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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Hunt, Bruce J."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Hunt, Jonathan Reid. Into the bargain : the triumph and tragedy of nuclear internationalism during the mid-Cold War, 1958-1970.

Degree: PhD, History, 2013, University of Texas – Austin

The making of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) occupied the energy and attention of world powers, great and small, from the Irish Resolution’s proposal at the United Nations General Assembly in 1958 to the treaty’s entry into force in 1970. Accounts of why the international community fashioned a treaty whose articles and principles embody a tangle of self-contradictory rights, privileges, and obligations point to United States and Soviet hegemony, the rise of Soviet-American détente, or the intrinsic dangers of nuclear weapons. In contrast to these interpretations, this dissertation claims that the negotiation and achievement of the NPT was a contingent event whose course and content were shaped by a jumble of entangled causes: Cold War alliances, domestic politics, decolonization, the Vietnam War, and a schism in internationalist thought. The common impulse, however, was the perceived need to bring order to the Nuclear Age amid recurrent crises whose outbreak threatened global conflict if the spread of nuclear weapons continued unabated. In the contexts of the Cold War and decolonization, the establishment of a global nuclear order required Soviet-American cooperation in concert with the involvement of an international community then emerging from decolonization. Both were embodied in the cadre of arms control diplomats then working in Geneva and New York City. In the final analysis, the Cold War obstructed more than it abetted the treaty’s brokering and Soviet-American détente was more the result of international nuclear diplomacy than its cause. The Vietnam War both limited U.S. willingness to contemplate nuclear assurances requested by nuclear have-nots and the underlying reason that U.S. President Lyndon Johnson sacrificed a NATO multilateral nuclear force for the sake of an NPT in an effort to quiet antiwar dissent at home. Soviet-American cooperation was necessary but not sufficient to achieve the treaty. The failure of initial efforts, the international consensus required to legitimate the treaty, and concurrent talks for a Latin American nuclear-free zone allowed nuclear have-nots to inscribe their preferences on the NPT, whose fusion of a nuclear hierarchy and a grand bargain remains an open chapter in the history of nuclear internationalism. Advisors/Committee Members: Brands, H. W. (advisor), Lawrence, Mark Atwood (committee member), Gavin, Francis J. (committee member), Hunt, Bruce J. (committee member), Wynn, Charters S. (committee member), Suri, Jeremi (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Nuclear proliferation; U.S. foreign policy; International history; Global governance; The Cold War; Nuclear science and technology; Nuclear diplomacy; Latin America

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hunt, J. R. (2013). Into the bargain : the triumph and tragedy of nuclear internationalism during the mid-Cold War, 1958-1970. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/44062

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hunt, Jonathan Reid. “Into the bargain : the triumph and tragedy of nuclear internationalism during the mid-Cold War, 1958-1970.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/44062.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hunt, Jonathan Reid. “Into the bargain : the triumph and tragedy of nuclear internationalism during the mid-Cold War, 1958-1970.” 2013. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Hunt JR. Into the bargain : the triumph and tragedy of nuclear internationalism during the mid-Cold War, 1958-1970. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/44062.

Council of Science Editors:

Hunt JR. Into the bargain : the triumph and tragedy of nuclear internationalism during the mid-Cold War, 1958-1970. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/44062


University of Texas – Austin

2. -0120-0667. Selling the African wilds : a history of the safari tourism industry in East Africa, 1900-1939.

Degree: PhD, History, 2015, University of Texas – Austin

This dissertation examines the rise and development of the safari tourism industry in the British East Africa Protectorate (later Kenya) between 1900 and 1939. It shows how the establishment of British rule and the introduction of modern transportation technology made East Africa accessible and gradually transformed the region into a tourist attraction of great economic value that would come to be managed by imperial powers, advertised in a globalized marketplace, and visited by tourists who desired to hunt, photograph, and observe East Africa’s abundant wildlife on an adventure known as the “safari.” It became a lucrative business. Numerous outfitters, safari and travel companies, guides, and other safari workers entered the business and helped to make the industry a model of its kind in Africa. As the safari trade expanded and animal populations came under pressure, however, this industry began to adopt new, eco-friendly forms of wildlife tourism that could preserve the main elements of the tourist safari while reducing its toll on wildlife populations, a shift exemplified by the introduction of motorized tours, photographic and filmmaking safaris, and the quest to establish national parks. The research presented in this study, drawn from archival collections across three continents, demonstrates that the four decades between 1900 and 1939 became a crucial phase in the development of safari tourism in Kenya. During this time, safari tourism became a leading sector of the regional economy and gave rise to a highly developed commercial and institutional infrastructure that laid the foundations of modern wildlife tourism in Kenya. At the same time, the safari industry became a product of the British Empire, shaped by the laws, institutions, and attitudes of colonial rule. While the introduction of British rule and the arrival of British colonists promoted tourist development, built roads and railways, ensured a degree of security demanded by travelers, and linked foreign tourists with Africa, it also relegated indigenous Africans to subordinate positions in the industry, and forcibly relocated African settlements to make way for parks and tourist spaces. This meant that the prerogatives of the tourism industry often clashed with indigenous ideas of land use and economic management, instead serving the interests of the British community in Kenya who owned and controlled the trade. Thus, the development of safari tourism under the aegis of the British colonial state aided the material development of the industry, but also created economic, social, and racial inequalities that remain evident to the present day. Advisors/Committee Members: Louis, William Roger, 1936- (advisor), Hunt, Bruce J (committee member), Vaughn, James M (committee member), Raby, Megan (committee member), Zuelow, Eric G.E. (committee member), Lewis, Joanna (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Safari; Tourism; Africa; Kenya; British Empire; Wildlife; Conservation; Hunting; Environment; Travel; Adventure; Safari trade; Safari industry; Sustainable tourism; Sustainable wildlife tourism; Sustainable safaris; Tourism and economy; Safari tourism infrastructure; British colonial rule; Safari industry development; Tourism and colonial rule

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

-0120-0667. (2015). Selling the African wilds : a history of the safari tourism industry in East Africa, 1900-1939. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63902

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

-0120-0667. “Selling the African wilds : a history of the safari tourism industry in East Africa, 1900-1939.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63902.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

-0120-0667. “Selling the African wilds : a history of the safari tourism industry in East Africa, 1900-1939.” 2015. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Vancouver:

-0120-0667. Selling the African wilds : a history of the safari tourism industry in East Africa, 1900-1939. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63902.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete

Council of Science Editors:

-0120-0667. Selling the African wilds : a history of the safari tourism industry in East Africa, 1900-1939. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/63902

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Author name may be incomplete


University of Texas – Austin

3. Cushman, Gregory Todd. The lords of guano: science and the management of Peru's marine environment, 1800-1973.

Degree: PhD, History, 2003, University of Texas – Austin

This is an ecological history of a development project planned and managed by technical experts: the origin, decline, spectacular revival, and tragic fate of the Peruvian guano industry. In another sense, this is a social history of an elite type – the environmental technocrat – and those they served. During the nineteenth century, scientific travelers appropriated Andean knowledge of vast, ancient deposits of nitrogen fertilizer for use by farmers in the Northern Hemisphere. During the early twentieth century, environmental scientists reoriented the guano industry for Peruvian use. They oversaw the development of perhaps “the greatest of all industries based upon the conservation of wild animals.” This project had both global and local repercussions. The two-way exchange of personnel, ideas, and technologies between Peru and the rest of the world revolutionized scientific understanding of the Peru Current ecosystem. This knowledge led directly to international recognition of the global importance of the El Niño phenomenon. Through the issue of human population control, Peru’s experiment inspired the emergence of an environmental movement that spanned the Americas after World War II. In Peru, technical experts fundamentally influenced the political process, input-intensive agriculture, artisanal and industrial fishing, the organization of “big science” institutions, as well as the guano birds and their ecological community. Ultimately, technocrats enriched and empowered a new ruling class for Peru. Beginning in the 1940s, the specter of an impending catastrophe in the global food supply gave impetus to the exploitation of the world’s fish stocks. To serve this demand, scientists helped engineer for Peru the largest industrial fishery on Earth. Their studies legitimated the decision to let the guano birds pass into oblivion so their food, the anchoveta, could be processed into animal feed. As a reflection of persistent global trends of food distribution, rather than feed the world’s undernourished, this fishmeal enabled affluent northerners to consume more meat. This fishery was carefully supervised by experts, but they proved unable to prevent its collapse during the El Niño of 1972-1973. This ecological disaster reveals how fleeting “sustainable growth” can be, even for the bestmanaged development projects. Advisors/Committee Members: Hunt, Bruce J. (advisor), Graham, Richard (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Guano industry – Peru

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cushman, G. T. (2003). The lords of guano: science and the management of Peru's marine environment, 1800-1973. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/531

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cushman, Gregory Todd. “The lords of guano: science and the management of Peru's marine environment, 1800-1973.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed September 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/531.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cushman, Gregory Todd. “The lords of guano: science and the management of Peru's marine environment, 1800-1973.” 2003. Web. 15 Sep 2019.

Vancouver:

Cushman GT. The lords of guano: science and the management of Peru's marine environment, 1800-1973. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2003. [cited 2019 Sep 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/531.

Council of Science Editors:

Cushman GT. The lords of guano: science and the management of Peru's marine environment, 1800-1973. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2003. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/531

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