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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Stone, Peter H"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. -8073-3276. Parameterized modular inverse reinforcement learning.

Degree: MSin Computer Sciences, Computer Science, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

Reinforcement learning and inverse reinforcement learning can be used to model and understand human behaviors. However, due to the curse of dimensionality, their use as a model for human behavior has been limited. Inspired by observed natural behaviors, one approach is to decompose complex tasks into independent sub-tasks, or modules. Using this approach, we extended earlier work on modular inverse reinforcement learning, and developed what we called a parameterized modular inverse reinforcement learning algorithm. We first demonstrate the correctness and efficiency of our algorithm in a simulated navigation task. We then show that our algorithm is able to estimate a reward function and discount factor for real human navigation behaviors in a virtual environment, and train an agent that imitates the behavior of human subjects. Advisors/Committee Members: Ballard, Dana H. (Dana Harry), 1946- (advisor), Stone, Peter H (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Reinforcement learning; Artificial intelligence; Inverse reinforcement learning; Modular inverse reinforcement learning; Reinforcement learning algorithms; Human navigation behaviors

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-8073-3276. (2015). Parameterized modular inverse reinforcement learning. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46987

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-8073-3276. “Parameterized modular inverse reinforcement learning.” 2015. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46987.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-8073-3276. “Parameterized modular inverse reinforcement learning.” 2015. Web. 25 Oct 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-8073-3276. Parameterized modular inverse reinforcement learning. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46987.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-8073-3276. Parameterized modular inverse reinforcement learning. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46987

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


University of Texas – Austin

2. Lopez-Mobilia, Gabriel. Children’s psychological and moral attributions to a humanoid robot.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

In the near future, sophisticated social robots will become increasingly interwoven into our lives. Researchers have recently begun to examine people’s anthropomorphic conceptions of such robots, and a few have stressed the unique consequences that these technological agents may have for the psychological development of children developing around them. In the current set of studies, children were introduced to a humanoid robot, “Robbie the Robot.” Across the two studies, participants witnessed Robbie perform a harmful action, destroying a block tower that a child had purportedly built and was saving for later. Of primary interest in these two studies was whether children would hold Robbie the Robot morally accountable for the destructive act. It was predicted that judgments of moral accountability would depend on several different factors: whether the robot appeared to initiate its own actions, the age of the participant, and whether children attributed psychological properties, specifically intentional agency, to the robot. In Study 1, children were assigned to one of two experimental conditions: a controlled condition in which a confederate appeared to control the robot’s actions with a device that was tethered to the robot, and an autonomous condition in which the robot appeared to move of its own accord. Results revealed that children were significantly more likely to attribute psychological properties to the robot in the autonomous condition compared to the controlled condition. Compared to 7-year-olds, 5-year-olds were more likely to attribute psychological properties to the robot overall. In addition, results indicated that increasing cues to the robot’s autonomy indirectly affected moral accountability judgments through an increase in children’s attributions of intentions. Study 2 tested the hypothesis that children’s attributions of psychological agency, but not psychological experience, would increase after watching the robot commit a moral act. Overall, Study 2 results did not support this prediction, but key results from the first study were replicated and elucidated by the inclusion of a wider array of psychological properties as well as a measure of children’s judgments of the robot’s cuteness. Implications are discussed for human interaction with social robots and other rapidly evolving technologies, such as autonomous vehicles. Advisors/Committee Members: Woolley, Jacqueline D. (advisor), Echols, Catherine H (committee member), Markman, Arthur B (committee member), Reeves, Lauretta (committee member), Stone, Peter H (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cognitive development; Anthropomorphism; Robots

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Lopez-Mobilia, G. (2015). Children’s psychological and moral attributions to a humanoid robot. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32591

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lopez-Mobilia, Gabriel. “Children’s psychological and moral attributions to a humanoid robot.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 25, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32591.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lopez-Mobilia, Gabriel. “Children’s psychological and moral attributions to a humanoid robot.” 2015. Web. 25 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Lopez-Mobilia G. Children’s psychological and moral attributions to a humanoid robot. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2020 Oct 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32591.

Council of Science Editors:

Lopez-Mobilia G. Children’s psychological and moral attributions to a humanoid robot. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32591

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