiome During Critical Illness.” 2018. Web. 04 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Bansal S. Assaying the Microbiome During Critical Illness. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. [cited 2020 Dec 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91360.

Council of Science Editors:

Bansal S. Assaying the Microbiome During Critical Illness. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/91360

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