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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Toste, Jessica R."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Yang, Man. The effect of grade retention on academic and social-behavioral outcomes for students with disabilities in elementary grades.

Degree: PhD, Special Education, 2019, University of Texas – Austin

There is a lack of research examining the rates and effect of grade retention, a widely used intervention at schools, among students with disabilities. The existing research evidence of retention effects among students without disabilities remains inconclusive, which might result from the differences in analytical methodologies, sample selections and measurement errors. The purpose of the present study was to examine the retention rates, academic and behavioral trajectories of retained versus promoted students with disabilities, and the effect of grade retention for students with disabilities using the nationally representative Special Education Elementary Longitudinal Study (SEELS) dataset. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) was conducted to investigate the trajectories of being retained at three different time points (kindergarten, first and second grade) on later academic and social development trajectories among students with disabilities (N = 13,176). Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to infer causal inferences by creating two equivalent groups matched on a set of baseline measures. Results indicated that retention rates for students with disabilities are much higher than that for students without disabilities reported in previous studies. In addition, retention rates differ, albeit slightly, by student demographic characteristics such as race, gender, EL status, family income and disability types. Retained students with disabilities do not differ significantly from their promoted peers in terms of academic and behavioral trajectories with an exception of mathematics at kindergarten. The analysis of propensity score matching indicated that there is no effect of grade retention on reading performances but retention results in significant worse math performances for students with disabilities. Advisors/Committee Members: Cooc, North (advisor), Barnes, Marcia (committee member), Park, Soyoung (committee member), Toste, Jessica R (committee member), Pustejovsky, James E (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Special education; Grade retention

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Yang, M. (2019). The effect of grade retention on academic and social-behavioral outcomes for students with disabilities in elementary grades. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/1477

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Yang, Man. “The effect of grade retention on academic and social-behavioral outcomes for students with disabilities in elementary grades.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/1477.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Yang, Man. “The effect of grade retention on academic and social-behavioral outcomes for students with disabilities in elementary grades.” 2019. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Yang M. The effect of grade retention on academic and social-behavioral outcomes for students with disabilities in elementary grades. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/1477.

Council of Science Editors:

Yang M. The effect of grade retention on academic and social-behavioral outcomes for students with disabilities in elementary grades. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/1477


University of Texas – Austin

2. McCulley, Elisabeth Vanessa. Listening comprehension and language as scaffolds for reading comprehension with secondary struggling readers.

Degree: PhD, Special Education, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

This experimental study examined the effects of a reading intervention using listening comprehension and oral language as scaffolds to improve reading comprehension of middle school students with reading difficulties. The study included students in 6th-8th grade randomly assigned to a reading intervention treatment or a no treatment comparison condition. Treatment students received 45-minute sessions daily for a total of 33 sessions. Reading comprehension measures included the Woodcock Johnson Passage Comprehension subtest, State of Texas Assessment of Academic Readiness reading, and an unstandardized curriculum-based measure of summarization. Measures of inference-making included the Test of Language Competence Listening Comprehension: Making Inferences subtest and an unstandardized curriculum-based measure of inference skills. Language abilities were assessed using the Woodcock Johnston Oral Comprehension subtest, and the Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals Formulated Sentences and Recalling Sentences subtests. An unstandardized vocabulary measure assessed student recall of vocabulary words. ANCOVAs were used to estimate the treatment effects for each dependent variable using pretest scores as a covariate. The Kauffman Brief Intelligence Test II Verbal Knowledge subtest served as covariate for the unstandardized vocabulary measure. Results yielded no statistically significant effects on reading comprehension, language, or inference measures. Effects, which were calculated with Cohen’s d, ranged from .00 to .78, with eight of nine measures favoring treatment. Findings from an unstandardized vocabulary measure indicated a statistically significant difference in favor of the treatment group. Results suggest that using oral language and listening comprehension to support reading practices of middle school students with reading comprehension difficulties may be a viable treatment for improving reading comprehension and improving content-specific vocabulary knowledge. Advisors/Committee Members: Vaughn, Sharon, 1952- (advisor), Bryant, Diane P. (committee member), Barnes, Marcia (committee member), Beretvas, Susan N. (committee member), Toste, Jessica R. (committee member), Cable, Amory L. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Reading comprehension; Language; Struggling readers; Intervention

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCulley, E. V. (2015). Listening comprehension and language as scaffolds for reading comprehension with secondary struggling readers. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31692

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCulley, Elisabeth Vanessa. “Listening comprehension and language as scaffolds for reading comprehension with secondary struggling readers.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31692.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCulley, Elisabeth Vanessa. “Listening comprehension and language as scaffolds for reading comprehension with secondary struggling readers.” 2015. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

McCulley EV. Listening comprehension and language as scaffolds for reading comprehension with secondary struggling readers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31692.

Council of Science Editors:

McCulley EV. Listening comprehension and language as scaffolds for reading comprehension with secondary struggling readers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31692


University of Texas – Austin

3. Kang, Eun Young, Ph. D. The contribution of reading fluency and decoding on reading comprehension and the relation between reading fluency and writing fluency in upper elementary grades.

Degree: PhD, Special Education, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

Reading comprehension is considered to consist of decoding and linguistic comprehension. However, some researchers have argued that a third component should be considered – reading fluency. Although reading fluency is an important component of reading comprehension, little evidence indicates how much variance in reading comprehension can be explained by reading fluency, or how much the difference in degree of variance is rooted in test format differences. Therefore, the goal of this study is to identify how reading fluency predicts reading comprehension using a multiple linear regression model for fourth and fifth graders. In addition, writing fluency may correlate with reading fluency, as reading and writing moderately correlate with each other. However, few studies have examined these assumptions. This study addresses the following research questions: 1. How do reading fluency and decoding contribute to reading comprehension in the upper elementary grades? Do the contributions of reading fluency and decoding differ depending on how reading comprehension is measured? 2. What is the relation between reading fluency and writing fluency in the upper elementary grades? Results indicate that reading fluency and decoding predict 40.4% to 57.4% of the variance of reading comprehension, regardless of how reading comprehension is measured. Specifically, reading fluency contributed 31.7% of the variance associated with the Gates-MacGinitie, 35.7% associated with the TOSREC, and 40.8% associated with WJ3 Passage Comprehension. An additional 8.9%, 8.3%, and 16.6% of variance for the Gates-MacGinitie, TOSREC, and WJ3 Passage Comprehension, respectively, can be explained by decoding. According to the second set of hierarchical regressions, 37.1%, 39.2%, and 54.8% of the variance of the Gates-MacGinitie, TOSREC, and WJ-III Passage Comprehension, respectively, can be explained by decoding. When reading fluency was entered as a step 2, an additional 3.5%, 4.8%, and 2.6% of the variance for the Gates-MacGinitie, TOSREC, and WJ3 Passage Comprehension, respectively, is accounted for by reading fluency. With regard to the relation between reading fluency and writing fluency, statistically significant positive medium correlations with a range of .448 to .488 were found, which is aligned with the findings from previous studies. Advisors/Committee Members: Vaughn, Sharon, 1952- (advisor), Bryant, Diane P. (committee member), Barnes, Marcia (committee member), Toste, Jessica R. (committee member), Keith, Timothy Z. (committee member), Roberts, Gregory J. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Reading fluency; Reading comprehension

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kang, Eun Young, P. D. (2015). The contribution of reading fluency and decoding on reading comprehension and the relation between reading fluency and writing fluency in upper elementary grades. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31621

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kang, Eun Young, Ph D. “The contribution of reading fluency and decoding on reading comprehension and the relation between reading fluency and writing fluency in upper elementary grades.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed November 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31621.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kang, Eun Young, Ph D. “The contribution of reading fluency and decoding on reading comprehension and the relation between reading fluency and writing fluency in upper elementary grades.” 2015. Web. 19 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Kang, Eun Young PD. The contribution of reading fluency and decoding on reading comprehension and the relation between reading fluency and writing fluency in upper elementary grades. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31621.

Council of Science Editors:

Kang, Eun Young PD. The contribution of reading fluency and decoding on reading comprehension and the relation between reading fluency and writing fluency in upper elementary grades. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31621

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