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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Treisman, Philip U."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. -4364-8184. Teaching Texas : race, disability, and the history of the school-to-prison pipeline.

Degree: PhD, American Studies, 2016, University of Texas – Austin

This dissertation presents a genealogical excavation of the contemporary school-to-prison pipeline, arguing that today’s pipeline has deep roots in America’s historic inequities. The phrase “school-to-prison pipeline” refers to practices that criminalize rather than educate particular students: high-stakes testing, zero-tolerance disciplinary policies, and police presence in schools. The pipeline disproportionately impacts students of color and students with disabilities. Furthermore, students of color are disproportionately labeled disabled, positioning students of color as doubly vulnerable to discretionary discipline. This dissertation calls for further attention to this intersection between race, disability, and punishment—and between critical disability studies and critical race studies—by examining the extent to which disability constitutes a racial project. This project employs the concept of debility to describe how populations may be marked as subject to injury or vulnerable to violence and argues for differentiating disability from debility in order to illuminate the extent to which disability constitutes a racial project. Both race and ability categories hinge on notions of fitness for and assimilability towards citizenship and both require constant renegotiation and reinforcement to maintain their salience. This dissertation focuses on Texas and begins by examining the solidification of education in the state, in conjunction with the eugenicist thought and scientific racism underlying both race and ability categories. The project further examines the diffuse set of responses that perpetuate the debilitation of non-white students in the face of challenges to racial and ability segregation. In particular the ongoing redefinition of special education categories that occurs concurrently with demise of legal racial segregation provides a mechanism for continuing the segregation of students of color. Schools’ explicit and implicit punishment of students provides a key mechanism for reinforcing and perpetuating ongoing debilitation. Debilitated students are disproportionately punished, and at times the punishment itself is disabling. Finally, this dissertation argues that the historical double debilitation of students of color undergirds today’s school-to-prison pipeline, which is made possible by the solidification of the contemporary prison industrial complex. Advisors/Committee Members: Thompson, Shirley Elizabeth (advisor), Browne, Simone A. (committee member), Marshall, Stephen H. (committee member), Treisman, Philip U. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Education; Race; Disability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-4364-8184. (2016). Teaching Texas : race, disability, and the history of the school-to-prison pipeline. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68301

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Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-4364-8184. “Teaching Texas : race, disability, and the history of the school-to-prison pipeline.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed December 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68301.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-4364-8184. “Teaching Texas : race, disability, and the history of the school-to-prison pipeline.” 2016. Web. 16 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-4364-8184. Teaching Texas : race, disability, and the history of the school-to-prison pipeline. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68301.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-4364-8184. Teaching Texas : race, disability, and the history of the school-to-prison pipeline. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68301

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


University of Texas – Austin

2. -8561-1948. Different shades of working-class : examining Latino/a parents’ decision-making processes regarding enrollment in a parent academy.

Degree: PhD, Educational Administration, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

Schools continue to struggle with increasing parental engagement with families of color from low and working-class backgrounds. Research has found that by building parents’ capacity to effectively navigate school systems and advocate for their children, parents can increase their participation in school-related activities. Yet, scant research has examined the decision-making processes of working-class Latino/a parents when reconciling whether to participate or not in school-sponsored engagement programs. More research is needed to explore the reasons for parent engagement differences among Latino/a parents who belong to the same low-income SES. As such, the purpose of this study is to examine the factors that contribute to working-class Latino/a parents enrolling into a nationally recognized parent academy in a high-poverty, majority Latino/a school district located in South Texas along the U.S.-Mexico border. Using concepts from Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler’s parental involvement model and community cultural wealth to guide the analysis, this study will examine three categories of parents in this district: parents who graduated from the academy, parents who did not graduate, and parents who chose not to enroll in the academy. Using a case study design, I interviewed 36 parents (N=36), including 12 parents from each category, as well as collected document and archival data. This study’s findings highlight the existence of different dimensions of working-class parents. Not all Latino/a working-class parents are the same. That is, not every parent who fits this description shares the same background or experiences. In the United States, these parents might be grouped in the same category, but some of them come to the program with varying degrees of privilege, most notably in regards to education and family supports. The parents in this study with the most privilege were mainly in Group1, parents who graduated from the program. Districts need to be aware of these privilege differences and recognize how they impact participation. It is necessary in order to avoid forming deficit assumptions of certain subgroups of parents and recognize that some parents have more constraints on their decisions than others. Therefore, districts must think about ways to address the diverse experiences and backgrounds of working-class Latino/a parents in order to avoid creating parental programs that are only engagement in name but involvement in practice. Advisors/Committee Members: Green, Terrance L. (advisor), Holme, Jennifer J. (committee member), Reyes, Pedro (committee member), Treisman, Philip U. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Latino/a parents; Working-class; Parental engagement; Decision-making

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-8561-1948. (2017). Different shades of working-class : examining Latino/a parents’ decision-making processes regarding enrollment in a parent academy. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68198

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-8561-1948. “Different shades of working-class : examining Latino/a parents’ decision-making processes regarding enrollment in a parent academy.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed December 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68198.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-8561-1948. “Different shades of working-class : examining Latino/a parents’ decision-making processes regarding enrollment in a parent academy.” 2017. Web. 16 Dec 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-8561-1948. Different shades of working-class : examining Latino/a parents’ decision-making processes regarding enrollment in a parent academy. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Dec 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68198.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-8561-1948. Different shades of working-class : examining Latino/a parents’ decision-making processes regarding enrollment in a parent academy. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68198

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

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