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You searched for +publisher:"University of Toronto" +contributor:("Calzavara, Liviana"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Toronto

1. Ip, David Tai Wai. Correlates of Condom Use among Single, Sexually Active Ontario Adults: Data from the 1996/97 Ontario Health Survey.

Degree: 2012, University of Toronto

OBJECTIVE: To examine the past-year prevalence and frequency of condom use and to identify correlates of condom use among young, unattached heterosexual Ontarians. METHODS: Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression were used to analyze the 1996/97 Ontario Health Survey (OHS), a cross-sectional, random digit-dialling (RDD) survey of 36,892 Ontario residents of households with a telephone line. RESULTS: Between 1996 and 1997, 61.3% (95% CI=58.5%-64.1%) of the study sample (aged 15-44, n=1,949) reported consistent (always) condom use and 11.8% (95% CI=10.2%-13.5%) reported never using condoms. Significant correlates included, for both sexes, health planning region, age, ethnic origin, and type of smoker; for females only, socio-economic status, age at first sexual intercourse, and past-month oral contraceptive use ; and for males only, number of past-year sexual partners, HIV testing history, and past-year frequency of religious attendance. CONCLUSIONS: Findings constitute a cross-sectional component for examining the long-term trend of condom use in Ontario.

MAST

Advisors/Committee Members: Calzavara, Liviana, Dalla Lana School of Public Health.

Subjects/Keywords: condom use; correlates; 0766

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APA (6th Edition):

Ip, D. T. W. (2012). Correlates of Condom Use among Single, Sexually Active Ontario Adults: Data from the 1996/97 Ontario Health Survey. (Masters Thesis). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32247

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ip, David Tai Wai. “Correlates of Condom Use among Single, Sexually Active Ontario Adults: Data from the 1996/97 Ontario Health Survey.” 2012. Masters Thesis, University of Toronto. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32247.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ip, David Tai Wai. “Correlates of Condom Use among Single, Sexually Active Ontario Adults: Data from the 1996/97 Ontario Health Survey.” 2012. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Ip DTW. Correlates of Condom Use among Single, Sexually Active Ontario Adults: Data from the 1996/97 Ontario Health Survey. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Toronto; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32247.

Council of Science Editors:

Ip DTW. Correlates of Condom Use among Single, Sexually Active Ontario Adults: Data from the 1996/97 Ontario Health Survey. [Masters Thesis]. University of Toronto; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/32247

2. Daftary, Amrita. Integrating Patients into Integrated Healthcare: Perspectives from Individuals Coinfected with Tuberculosis and HIV.

Degree: 2012, University of Toronto

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) and human-immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are intertwined through complex biological and social pathways that affect over one million people worldwide. Mitigation of the co-epidemic is undermined by a failure to integrate TB and HIV healthcare services as a result of critical clinical, operational and social challenges. The social challenges of TB/HIV coinfection and integrated care are least understood. Objectives: This research examines the social contexts of TB/HIV illness and related healthcare from the perspective of patients coinfected with TB and HIV. Methods: The study was set within a constructivist-interpretivist theoretical framework. Non-participant field observations and semi-structured in-depth interviews were held with 40 coinfected adults (24 women, 16 men) and 8 healthcare workers at 3 ambulatory clinics in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, providing varying models of TB and HIV care. Subjective meanings of illness and healthcare were analyzed in relation to patients’ social contexts. Findings and Interpretations: Coinfection exposes patients to a double and unequal form of social stigma around TB and HIV. Affected individuals construct dual identities and negotiate selective disclosure of TB over HIV in order to manage this double stigma. Their experiences with stigma are bound by social, structural and gendered inequalities, and mediate their decisions to disclose, access and adhere to medical care. Coinfection also exposes patients to pluralistic, disparate and fragmented forms of healthcare delivery. Experiences with stigma and with distinct cultures of TB and HIV care affect their decisions for integrated healthcare. While integration may allow for some technical and clinical efficiency, it may also heighten some patients’ social burden of illness as a result of HIV disclosure and stigmatization. Conclusion: Integration efforts should consider the social contexts of TB/HIV coinfection, social consequences of patients’ health decisions, and paradigms within which such efforts are set in the design and execution of successful interventions.

PhD

Advisors/Committee Members: Calzavara, Liviana, Dalla Lana School of Public Health.

Subjects/Keywords: tuberculosis; HIV; coinfection; qualitative methods; service integration; patient perspectives; 0573

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Daftary, A. (2012). Integrating Patients into Integrated Healthcare: Perspectives from Individuals Coinfected with Tuberculosis and HIV. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33881

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Daftary, Amrita. “Integrating Patients into Integrated Healthcare: Perspectives from Individuals Coinfected with Tuberculosis and HIV.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33881.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Daftary, Amrita. “Integrating Patients into Integrated Healthcare: Perspectives from Individuals Coinfected with Tuberculosis and HIV.” 2012. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Daftary A. Integrating Patients into Integrated Healthcare: Perspectives from Individuals Coinfected with Tuberculosis and HIV. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2012. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33881.

Council of Science Editors:

Daftary A. Integrating Patients into Integrated Healthcare: Perspectives from Individuals Coinfected with Tuberculosis and HIV. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/33881

3. Kouyoumdjian, Fiona G. Intimate Partner Violence as a Risk Factor for Incident HIV Infection in Women in Rakai, Uganda.

Degree: 2014, University of Toronto

Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significant public health problem, which has been associated with HIV infection. Previous studies that assessed IPV and HIV have been limited. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to quantify the association between IPV and incident HIV infection in women in Rakai, Uganda. Secondary objectives were to explore whether condom use and number of partners in the past year mediate this association, and to identify risk factors for IPV. Methods: Data were collected over seven rounds of the Rakai Community Cohort Study between 2000 and 2009. Sexually active women aged 15 to 49 were included in analyses. Longitudinal data analysis was used to quantify the association between IPV and incident HIV infection, modelling participants as random effects. The adjusted population attributable risk fraction was calculated using an adjusted relative risk from a Poisson model. Putative mediators were assessed using Baron and Kenny’s criteria and the Sobel-Goodman test. Longitudinal and non-longitudinal analyses were used to assess predictors of IPV. Results: Women who experienced IPV ever had an odds ratio of incident HIV infection of 1.54 (95% CI 1.14, 2.09, p value 0.01), compared with women who had never experienced IPV. The adjusted population attributable risk fraction of incident HIV during the study period attributable to IPV ever was 14.3% (95% CI 2.8, 23.6). There was no evidence that condom use or partner violence in the past year mediated the relationship between IPV and HIV. Risk factors for IPV included sexual abuse, younger age at first sex, lower levels of education, forced first sex, younger age, being married, relationship of shorter duration, alcohol use by women and by their partners, and thinking that violence is acceptable. Discussion: This study demonstrates that IPV is associated with incident HIV infection in a population-based cohort in Uganda, although the population attributable risk fraction was modest. The prevention of IPV both in early sexual experiences and in adulthood should be a public health priority, and could contribute to HIV prevention. Further research is needed to understand the pathway from IPV to HIV infection.

PhD

Advisors/Committee Members: Calzavara, Liviana, Dalla Lana School of Public Health.

Subjects/Keywords: 0766

…131 xi List of Appendices Appendix 1. University of Toronto Research Ethics Board… …Approval, 2010.............................150 Appendix 2. University of Toronto Research Ethics… …4. Obtaining Research Ethics Board approval at the University of Toronto; 5. Defining and… …the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, a list and definition of variables included… …was obtained from the HIV Research Ethics Board at the University of Toronto in July 2010… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kouyoumdjian, F. G. (2014). Intimate Partner Violence as a Risk Factor for Incident HIV Infection in Women in Rakai, Uganda. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Toronto. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1807/65772

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kouyoumdjian, Fiona G. “Intimate Partner Violence as a Risk Factor for Incident HIV Infection in Women in Rakai, Uganda.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Toronto. Accessed February 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1807/65772.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kouyoumdjian, Fiona G. “Intimate Partner Violence as a Risk Factor for Incident HIV Infection in Women in Rakai, Uganda.” 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Kouyoumdjian FG. Intimate Partner Violence as a Risk Factor for Incident HIV Infection in Women in Rakai, Uganda. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/65772.

Council of Science Editors:

Kouyoumdjian FG. Intimate Partner Violence as a Risk Factor for Incident HIV Infection in Women in Rakai, Uganda. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Toronto; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1807/65772

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