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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Ward, Adrian F."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. -9749-3507. Essays on subprime lending, present bias, and risk salience.

Degree: Economics, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

In chapter 1, I examine the consequences of a policy change in Rhode Island that lowered the cap on payday loan fees (interest rates) from 15% of the principal to 10%. I use a difference-in-difference framework and a unique proprietary dataset of payday loan transactions to estimate the impact on market outcomes. I find that the lenders always charge the prevailing cap, creating a strong first stage. I also find that demand for payday loans increases both at the extensive and intensive margins. I show that debt cycles become longer and more likely to end with default. Moreover, I find that no lenders exit the market after the policy change, implying that they had substantial market power. The increase in affordability of the loans increases consumer surplus by about 44%. Many consumer rights advocates believe that subprime consumers tend to be time-inconsistent. With this assumption, welfare implications of a fee cap are not straightforward, because the gain from higher affordability can be dominated by the loss from amplified time-inconsistent behavior. To address this issue, in chapter 2 I develop a dynamic model of payday loan usage with naïve hyperbolic discounting. I calibrate the model in such a way that the simulated means are as close as possible to empirical means for Rhode Island under both regulation regimes (10% and 15% fees). Using simulations of the model, I show that a tighter fee cap is welfare-improving for all consumers, regardless of their degree of time-inconsistency. Furthermore, I find that a ban is more beneficial than a fee cap to highly time-inconsistent consumers but harms time-consistent consumers. In chapter 3, I examine whether earthquake risk salience increases in an area in response to the news of earthquakes in other parts of the world. Using 20 years of housing and earthquake data, I show that disastrous earthquakes happening in other parts of the world decrease home prices in high-risk zip codes relative to low-risk zip codes. Moreover, I find that higher casualties are associated with higher price effects. I also show that the price effects decay after one month. Advisors/Committee Members: Geruso, Michael (advisor), Abrevaya, Jason (committee member), Oettinger, Gerald S. (committee member), Ward, Adrian F. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Subprime credit market; Payday loans; Interest rate ceiling; Consumer welfare; Hyperbolic discounting; Natural Disasters; Earthquakes; Risk salience; Housing market; Affective reaction

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-9749-3507. (2017). Essays on subprime lending, present bias, and risk salience. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/47165

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-9749-3507. “Essays on subprime lending, present bias, and risk salience.” 2017. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed June 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/47165.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-9749-3507. “Essays on subprime lending, present bias, and risk salience.” 2017. Web. 26 Jun 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-9749-3507. Essays on subprime lending, present bias, and risk salience. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/47165.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

-9749-3507. Essays on subprime lending, present bias, and risk salience. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/47165

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Texas – Austin

2. Jang, Hyunkyu. Answering for yourself versus others : direct versus indirect estimates of charitable donations.

Degree: Marketing, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

It is common for researchers in marketing and other social sciences interested in ethical behavior such as propensity to donate to a charity to ask “indirect” questions about others (e.g., “what would another student donate?”) in order to measure respondents’ own propensity to donate. The idea is that people project their own desires onto their responses about others and that they are more likely to admit a lower level of generosity when they are under the lessened social pressure of the indirect question. In these four studies, we measure estimates respondents make about self (self-estimates) and others (other-estimates) as well as their actual donations to charity, doing so at an individual level to challenge the prevailing wisdom that indirect responses are more accurate and useful for research than direct responses. I conceptualize accuracy in terms of both the mean and correlations. I show that although mean-level results sometimes show other-estimates to be closer to actual behavior, they are not consistently so, and explain this inconsistency; and further, that correlations show self-estimates to always better reflect actual donations than other-estimates. These results support the use of self-estimates in the ethical domain and argue against the existence of projection in marketing research donation responses. Advisors/Committee Members: Irwin, Julie R. (advisor), Raghunathan, Rajagopal (committee member), Henderson, Ty (committee member), Ward, Adrian F. (committee member), Richter, Brian (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Donation behavior; Indirect questioning; Projection theory; Projective technique method; Pro-social behavior; Norm of self-interest

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jang, H. (2017). Answering for yourself versus others : direct versus indirect estimates of charitable donations. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63029

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jang, Hyunkyu. “Answering for yourself versus others : direct versus indirect estimates of charitable donations.” 2017. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed June 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63029.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jang, Hyunkyu. “Answering for yourself versus others : direct versus indirect estimates of charitable donations.” 2017. Web. 26 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Jang H. Answering for yourself versus others : direct versus indirect estimates of charitable donations. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Jun 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63029.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jang H. Answering for yourself versus others : direct versus indirect estimates of charitable donations. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63029

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Texas – Austin

3. Han, Jerry Jisang. The role of perceived control on consumer evaluations.

Degree: Marketing, 2018, University of Texas – Austin

Modern consumers often have experiences where they feel they have the ability to attain desired outcomes in life, whereas sometimes they feel they lack such abilities. Although preliminary work shows that these experiences of high or low control can influence how consumers make choices, the literature lacks an understanding on how feelings of control can impact the evaluation of consumer decision input variables. My dissertation contributes to this area of research by investigating how perceptions of control influence two important consumer decision input variables: the perceived distance towards spatial or temporal targets and the perceived value of one’s time or money resource. In my first essay, I start out by highlighting a seeming discrepancy in the literature. Specifically, prior research has found that people perceive positive objects and locations as physically closer than negative ones. Yet other work has found the opposite to be true for perceptions of temporal distance, where negative future events feel closer than positive ones. Motivated by this seeming discrepancy, I propose that (1) feelings of control can differentially influence how far away valenced (i.e. positive or negative) targets feel in space and time and that (2) the difference in perceived control over space versus time can account for these opposite findings. I provide empirical support for these claims across six studies and one single-paper meta-analysis. In my second essay, I propose that incidental feelings of low (vs. high) control can affect the perceived instrumentality of consumers’ time and money resources. I build these hypotheses based on the literature on control threat and consumer resources. Across five studies, I find that feeling low (vs. high) control heightens people’s perceived instrumentality of time, whereas it decreases their perceived instrumentality of money. Moreover, I further show that this differential effect of control on time vs. money is driven by differences in the perceived self-relevance of the resource. Additionally, two studies explore how such resource evaluations go onto influence consumer spending decisions and consumer satisfaction. The findings contribute to the literature on control threat and resource perceptions while providing insight into how consumers view their resources and spend them. Advisors/Committee Members: Gershoff, Andrew David, 1966- (advisor), Broniarczyk, Susan M (committee member), Irwin, Julie R (committee member), Ward, Adrian F (committee member), Samper, Adriana (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Perceived control; Physical distance; Temporal distance; Time; Money; Consumer resources

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Han, J. J. (2018). The role of perceived control on consumer evaluations. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68743

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Han, Jerry Jisang. “The role of perceived control on consumer evaluations.” 2018. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed June 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68743.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Han, Jerry Jisang. “The role of perceived control on consumer evaluations.” 2018. Web. 26 Jun 2019.

Vancouver:

Han JJ. The role of perceived control on consumer evaluations. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. [cited 2019 Jun 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68743.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Han JJ. The role of perceived control on consumer evaluations. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68743

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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