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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Mahajan, Vijay, 1948-"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Arora, Sandeep. To free, or not to free : the impact of free versions, average user raings, and App characteristics on the adoption speed of paid mobile Apps.

Degree: Marketing, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

The mobile application (App) industry has grown tremendously over the past five years, primarily fueled by small App development businesses. Lacking advertising budgets, these relatively unknown, small businesses often offer free versions of their paid Apps to reduce customer uncertainty about App quality and get noticed in the crowded App industry. In this research I investigate the implications of offering free versions on the adoption speed of paid Apps by building on the existing marketing and information systems literature on sampling and versioning. Using a unique dataset of 2.82 million observations from 4,180 Apps and accounting for endogeneity, I find that while the strategy of offering free versions of paid Apps is popular, it impacts the adoption speed of paid Apps negatively. I also find that the presence of free versions has a larger negative impact on the adoption speed of Apps bought for fun and pleasure (hedonic Apps) and in the later life stages of paid Apps. I expect that the results of my study will enable App developers to make informed decisions about offering free versions of paid Apps and prompt academicians to produce more work focusing on this industry. Advisors/Committee Members: Mahajan, Vijay, 1948- (advisor), Hofstede, Frenkel ter, 1968- (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Mobile Apps; Free versions; Sampling, versioning; Adoption speed; User rating; Developer reputation

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Arora, S. (2014). To free, or not to free : the impact of free versions, average user raings, and App characteristics on the adoption speed of paid mobile Apps. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/24841

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Arora, Sandeep. “To free, or not to free : the impact of free versions, average user raings, and App characteristics on the adoption speed of paid mobile Apps.” 2014. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/24841.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Arora, Sandeep. “To free, or not to free : the impact of free versions, average user raings, and App characteristics on the adoption speed of paid mobile Apps.” 2014. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Arora S. To free, or not to free : the impact of free versions, average user raings, and App characteristics on the adoption speed of paid mobile Apps. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/24841.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Arora S. To free, or not to free : the impact of free versions, average user raings, and App characteristics on the adoption speed of paid mobile Apps. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/24841

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


University of Texas – Austin

2. -3236-1153. Pricing implications of self-control dynamics.

Degree: Marketing, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

Self-control failure can arise as a result of numerous reasons; however, existing models of self-control largely overlook many of these causes. My dissertation examines two such sources of self-control failure in a buyer-seller framework. In turn, I generate new marketing insights for product categories affected by consumers' self-control limitations. My first essay examines instances in which a resolution seeker becomes demotivated after a minor lapse or slip-up. To examine this issue, I utilize a self-signaling model that accounts for the complex process in which a consumer manages his self-control perceptions during a long-term resolution. Specifically, I employ a model wherein a consumer oscillates between long-term resolution planning and short-term implementation: during each implementation juncture, the consumer must determine whether to lapse or follow through with prior resolution plans, a decision that affects his self-control perceptions in subsequent periods of long-term resolution planning. Using this framework, I derive many significant marketing insights for self-improvement programs, products which assist the pursuit of long-term resolutions. I first determine when a profit-maximizing seller prefers revenue collection through upfront fees vis-Ă -vis per-usage fees. I also establish when self-signaling, as a process to manage self-control perceptions, leads to higher per-usage rates. In addition, I examine the product quality implications of self-signaling and find that, under certain cost conditions, a joint product and pricing strategy reduces the likelihood of program use. Finally, I analyze the use of variable per-usage fees, determining how introductory and loyalty discounts influence self-control perceptions over time. My second essay considers the short-term psychological fatigue which results from the exercise of self-control. I utilize a model in which a consumer's cost of resisting temptation depends on his prior decisions: if he previously exercised self-control, his mental fatigue necessitates that he exert greater effort to resist temptation again. I then employ this framework to investigate a firm's sales promotion strategy when selling a product that offers immediate gratification. I determine the circumstances in which the seller offers a short-term price promotion and, when offered, how the seller times its sale with respect to fatigue. Advisors/Committee Members: Mahajan, Vijay, 1948- (advisor), Rao, Raghunath Singh (advisor), Henderson, Ty (committee member), Sonnier, Garrett (committee member), Wiseman, Thomas (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Game theory; Behavioral economics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-3236-1153. (2015). Pricing implications of self-control dynamics. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31498

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-3236-1153. “Pricing implications of self-control dynamics.” 2015. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31498.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-3236-1153. “Pricing implications of self-control dynamics.” 2015. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-3236-1153. Pricing implications of self-control dynamics. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31498.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

-3236-1153. Pricing implications of self-control dynamics. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/31498

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Liu, Zhuping. Push and pull : targeting and couponing in mobile marketing.

Degree: Marketing, 2017, University of Texas – Austin

The prevalence of mobile marketing practices has profoundly changed the way consumers shop. Consumers are increasingly shifting to mobile coupons to enhance their shopping experiences. This shift to mobile has created unique opportunities for marketers to engage and target consumers who both actively pull coupons from the mobile app and passively receive targeted push messages about coupons. The literature in mobile marketing is new and numerous issues have not yet been studied. My dissertation examines two such issues in mobile marketing to advance our understanding of the role of mobile promotions in consumers’ shopping journeys and to explore effective personalization strategies in mobile marketing. My first essay examines the effect of mobile promotions on foot traffic by capturing the dynamic interactions among shopper-initiated and publisher-initiated activities. Shoppers might receive targeted push messages based on either their individual historical behavior ("behavior-based push") or their current location ("location-based push"). I develop a novel multinomial multivariate point process model, which predicts the dynamic interactions between activities. To overcome computational issues in estimation, I develop a new methodology that allows the model to zoom in to days that include activities and to zoom out of inactive days. My simulation of a 15-day period reveals the following insights. First, a behavior-based push leads to an increase in mobile engagement outside malls of more than 25% and an increase in shopping traffic to online stores of about 24%. Second, a behavior-based push would result in an increase in foot traffic to regional malls of about 5% but to strip malls of only about 0.5%. Third, a behavior-based push leads to an increase in mobile engagement inside malls of more than 19% and in coupon redemptions of about 18%, while a location-based push increases mobile engagement inside malls by about 40% and coupon redemptions by about 25%. Therefore, behavior-based push and location-based push play different roles in influencing shopper-initiated activities. I conclude with implications for publishers, mall owners, and retailers on how to leverage mobile marketing to increase mobile engagement, online traffic, foot traffic, and coupon redemptions. My second essay studies the ranking and personalization of organic and sponsored mobile advertising (or coupons) that mix together when delivered to consumers. The publisher faces a tradeoff between placing sponsored ads from retailers to receive revenue from advertised retailers and selecting the right organic ads to keep consumers engaged. I propose a consumer mobile search model that can account for the unique factors in our empirical context and answer my research questions. I present model-free evidence for the influence of screen size, whether consumers are in a shopping mall and ad type. I also show how consumer sliding and clicking influence their exit decisions. The proposed counterfactual simulations explore different ways of personalization,… Advisors/Committee Members: Mahajan, Vijay, 1948- (advisor), Rao, Raghunath (committee member), Duan, Jun (committee member), Scott, James (committee member), Cunningham, Cotter (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Mobile marketing; Targeting; Consumer search

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, Z. (2017). Push and pull : targeting and couponing in mobile marketing. (Thesis). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/62095

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Zhuping. “Push and pull : targeting and couponing in mobile marketing.” 2017. Thesis, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed February 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/62095.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Zhuping. “Push and pull : targeting and couponing in mobile marketing.” 2017. Web. 19 Feb 2019.

Vancouver:

Liu Z. Push and pull : targeting and couponing in mobile marketing. [Internet] [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. [cited 2019 Feb 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/62095.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Liu Z. Push and pull : targeting and couponing in mobile marketing. [Thesis]. University of Texas – Austin; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/62095

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.