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You searched for +publisher:"University of Texas – Austin" +contributor:("Briley, Margaret E."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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University of Texas – Austin

1. Calloway, Eric Elyett. A novel measurement method of, and factors associated with, the healthfulness of parent-child food purchasing interactions.

Degree: PhD, Nutritional Sciences, 2014, University of Texas – Austin

The aims of this research were to 1) demonstrate the validity of using a personally-worn micro-camcorder (PWMC) method to assess in-store parent-child food-purchasing interactions and environmental factors related to these behaviors; 2) examine the relationship between child at-home TV-exposure, home food availability/accessibility, parent dietary modeling, and child-feeding style with the healthfulness of child in-store food purchasing requests; and 3) examine the relationship between parent weight status, parent diet quality, food purchasing intentions, perceived relative cost of healthy food, and the use of nutrition facts labels with the healthfulness of parent responses to child in-store food purchasing requests. A total sample of 40 parent-child dyads completed the study. Parents were a mean age of 36.5 years (±6.3), and children were a mean age of 3.8 years (±1.1). Dyads were met at their usual grocery store and shopping time. Children wore a micro-camcorder or eButton on a hat to capture what they saw. Parents also completed a questionnaire about nutrition behaviors and the home food environment based on validated questions from the literature. Coded personally worn micro-camcorder (PWMC) data were highly correlated (rho = 0.345-0.911, p<0.01) with in-person observational data for assessing in-store behavioral and environmental factors, and the method demonstrated a high degree of reliability for assessing purchasing decisions compared to receipt data (Cohen's kappa = 0.787). Also, inter-rater reliability for assessing environmental/behavioral variables ranged from moderate to almost perfect (Cohen's kappa = 0.466-0.937). Children whose parents reported high levels of unhealthy dietary modeling had lower odds of a food request being healthy (OR=0.50, P=0.021), and having parents who report non-directive child-feeding had increased odds of a request being healthy (OR=1.66, P=0.028). Healthy weight parents were more likely to make healthy responses to child food purchasing requests than overweight/obese parents (OR=2.06, P=0.022). Behavioral interventions that seek to improve the healthfulness of food purchasing in families with young children should include components to promote non-directive feeding styles, discourage unhealthful dietary modeling, provide additional resources to target overweight/obese parents' responses to child requests, and use the PWMC method for efficient measurement of these behaviors. Advisors/Committee Members: Briley, Margaret E. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Family food purchasing; Measurement method; Home food environment; Parent-child interactions

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Calloway, E. E. (2014). A novel measurement method of, and factors associated with, the healthfulness of parent-child food purchasing interactions. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/26074

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Calloway, Eric Elyett. “A novel measurement method of, and factors associated with, the healthfulness of parent-child food purchasing interactions.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/26074.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Calloway, Eric Elyett. “A novel measurement method of, and factors associated with, the healthfulness of parent-child food purchasing interactions.” 2014. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Calloway EE. A novel measurement method of, and factors associated with, the healthfulness of parent-child food purchasing interactions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/26074.

Council of Science Editors:

Calloway EE. A novel measurement method of, and factors associated with, the healthfulness of parent-child food purchasing interactions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/26074

2. Almansour, Fawaz. Boosting Lunch Is In The Bag.

Degree: PhD, Nutritional Sciences, 2011, University of Texas – Austin

Lunch Is In The Bag (LIITB) was a multi-level behavioral intervention with the goal of increasing the amounts of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains that parents pack in their preschoolers' lunches. The purpose of this dissertation project was to: 1) to examine the temperatures of perishable food items packed in preschoolers' sack lunches; 2) to examine parents' psychosocial constructs that relate to packing fruits, vegetables, and whole grains at four periods during the booster study; 3) to assess the servings of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains with the related nutrient content at four periods during the booster study. The four assessment periods are before LIITB, after LIITB, before the one-week booster, and after the one-week booster. Results showed that more than 97 percent of perishable food items in the sack lunches were stored at unacceptable temperatures (40-140°F). Servings of vegetables (-0.15, p=0.05) and whole grains (-0.53, p<0.0001) in preschool lunches decreased significantly before the booster in the intervention group. The booster increased the servings of vegetables (0.10, p=0.09) and whole grains (0.16, p =0.01) compared to booster baseline. The one-week booster increased thiamin, dietary fiber, and vitamin C content of foods in preschoolers' lunches. During the booster study, parents experienced improvement in psychosocial variables after LIITB and before the booster. Knowledge decreased before the booster. Parents' psychosocial variables were linked to packing more vegetables and significantly more whole grains due to the intervention. Education for parents and the public must focus on methods of packing safe, healthy lunches in order to prevent foodborne illness and chronic disease. The results of this study provide data for continued examination of an area of parental behavior related to packing lunches for their children. The booster study demonstrated that a booster was important for maintenance of program outcomes, and to increase the servings of vegetables and whole grains that parents packed in their preschool children's lunches. Advisors/Committee Members: Briley, Margaret E. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Preschool; Fruits; Vegetables; Whole grains; Food safety; Behavior; Psychosocial; Packing

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APA (6th Edition):

Almansour, F. (2011). Boosting Lunch Is In The Bag. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/30389

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Almansour, Fawaz. “Boosting Lunch Is In The Bag.” 2011. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/30389.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Almansour, Fawaz. “Boosting Lunch Is In The Bag.” 2011. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Almansour F. Boosting Lunch Is In The Bag. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2011. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/30389.

Council of Science Editors:

Almansour F. Boosting Lunch Is In The Bag. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/30389

3. Padget, Alison Marie. Effects of childcare on parents' attitudes and behaviors in shaping their child's food habits.

Degree: PhD, Nutritional Sciences, 2003, University of Texas – Austin

The purpose of this study was to determine whether parents of children who attend childcare centers have different attitudes and behaviors toward shaping their child's eating habits than parents of children who stay at home, and whether these attitudes and behaviors affect their child's dietary intake and weight. Fifty parents of 3- to 5-year-old children who attended childcare centers and fifty parents of 3- to 5-year-old children who stayed at home in Central Texas participated in the study. Parents completed questionnaires designed to measure the factors they considered when choosing food for their child, and their perceived influence on, satisfaction with, responsibility for, and control over their child's eating habits. After receiving training and measuring utensils, parents completed 3-day dietary records for their child. A researcher recorded the children's food intake when they were at the childcare center. Children's height and weight were measured, and body mass index was plotted on the CDC BMIfor- age growth charts (2000). Twelve percent of childcare children were obese compared to 2 percent of stay-at-home children (p<0.05). Children in childcare consumed more energy, vegetables, fat, saturated fat, and sweetened beverages than stay-at-home children (p<0.05), mostly due to consumption at the center. Both groups met requirements for all food groups and nutrients except grains, vegetables, and vitamin E. Their diets were too high in fat, contributing 32 percent of total energy. There was no evidence that parents of children in childcare felt less responsible for, less influential on, more satisfied with, or exerted less control over their child's diet than stay-at-home parents. Parents of childcare children believed that they and the childcare center shared responsibility for their child's nutrition. They felt that time was a more important factor in choosing food for their child than did stay-at-home parents. Parents who perceived lack of time to be an obstacle had children who consumed less energy, iron, and fat during the evening hours. Parents of overweight children felt more influential on and were more satisfied with their child's diets than parents of normal weight children. No other parental attitudes were predictive of children's food intake or weight status. Advisors/Committee Members: Briley, Margaret E. (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Food habits; Children; Parental influence; Parental control; Childcare; Daycare; Eating habits; Stay-at-home

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Padget, A. M. (2003). Effects of childcare on parents' attitudes and behaviors in shaping their child's food habits. (Doctoral Dissertation). University of Texas – Austin. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2152/29828

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Padget, Alison Marie. “Effects of childcare on parents' attitudes and behaviors in shaping their child's food habits.” 2003. Doctoral Dissertation, University of Texas – Austin. Accessed November 20, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2152/29828.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Padget, Alison Marie. “Effects of childcare on parents' attitudes and behaviors in shaping their child's food habits.” 2003. Web. 20 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Padget AM. Effects of childcare on parents' attitudes and behaviors in shaping their child's food habits. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2003. [cited 2019 Nov 20]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/29828.

Council of Science Editors:

Padget AM. Effects of childcare on parents' attitudes and behaviors in shaping their child's food habits. [Doctoral Dissertation]. University of Texas – Austin; 2003. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2152/29828

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