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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Scott, Suzanne, 1979-"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Stickler, Toni Maria. Theater bootlegs : discourses on access and class in theater fandom.

Degree: MA, Radio-Television-Film, 2019, University of Texas – Austin

This thesis contributes to the growing field of theater audience studies by focusing on a particular theater fan practice: recording and watching bootlegs. While scholars have extensively researched bootlegs of music concerts, bootlegs of theater have not been studied even though they are a crucial aspect of the contemporary theater fandom experience. This is a significant gap in understanding how audiences relate to theater, especially because theater as a medium is relatively expensive and inaccessible. This thesis frames bootlegs as filling a demand for greater access to professional theater and considers the political ramifications of their circulation. To this end, I examine the construction of theater as a “high class” medium and how prioritizing the “liveness” of theater contributes to its exclusivity. I examine how these conceptions of theater permeate the discourses of theater producers and performers who condemn the recording of bootlegs. Finally, a survey of the community of theater bootleg traders illuminates the tensions that currently exist for bootleg traders as they attempt to circulate bootlegs while avoiding unwanted attention from theater producers. Advisors/Committee Members: Scott, Suzanne, 1979- (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Theater; Fandom; Bootleg

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stickler, T. M. (2019). Theater bootlegs : discourses on access and class in theater fandom. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/1627

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stickler, Toni Maria. “Theater bootlegs : discourses on access and class in theater fandom.” 2019. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/1627.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stickler, Toni Maria. “Theater bootlegs : discourses on access and class in theater fandom.” 2019. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Stickler TM. Theater bootlegs : discourses on access and class in theater fandom. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/1627.

Council of Science Editors:

Stickler TM. Theater bootlegs : discourses on access and class in theater fandom. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2019. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.26153/tsw/1627


University of Texas – Austin

2. Alexander, Benjamin Keith. Procedural identification : algorithmic role-playing in video games.

Degree: MA, Radio-Television-Film, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

Video games and role-playing games both possess the ability to structure the player’s experience of themselves around their underlying and internal structures. Tabletop role-playing games do so through complex rules involving random dice rolls whereas video games do so through their basic algorithmic and software structure. This thesis investigates how the combination of properties from both media in the form of video role-playing games, or vRPGs, can impact and structure the player’s sense of identification with the player character. This thesis draws heavily on Wendy Chun, Alexander Galloway and Ian Bogost’s theories of procedurality in games as well as both modern and post-modern theories of identity and identification in order to argue that vRPGs have the ability to actively guide and construct the player’s identification. When looked at as procedural media, one quickly discovers that games are capable of interacting and responding to the player. I chose to call this quality of games “procedural identification”. This thesis also foregrounds the importance of the played aspect of games in order to highlight the fact that the sense of identification that comes from playing a game is both active and the result of the player’s interactions with the game’s programmatic interface. In essence, the meaning of a game emerges only during and after play. By structuring this play according to underlying algorithmic processes, games are capable of structure the player’s interaction and experience in unique and incredibly rich ways. Advisors/Committee Members: Scott, Suzanne, 1979- (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Video games; Roleplaying; Identification; Tabletop; Procedurality

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Alexander, B. K. (2017). Procedural identification : algorithmic role-playing in video games. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/61699

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Alexander, Benjamin Keith. “Procedural identification : algorithmic role-playing in video games.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/61699.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Alexander, Benjamin Keith. “Procedural identification : algorithmic role-playing in video games.” 2017. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Alexander BK. Procedural identification : algorithmic role-playing in video games. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/61699.

Council of Science Editors:

Alexander BK. Procedural identification : algorithmic role-playing in video games. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/61699


University of Texas – Austin

3. Hilburn, Kaitlin Elizabeth. Transformative gameplay practices : speedrunning through Hyrule.

Degree: MA, Radio-Television-Film, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

The term “transformative” gets used in both fan studies and video game studies and gestures toward a creative productivity that goes beyond simply consuming a text. However, despite this shared term, game studies and fan studies remain fairly separate in their respective examination of fans and gamers, in part due to media differences between video games and more traditional media, like television. Bridging the gap between these two fields not only helps to better explain transformative gameplay, but also offers additional insights in how fans consume texts, often looking for new ways to experience the source text. This report examines the transformative gameplay practices found within video game fan communities and provides an overview of their development and spread. It looks at three facets of transformative gameplay, performance, mastery, and education, using the transformative gameplay practices around The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time (1998) as a primary case study. Advisors/Committee Members: Scott, Suzanne, 1979- (advisor), Fuller-Seeley, Kathy (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Video games; Fandom

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hilburn, K. E. (2017). Transformative gameplay practices : speedrunning through Hyrule. (Masters Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/62782

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hilburn, Kaitlin Elizabeth. “Transformative gameplay practices : speedrunning through Hyrule.” 2017. Masters Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed October 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/62782.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hilburn, Kaitlin Elizabeth. “Transformative gameplay practices : speedrunning through Hyrule.” 2017. Web. 20 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hilburn KE. Transformative gameplay practices : speedrunning through Hyrule. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/62782.

Council of Science Editors:

Hilburn KE. Transformative gameplay practices : speedrunning through Hyrule. [Masters Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/62782

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