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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Steinhardt, Mary A"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. -2792-1494. The efficacy of swimming and cycling training in individuals with osteoarthritis : a randomized controlled clinical trial.

Degree: PhD, Kinesiology, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the number one cause of disability among older adults and is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) due, at least in part, to sedentary lifestyle in OA. Symptoms of OA such as joint pain act as a significant barrier for middle-aged and older adults attempting to perform physical activity. Thus, swimming can be an ideal form of exercise for patients with OA as it is non-weight bearing and would not aggravate symptoms of OA. However, there is no information available regarding the beneficial effects of regular swimming exercise involving patients with OA. Accordingly, the general aim of the present study was to determine the effects of a 12-week swimming exercise intervention on functional capacity, pain, vascular function, and markers of inflammation in middle-aged and older adults with OA. Using a controlled, randomized study design, forty-eight sedentary middle-aged and older adults with OA underwent 12 weeks of either swimming or cycling exercise training. Cycling exercise was used as a land-based exercise comparison group. All exercise sessions were closely supervised and consisted of 45 minutes/session 3 days/week at 60-70% heart rate reserve. In Study 1, we assessed changes in functional outcomes and pain. Participants in both swimming and cycling exercise training groups demonstrated significant increases in distance covered during the 6-min walk test, as well as maximal grip strength and isokinetic knee extensor and flexor strength. We observed decreases in body mass, visceral adiposity, and waist and hip circumference in both exercise training groups. Additionally, there were reductions in pain and stiffness accompanied by increased physical function, as determined by the WOMAC index, in both groups. It should be noted, there was no advantage in the swimming or cycling group in any of these measurements. In Study 2, we investigated improvements in vascular function and markers of inflammation. We observed significant reductions in central artery stiffness following both exercise interventions, and the arterial destiffening effects were observed all across various measures of arterial stiffness. A significant improvement in endothelium-dependent vasodilation, as determined by brachial flow-mediated dilation, was observed after the swimming, but not after the cycling exercise training. Furthermore, both exercise training groups significantly decreased levels of the inflammatory marker, IL-6. Taken together, results suggest that swimming exercise was effective in improving physical function and vascular function as well as in reducing pain in middle-aged and older adults with OA. These findings are of paramount clinical importance to patients with OA, as swimming may be a desirable mode of exercise, but is often viewed as inferior to land-based exercise in regards to maximizing health benefits gained from exercise. Advisors/Committee Members: Tanaka, Hirofumi, Ph. D. (advisor), Stuifbergen, Alexa M (committee member), Kohl, Harold W (committee member), Steinhardt, Mary A (committee member), Brothers, Matthew R (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Osteoarthritis; Exercise

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-2792-1494. (2015). The efficacy of swimming and cycling training in individuals with osteoarthritis : a randomized controlled clinical trial. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31472

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Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-2792-1494. “The efficacy of swimming and cycling training in individuals with osteoarthritis : a randomized controlled clinical trial.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed June 02, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31472.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-2792-1494. “The efficacy of swimming and cycling training in individuals with osteoarthritis : a randomized controlled clinical trial.” 2015. Web. 02 Jun 2020.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-2792-1494. The efficacy of swimming and cycling training in individuals with osteoarthritis : a randomized controlled clinical trial. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2020 Jun 02]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31472.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-2792-1494. The efficacy of swimming and cycling training in individuals with osteoarthritis : a randomized controlled clinical trial. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31472

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

2. Dearman, Jeremy Keith. Increasing college students’ experience of flow while completing academic writing tasks.

Degree: PhD, Educational Psychology, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

Flow is a state of consciousness where the individual experiences engagement, concentration, and enjoyment. An intervention was conducted focusing on challenge-skill balancing and intrinsic motivation, both previously conceptualized as aspects of flow. The variables evaluated were challenge-skill balance, concentration on task, flow, and intrinsic motivation. The study had 211 undergraduate college students (control = 104, intervention = 107). Repeated measures ANOVA was used to evaluate the data. The findings were mixed. Significant main effects between groups were not found. Significant main effects for time (pre-test to post-test) were found for challenge-skill balance, flow, and intrinsic motivation. A statistically significant change from pre-test to post-test for the control group on intrinsic motivation suggests the possible presence of a confounding effect by the control group curriculum. Some evidence was found that flow can be influenced by direct intervention. Further research is needed to clarify, evaluate, and extend these findings. Advisors/Committee Members: Schallert, Diane L. (advisor), Weinstein, Claire E. (advisor), Patall, Erika A. (committee member), Pituch, Keenan A (committee member), Steinhardt, Mary A (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Flow; Challenge-skill balance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dearman, J. K. (2015). Increasing college students’ experience of flow while completing academic writing tasks. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31013

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dearman, Jeremy Keith. “Increasing college students’ experience of flow while completing academic writing tasks.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed June 02, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31013.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dearman, Jeremy Keith. “Increasing college students’ experience of flow while completing academic writing tasks.” 2015. Web. 02 Jun 2020.

Vancouver:

Dearman JK. Increasing college students’ experience of flow while completing academic writing tasks. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2020 Jun 02]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31013.

Council of Science Editors:

Dearman JK. Increasing college students’ experience of flow while completing academic writing tasks. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31013

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