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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Stachowiak, Jeanne"). Showing records 1 – 16 of 16 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Mayes, Sarah Margaret. Hyaluronic acid and alginate blend hydrogel films for the prevention of postsurgical adhesions.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2013, University of Texas – Austin

 Postoperative adhesions form as the body's natural response to injury in an effort to temporarily protect and supply nutrients to these tissues. However, adhesions can… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Hyaluronic acid; Alginate; Abdominal adhesions

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APA (6th Edition):

Mayes, S. M. (2013). Hyaluronic acid and alginate blend hydrogel films for the prevention of postsurgical adhesions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/22058

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mayes, Sarah Margaret. “Hyaluronic acid and alginate blend hydrogel films for the prevention of postsurgical adhesions.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/22058.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mayes, Sarah Margaret. “Hyaluronic acid and alginate blend hydrogel films for the prevention of postsurgical adhesions.” 2013. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mayes SM. Hyaluronic acid and alginate blend hydrogel films for the prevention of postsurgical adhesions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/22058.

Council of Science Editors:

Mayes SM. Hyaluronic acid and alginate blend hydrogel films for the prevention of postsurgical adhesions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/22058


University of Texas – Austin

2. -7115-3061. Modeling RNA, protein, and synthetic molecules using coarse-grained and all-atom representations.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2016, University of Texas – Austin

 The aim of computational chemistry is to depict and understand the dynamics and interactions of molecular systems. In addition to increased comprehension in the physical… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: RNA structure; Coarse-grained model; RNA 3-D structure; RACER RNA model; Cucurbituril modeling; CdSe quantum dots; RNA free energy modeling; RNA physics based model

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APA (6th Edition):

-7115-3061. (2016). Modeling RNA, protein, and synthetic molecules using coarse-grained and all-atom representations. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/72699

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-7115-3061. “Modeling RNA, protein, and synthetic molecules using coarse-grained and all-atom representations.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/72699.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-7115-3061. “Modeling RNA, protein, and synthetic molecules using coarse-grained and all-atom representations.” 2016. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-7115-3061. Modeling RNA, protein, and synthetic molecules using coarse-grained and all-atom representations. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2016. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/72699.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-7115-3061. Modeling RNA, protein, and synthetic molecules using coarse-grained and all-atom representations. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/72699

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


University of Texas – Austin

3. -1407-1881. Pattern formation in cell-sized membranes.

Degree: PhD, Physics, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

 The research presented in this dissertation follows in the tradition of experimental membrane biophysics. Our goal is to study the physical mechanisms underlying organization in… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Lipid membranes; Giant unilamellar vesicles; Supported lipid membranes; Protein adhesion; Phase separation; Pattern formation; Pore formation

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APA (6th Edition):

-1407-1881. (2017). Pattern formation in cell-sized membranes. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63057

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-1407-1881. “Pattern formation in cell-sized membranes.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63057.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-1407-1881. “Pattern formation in cell-sized membranes.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-1407-1881. Pattern formation in cell-sized membranes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63057.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-1407-1881. Pattern formation in cell-sized membranes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63057

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


University of Texas – Austin

4. Geuss, Laura Roslye. Manipulation of the embryoid body microenvironment to increase cardiomyogenesis.

Degree: PhD, Cell and Molecular Biology, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

 Myocardial Infarction (MI) is one of the most prevalent and deadliest diseases in the United States. Since the host myocardium becomes irreversibly damaged following MI,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Embryonic stem cells; Cardiomyocyte; Mechanical stimulation; Biomaterials; Tissue engineering; Myocardial infarction

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APA (6th Edition):

Geuss, L. R. (2014). Manipulation of the embryoid body microenvironment to increase cardiomyogenesis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31295

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Geuss, Laura Roslye. “Manipulation of the embryoid body microenvironment to increase cardiomyogenesis.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31295.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Geuss, Laura Roslye. “Manipulation of the embryoid body microenvironment to increase cardiomyogenesis.” 2014. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Geuss LR. Manipulation of the embryoid body microenvironment to increase cardiomyogenesis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31295.

Council of Science Editors:

Geuss LR. Manipulation of the embryoid body microenvironment to increase cardiomyogenesis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31295


University of Texas – Austin

5. Eckes, Kevin Michael. Probing the effects of backbone ester substitution on self-assembly and biological activity of short depsipeptides.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

 Hydrogel materials composed of self-assembled amphiphilic peptides show great promise for use as injectable, highly biocompatible biomaterials for tissue regeneration applications. However, peptides do not… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Self-assembling biomaterials; Peptide self-assembly; Peptidomimetic materials; Depsipeptides

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APA (6th Edition):

Eckes, K. M. (2015). Probing the effects of backbone ester substitution on self-assembly and biological activity of short depsipeptides. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46551

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eckes, Kevin Michael. “Probing the effects of backbone ester substitution on self-assembly and biological activity of short depsipeptides.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46551.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eckes, Kevin Michael. “Probing the effects of backbone ester substitution on self-assembly and biological activity of short depsipeptides.” 2015. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Eckes KM. Probing the effects of backbone ester substitution on self-assembly and biological activity of short depsipeptides. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46551.

Council of Science Editors:

Eckes KM. Probing the effects of backbone ester substitution on self-assembly and biological activity of short depsipeptides. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46551


University of Texas – Austin

6. Mu, Xiaojia. Modeling the biomolecular self-assembly and interaction.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

 What materials designers most envy is nature’s building design. It has long been a dream for scientists to mimic and further engineer the behaviors, interactions,… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Simulation; Modeling

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APA (6th Edition):

Mu, X. (2014). Modeling the biomolecular self-assembly and interaction. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31288

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mu, Xiaojia. “Modeling the biomolecular self-assembly and interaction.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31288.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mu, Xiaojia. “Modeling the biomolecular self-assembly and interaction.” 2014. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Mu X. Modeling the biomolecular self-assembly and interaction. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31288.

Council of Science Editors:

Mu X. Modeling the biomolecular self-assembly and interaction. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31288


University of Texas – Austin

7. -9024-5383. Glypican-1 proteoliposomes enhance growth factor activity for therapeutic angiogenesis.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2018, University of Texas – Austin

 Peripheral arterial disease affects more than 27 million patients in the United States. PAD can lead to peripheral limb ischemia and result in non-healing foot… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Glypican-1; FGF-2; VEGF; Ischemia; Angiogenesis; Growth factor

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APA (6th Edition):

-9024-5383. (2018). Glypican-1 proteoliposomes enhance growth factor activity for therapeutic angiogenesis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68372

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-9024-5383. “Glypican-1 proteoliposomes enhance growth factor activity for therapeutic angiogenesis.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68372.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-9024-5383. “Glypican-1 proteoliposomes enhance growth factor activity for therapeutic angiogenesis.” 2018. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-9024-5383. Glypican-1 proteoliposomes enhance growth factor activity for therapeutic angiogenesis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68372.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-9024-5383. Glypican-1 proteoliposomes enhance growth factor activity for therapeutic angiogenesis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/68372

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

8. Keidel, Andrea. Exploiting high precision single particle diffusion measurements to probe cellular functions in vitro and in vivo.

Degree: PhD, Physics, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

 Diffusion plays an important role for many processes at the microscopic level in cells. In this dissertation we present two model systems in which we… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Diffusion; Membrane fusion; Cell freezing

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APA (6th Edition):

Keidel, A. (2014). Exploiting high precision single particle diffusion measurements to probe cellular functions in vitro and in vivo. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31398

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Keidel, Andrea. “Exploiting high precision single particle diffusion measurements to probe cellular functions in vitro and in vivo.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31398.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Keidel, Andrea. “Exploiting high precision single particle diffusion measurements to probe cellular functions in vitro and in vivo.” 2014. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Keidel A. Exploiting high precision single particle diffusion measurements to probe cellular functions in vitro and in vivo. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31398.

Council of Science Editors:

Keidel A. Exploiting high precision single particle diffusion measurements to probe cellular functions in vitro and in vivo. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31398


University of Texas – Austin

9. Gadok, Avinash Kaur. Overcoming the plasma membrane barrier to improve the efficiency of therapeutic delivery to the cellular cytoplasm.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

 Difficulties in controlling endocytosis limit the success of many nanoparticle-based drug delivery strategies. Therefore, there is a need to both (i) introduce new mechanisms of… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Cell-derived materials; Drug delivery; Clathrin; Endocytosis; Gap junctions; Connexins; Biomaterials

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APA (6th Edition):

Gadok, A. K. (2017). Overcoming the plasma membrane barrier to improve the efficiency of therapeutic delivery to the cellular cytoplasm. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/2264

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gadok, Avinash Kaur. “Overcoming the plasma membrane barrier to improve the efficiency of therapeutic delivery to the cellular cytoplasm.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/2264.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gadok, Avinash Kaur. “Overcoming the plasma membrane barrier to improve the efficiency of therapeutic delivery to the cellular cytoplasm.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Gadok AK. Overcoming the plasma membrane barrier to improve the efficiency of therapeutic delivery to the cellular cytoplasm. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/2264.

Council of Science Editors:

Gadok AK. Overcoming the plasma membrane barrier to improve the efficiency of therapeutic delivery to the cellular cytoplasm. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/2264


University of Texas – Austin

10. Puranik, Amey Shreekant. Intelligent nanoscale hydrogels for the oral delivery of hydrophobic therapeutics.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

 In this work, novel oral drug delivery formulations were developed for the administration of hydrophobic therapeutics, with the overarching goal of improving their solubility and… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Drug delivery; Nanoparticles; Nanotechnology; Polymers

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APA (6th Edition):

Puranik, A. S. (2015). Intelligent nanoscale hydrogels for the oral delivery of hydrophobic therapeutics. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46557

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Puranik, Amey Shreekant. “Intelligent nanoscale hydrogels for the oral delivery of hydrophobic therapeutics.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46557.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Puranik, Amey Shreekant. “Intelligent nanoscale hydrogels for the oral delivery of hydrophobic therapeutics.” 2015. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Puranik AS. Intelligent nanoscale hydrogels for the oral delivery of hydrophobic therapeutics. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46557.

Council of Science Editors:

Puranik AS. Intelligent nanoscale hydrogels for the oral delivery of hydrophobic therapeutics. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/46557


University of Texas – Austin

11. Das, Subhamoy. Syndesomes for enhanced wound healing and therapeutic angiogenesis in a diabetic diseased state.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

 Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) affects more than 202 million people globally and about 20% of the population above 65 years of age in the United… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Angiogenesis; Wound healing

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APA (6th Edition):

Das, S. (2014). Syndesomes for enhanced wound healing and therapeutic angiogenesis in a diabetic diseased state. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/44095

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Das, Subhamoy. “Syndesomes for enhanced wound healing and therapeutic angiogenesis in a diabetic diseased state.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/44095.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Das, Subhamoy. “Syndesomes for enhanced wound healing and therapeutic angiogenesis in a diabetic diseased state.” 2014. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Das S. Syndesomes for enhanced wound healing and therapeutic angiogenesis in a diabetic diseased state. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/44095.

Council of Science Editors:

Das S. Syndesomes for enhanced wound healing and therapeutic angiogenesis in a diabetic diseased state. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/44095


University of Texas – Austin

12. Butler, Mitchell Tyler. Mechanisms of planar cell polarity patterning by Prickle and Vangl and the control of collective cellular behaviors during tissue morphogenesis.

Degree: PhD, Cell and Molecular Biology, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

 Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling establishes asymmetric molecular patterns that control polarized cellular behaviors within the plane of a tissue or organ. This feature is… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Planar cell polarity

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APA (6th Edition):

Butler, M. T. (2017). Mechanisms of planar cell polarity patterning by Prickle and Vangl and the control of collective cellular behaviors during tissue morphogenesis. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/61784

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Butler, Mitchell Tyler. “Mechanisms of planar cell polarity patterning by Prickle and Vangl and the control of collective cellular behaviors during tissue morphogenesis.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/61784.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Butler, Mitchell Tyler. “Mechanisms of planar cell polarity patterning by Prickle and Vangl and the control of collective cellular behaviors during tissue morphogenesis.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Butler MT. Mechanisms of planar cell polarity patterning by Prickle and Vangl and the control of collective cellular behaviors during tissue morphogenesis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/61784.

Council of Science Editors:

Butler MT. Mechanisms of planar cell polarity patterning by Prickle and Vangl and the control of collective cellular behaviors during tissue morphogenesis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/61784

13. Liu, Cong, Ph. D. Single-molecule tracking and its application in biomolecular binding detection.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

 In the past two decades significant advances have been made in single-molecule detection, which enables the direct observation of single biomolecules at work in real… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Single-molecule detection; Fluorescence lifetime; Single-molecule tracking; Biomolecular binding detection; Single biomolecules

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APA (6th Edition):

Liu, Cong, P. D. (2017). Single-molecule tracking and its application in biomolecular binding detection. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/47332

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Cong, Ph D. “Single-molecule tracking and its application in biomolecular binding detection.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/47332.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Cong, Ph D. “Single-molecule tracking and its application in biomolecular binding detection.” 2017. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Liu, Cong PD. Single-molecule tracking and its application in biomolecular binding detection. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/47332.

Council of Science Editors:

Liu, Cong PD. Single-molecule tracking and its application in biomolecular binding detection. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/47332


University of Texas – Austin

14. Stowers, Ryan Scott. Dynamic photo-tunable hydrogels for temporal modulation of matrix mechanical properties.

Degree: PhD, Biomedical Engineering, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

 The extracellular matrix is highly influential in regulating cell fate and function in vivo. Biophysical cues from the microenvironment are involved in nearly every cellular… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Dynamic hydrogel; Microenvironment; Matrix mechanical properties

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APA (6th Edition):

Stowers, R. S. (2014). Dynamic photo-tunable hydrogels for temporal modulation of matrix mechanical properties. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32910

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stowers, Ryan Scott. “Dynamic photo-tunable hydrogels for temporal modulation of matrix mechanical properties.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32910.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stowers, Ryan Scott. “Dynamic photo-tunable hydrogels for temporal modulation of matrix mechanical properties.” 2014. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Stowers RS. Dynamic photo-tunable hydrogels for temporal modulation of matrix mechanical properties. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32910.

Council of Science Editors:

Stowers RS. Dynamic photo-tunable hydrogels for temporal modulation of matrix mechanical properties. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/32910


University of Texas – Austin

15. -0255-8318. Stimulus-responsive delivery systems for enabling the oral delivery of protein therapeutics exhibiting high isoelectric point.

Degree: PhD, Chemical Engineering, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

 Protein therapeutics offer numerous advantages over small molecule drugs and are rapidly becoming one of the most prominent classes of therapeutics. Unfortunately, they are delivered… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Hydrogels; Protein therapeutics; Protein therapy; Drug delivery; Oral delivery; Aptamers; PH-responsive; Stimulus-responsive; Ionic strength; Isoelectric point; PEGylation; Conjugation; Bioconjugation; Intestinal absorption; Intestinal transport; Itaconic acid; N-vinylpyrrolidone; Methacrylic acid; Mesh size; Crosslinking density; SELEX; In vivo; Closed-loop

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APA (6th Edition):

-0255-8318. (2015). Stimulus-responsive delivery systems for enabling the oral delivery of protein therapeutics exhibiting high isoelectric point. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/30484

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-0255-8318. “Stimulus-responsive delivery systems for enabling the oral delivery of protein therapeutics exhibiting high isoelectric point.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/30484.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-0255-8318. “Stimulus-responsive delivery systems for enabling the oral delivery of protein therapeutics exhibiting high isoelectric point.” 2015. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-0255-8318. Stimulus-responsive delivery systems for enabling the oral delivery of protein therapeutics exhibiting high isoelectric point. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/30484.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-0255-8318. Stimulus-responsive delivery systems for enabling the oral delivery of protein therapeutics exhibiting high isoelectric point. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/30484

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

16. Jurney, Patrick Levi. Nanoparticle margination, adhesion, and uptake in microflow.

Degree: PhD, Mechanical engineering, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

 Various nanoparticles have been investigated as drug carriers for delivery to diseased cells in the body. Targeted delivery of nanocarriers specifically to diseased cells can… (more)

Subjects/Keywords: Nanoparticle drug delivery; Microfluidics; Margination

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jurney, P. L. (2015). Nanoparticle margination, adhesion, and uptake in microflow. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/43948

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jurney, Patrick Levi. “Nanoparticle margination, adhesion, and uptake in microflow.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/43948.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jurney, Patrick Levi. “Nanoparticle margination, adhesion, and uptake in microflow.” 2015. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Jurney PL. Nanoparticle margination, adhesion, and uptake in microflow. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/43948.

Council of Science Editors:

Jurney PL. Nanoparticle margination, adhesion, and uptake in microflow. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/43948

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